Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maiden name vs Married Name

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Tim View Post
    Doc Spouse
    No one uses the “de maiden name” in either the Hispanic or American culture. Hispanics hyphenate the mothers maiden name for legal identity purposes.
    I may not be understanding you correctly. If so, I apologize. Are you saying that the children only have the family name on the father's side? If that's the case, it's incorrect. The only time I've seen a Latin child without both names (father-mother) is when the mother is single and didn't want to recognize the father at all. I included a link describing what I'm speaking of.

    Maybe you're talking about in every day conversation? I agree completely in that case. It would be a mouthful to say, "Hey, did you see Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria yesterday? The police were after him!"

    We were talking about legal name changes though, so that's why I brought up the family names.

    Edit: On further thought, maybe you were talking about marriage? As in, the wife changes her name to the husband's family name and loses the maternal apellido. I've seen that in some countries (Colombia I think does this with the de), but many others in South America do not.
    Last edited by Doc Spouse; 02-26-2020, 05:20 AM.
    I should have been a pair of ragged claws. Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Cubicle View Post

      ... Very genius.
      She was watching as I typed that, and assured me that if she ever left, she would do whatever is necessary (to include hacking websites and paying off government officials) to make sure her name was changed back on all publications and references. I don't doubt it.
      I should have been a pair of ragged claws. Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Doc Spouse View Post

        I may not be understanding you correctly. If so, I apologize. Are you saying that the children only have the family name on the father's side? If that's the case, it's incorrect. The only time I've seen a Latin child without both names (father-mother) is when the mother is single and didn't want to recognize the father at all. I included a link describing what I'm speaking of.

        Maybe you're talking about in every day conversation? I agree completely in that case. It would be a mouthful to say, "Hey, did you see Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria yesterday? The police were after him!"

        We were talking about legal name changes though, so that's why I brought up the family names.

        Edit: On further thought, maybe you were talking about marriage. As in, the wife changes her name to the husband's family name and loses the maternal apellido. I've seen that in some countries (Colombia I think does this with the de), but not in many others in South America.
        Millennials? I go ask that ex-prince guy, Harry what’s his name?
        People seem to “identify” and call it tradition.
        Like South American is no longer popular.
        Latin America encompasses such other countries and territories as Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Guatemala, Ecuador, Cuba, Bolivia, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Paraguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Guadeloupe, Martinique, French Guiana, Saint Martin and Saint Barthelemy.May 31, 2018.
        Latino was invented in 1970! I guess that’s heritage! But then again, we can point to language, namely Spanish. But that’s in Europe!
        The point is that history and culture is being redefined on the fly.
        It really is.
        Read the birth certificates! Read the death certificates. First , middle, Family name for a child is specified. Then they get married. And the games begin.

        Comment


        • #49
          My mom is a professional working woman (not in health care) and she decided legally changing her name was too much hassle/expensive. She privately goes by her husbands name and professionally by her maiden name.

          I am planning on doing this too.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Lordosis View Post
            What do y'all do with the kids last name?
            And when people seem to be confused advise that they are my kids, not step-kids. But carried their birth certificates in my wallet until they were of age in case someone thought I was kidnapping them on plane/ international travel.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
              I kept my name when I got married. I'm also a guy...but it's also 2019 so you never know.
              My kid and husband changed their names to First Name- Her family name (as middle name)- His family name (as last name). My cousin FP doc my age and her family did that in the 1980s- and kids same thing. Ends my 2nd or 3rd generation giving a grandparent's first name as middle name, but oh well. Surprisingly easy for her to change her name and very tough for him to change his (whereas me 30 years ago they wouldn't let me open utility accounts in husband's name since we clearly weren't married since my name was different! Military orders, marriage certificates, and PoAs be damned) both in the South.
              Last edited by Jenn; 11-05-2020, 07:35 AM.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by DCdoc View Post
                My wife took my last name but she says that was mainly because it was a huge upgrade over her last name and she truly thought it would benefit her professionally
                Friends in residency were constantly paged overhead "Paging Dr W- female" "Paging Dr W male" and my husband's last name is very common and more often associated with boxing managers and flamboyant radio guys. I was also military and feared a fouled up paycheck for months. And when I was a college student on some University 'let a student sit in on the vetting' committee for doctors working the student health clinic I suspected fraud of the doc whose diplomas and name differed, especially with all the Latin on the diploma. Knew very little about marriage, degrees, or medicine back then.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Since this thread was started, my 83-y.o. mom (widow 30 years) married a good friend from church (84 y.o. widower) and she wouldn't have dreamed of not changing her last name. While she'll continue answering to her former last name (since age 18), she was determined to have his name!!! And, in the age of COVID, she has navigated numerous bureaucratic hurdles. They married 8/1 and she's still working on SS card, but she finally got her new driver's license.

                  They are probably one of the happiest couples I know. Helps that they are both in good health and laugh a lot.
                  Working to protect good doctors from bad advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    One of the worst things you can do to a child is give them a hyphenated last name. Just don't do it! Kids are so sensitive and want to desperately not stand out, especially in a school or sports situation. If you want a hyphenated name, just do it for yourself but not your child. IMHO....

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X