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I Un-Quit! (Oy!)

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  • #46
    Sounds like we don't need to worry about you. You have covered your bases.  Good luck and keep posting.

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    • #47
      Your spouse makes $200 - $300k? I'm surprised you didn't quit 10 years ago.

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      • #48
        Congrats! Good Luck and enjoy the ride!

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        • #49
          Vagabond MD,

          Thanks for sharing, sound like you are in a bulletproof financial situation. 20 years in IR is an absolute grind, I don't know how or why people do it. I couldn't. In my observation call has become busier and less satisfying (maybe all of medicine in fact). Internal locums without call could be a great option for you if you still enjoy the work.

          I think the take hope point is that now you are free to peruse whatever you want, either in medicine or not. Imagine how you would feel if you knew you had to work another 10 years to retire. Also I found it interesting how your feelings about radiology and medicine changed in the 20 years you have been practicing. I think we underestimate how much and how fast our attitudes can change.

          Be like the Vagabond everyone, seek FI by 50 (actually I advocate 45, but whats 5 years among friends). Good luck with the next chapter and keep us informed. I'm always curious how the ego responds to cutting out a big part of our identity, you may find this to be the more challenging part of letting go of medicine. I'm a fan of the slow exit with either part-time or locums work.

          8-)

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          • #50
            Just wanted to chime in and say I sold my second practice. Holding on to the primary one as I have decided to transition out of medicine. Over the last year I have lost passion for medicine. In the next year or so plan to be out completely from clinical work.

            I would say that as a resident I was all about research / long hours in clinic etc but as an attending building private practice it became more business like. When that started happening I feel like my "medical" curiosity just took a hit. I got into medicine for research and patient care but I have lost that drive. Possibly I'll move into academics but in my field that is very tough to get; nevertheless i'll give it a shot. May be if I was in academics from the get go I might have felt different, but as I mentioned it was tough to get a good academic practice where I live.

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            • #51
              I agree with HappyPhilosopher above. Aim for 45 or 50 (or even earlier if possible) for financial independence. I found that just being financially independent made me enjoy medicine so much more because I could cut out the parts I didn't like and keep the parts I enjoyed.

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              • #52




                Just wanted to chime in and say I sold my second practice. Holding on to the primary one as I have decided to transition out of medicine. Over the last year I have lost passion for medicine. In the next year or so plan to be out completely from clinical work.

                I would say that as a resident I was all about research / long hours in clinic etc but as an attending building private practice it became more business like. When that started happening I feel like my “medical” curiosity just took a hit. I got into medicine for research and patient care but I have lost that drive. Possibly I’ll move into academics but in my field that is very tough to get; nevertheless i’ll give it a shot. May be if I was in academics from the get go I might have felt different, but as I mentioned it was tough to get a good academic practice where I live.
                Click to expand...


                Wow! I wish you every success in your ongoing and future ventures. I know from your posts that you have the entrepreneurial spirit, and I don't doubt you'll do well outside of medicine if that's where you end up.

                I nearly said "congratulations," but that's not quite the right sentiment. Bummer that you've lost that curiosity and / or feeling of fulfillment from taking care of patients, but you're certainly not alone. That shine has lost its luster for many physicians, unfortunately.

                Keep us posted on what comes next!

                Best,

                -PoF

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                • #53
                  Thanks PoF. Will keep you guys posted!

                  Mostly its going back to doing and findings things that I would like to do from here on out and possible some kind of teaching medicine type of jobs because my best "fun" years were in residency despite brutal hours.

                  I definitely would like to thank this board and many posters, you, Dahle for continuing to maintain such the forum for exchange of ideas and thoughts - it helps a ton.

                   

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                  • #54
                    Update--I Un-Quit...sort of.

                    Lots has occurred since I quit nearly three months ago, and I have decided to stay on a bit longer, on my own terms. I still do get a decent amount of personal satisfaction from my job, and I especially like the friendships and bonds I have created on my IR team. Inspired by my colleague, The Happy Philosopher, I am exploring working on a part time basis, perhaps with my current group, perhaps elsewhere in or out of town. We are rooted here, for the time being, by my wife's job, kids in high school, and wife's elderly parents, but I am increasingly learning of radiologists commuting out of town to work for a week at a time. It is not ideal, but if I am going to work in the kind of situation that I would like to work, that may be my best shot.

                    The decision to stay in practice for a while longer was more emotional than financial, but it certainly has financial implications. I was under the misguided assumption that my services were not in demand, but within a week of my resignation, I received three calls from colleagues in town wanting to know if I would come work for them (note to young MDs, build a network over time). I also made the conscious decision that I was no longer going to play the stooge, sucking it up for the hospital, the community, or even my partners. I had enough of that. I will continue to support my partners (many of whom are personal friends), but I will primarily work for myself and the pleasure of working, and if there is no pleasure left, I will move along.

                    So in quitting, there was a lot of self-exploration, that led me back to work, but my mindset is completely different, and it all feels right. The end.

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                    • #55
                      Good for you,  Vagabond MD! That just warms my heart and I am glad to learn there is a happy ending to your story.
                      Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

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                      • #56
                        Vagabond, be sure to keep us posted on your new situation.  I wish you luck in finding fulfillment.

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                        • #57
                          Congratulations, great job. As a hospitalist I know exactly what you mean. I have worked every other weekend and intermittent nights, every other Christmas, Thanksgiving etc. for the last 8 years. At this point I still really like what I do and the 7 days off allow me to recoup, but I know ar some point in the future (not sure when) I'm gonna want a change. You will be beyond fine and 50 is such a great age to do what your doing. Bye the way who cares what the other doctors/friends say, if they were in your position they may do the same thing. I bet most are not in your same position and FI at 50!

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                          • #58
                            That is awesome Vagabond! I love it. Thank you for the feedback and follow-up. It sounds like you have found purpose and clarity after introspection and stepping back a bit. I found this to be true for me as well. I'm very happy that you found the right path for you. I wish you well.

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                            • #59
                              Good luck ahead, Vagabond MD! I suspect you will find much greater satisfaction now that you have outlined your goal. All the very best!

                               

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                              • #60




                                Just wanted to chime in and say I sold my second practice. Holding on to the primary one as I have decided to transition out of medicine. Over the last year I have lost passion for medicine. In the next year or so plan to be out completely from clinical work.

                                I would say that as a resident I was all about research / long hours in clinic etc but as an attending building private practice it became more business like. When that started happening I feel like my “medical” curiosity just took a hit. I got into medicine for research and patient care but I have lost that drive. Possibly I’ll move into academics but in my field that is very tough to get; nevertheless i’ll give it a shot. May be if I was in academics from the get go I might have felt different, but as I mentioned it was tough to get a good academic practice where I live.
                                Click to expand...


                                I'm sorry to hear things aren't working out for you as you had hoped.  But I'm encouraged that you are being self-aware enough to realize this now and act on it.  Too many doctors suffer for decades thinking they can't change their situation.  It takes courage to change.  Congratulations to you.

                                You could get an academic position if you search for it.  It may not end up what you thought though.  Be careful not to jump into it without understanding what that life is like.  Most academic centers have lost state and federal funding and research dollars.  Inorder to pay doctors competitive salaries (still less than private practice though) they require the doctors to be "productive" and cover their overhead.  The system often isn't well set up for a busy practice though.  I have been there and remember trying to be efficient in a system that isn't conducive for that.  I loved the teaching and research but my paycheck really came primarily from clinic work.  Food for thought.

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