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  • Starting Athletic Hobby

    Just as a break from all these market threads

    But what is the mindset/set of rules/guideline for starting an athletic hobby. Lets say wanna get into rock climbing or regular skiing/snowboarding (hello winter olympics brief inspiration mania!) or something else. I mean do it once then give it up is what I see alot but how to people determine this is what they want, love doing, keep doing and adapt to a NEW athletic pursuit?

    Also what are you doing now to keep active?

  • #2
    I cycle, trail run, and lift weights. I think if you are new to a work out regimen it make sense to get a minimum of training to make sure you are using appropriate form.

    My current regimen is a compromise because I had to give up tennis a few years ago. I kept injuring my back while playing. That would be my top choice. Practice once or twice a week and one or two matches per week; it’s a beautiful thing! Miss it -
    My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFF...MwBiAAKd5N8qPg

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    • #3
      I started running 30 years ago, in med school, initially to lose weight and get in shape. I still run, but not as fast or as far and mix it with cycling, hiking, spinning, and elliptical. I still do a couple of trail races per year, nothing longer than 9-10 miles.

      I do some weight lifting, but not enough, and I love yoga but rarely do it.

      I got into skiing as an adult and never got good enough to enjoy as much as others do. As the cost of skiing rose, my level of interest fell in lockstep.

      If you wanted to start running, I recommend joining a local group and training for a 5k. Stick it out until you have completed the the race, as it will be painful for a while. If you still don’t like it after the race, you might want to move on. Running is a great form of fitness because you can do it, literally, anywhere. I have run in Europe, Asia, and South America, in addition to many of the major cities and states in the U.S. It’s a great way to see places.

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      • #4
        Depends where you are coming from. Some sports are easier and cheaper to try out than others. Learning to ski as an adult has a steep learning curve, but picking it up again as an adult is relatively easy.

        A lot of people have gravitated toward the functional fitness models in CrossFit. If you're no spring chicken make sure to start slowly and get the proper training to avoid injury (acute or overuse). But there's no doubt they can be a blast as well as a launching pad for other sports.

        Go with a friend who climbs or hikes. Take skiing or snowboarding lessons. Borrow someone's mountain bike and see what you think. Go with a friend to a CrossFit class or try a a few bodyweight workouts at home (try YouTube).

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        • #5
          I think everyone will have something they can do life long if they get exposure to it. Its just hard to tell what that is for you. You can choose/eliminate some based on cost of equipment, time, how hard it is to do (do you have to drive, etc..).

          I cycle, rarely run though its so much more efficient Im doing it more, and recently got a weight set thing so I could keep my bones, tendons, and muscles in better shape.

          Also great to pair the weather of your locale so that it works with your sport of choice.

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          • #6
            I mountain bike in the woods to start the day just about every day. My best year was 335 days. This past May I was 31 rides in 31 days. On weekdays our group starts at dawn, on weekends at 8:30.

            I love it because I get to ride with my group.  It is a great way to start the day, social time with friends, fresh air outdoors in the woods, and great exercise to boot.  It has become a habit that I mountain bike in all four seasons.  If the snow gets too deep to ride, even with fat tires, we snowshoe on the single track bike trails to tamp down the snow until it gets firm enough to ride.

            The daily fresh air and exercise helps me maintain both physical and emotional health.

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            • #7
              I've been running since junior high and we walk everywhere. I've been trying to do more strength training in the last year and really appreciate exercises that don't require a lot of equipment. I cross country skiied as a kid and plan to get back into that soon, it's hard with a 15 month old though. I plan to take lessons and rent skis until I know if it's something we'll stick with. I'm also interested in snow shoeing since we like to hike in the summer. And some day I'll join another intramural soccer team, that is really fun!
              I think it makes sense to try things your friends are doing, they can teach you and you can borrow equipment. Also good to know yourself- I'm very cautious so I don't love downhill skiing, mountain biking or rock climbing.

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              • #8
                I am doing Yoga classes 2x/week and look forward to increasing to 3x/week in retirement.  I also walk at least 2 miles every day. I have never attempted to ski.

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                • #9


                  get a minimum of training to make sure you are using appropriate form.
                  Click to expand...


                  Yes... wish I would have known this in high school. Still having shoulder issues now and then from benching improperly.

                  +1 for lifting and yoga. Been pursuing calisthenics stuff recently too. It's more fun doing things that take training and muscle development than just pressing weight up.

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                  • #10
                    I’m in my midlife crisis here. I started horseback riding last year and it was incredible. In December after an amazing ride that involved a lot of jumping my knee swelled up.

                    I’m sitting in bed this morning on my stupid CPM post mircrofracture. I’ve used and abused my body for years and now I’m paying the price.

                    I guess my point is that my awesome “new sport” got derailed by body failure. It’s also why I quit running years ago. So as soon as I can, I’m going to be back on the boring peloton bike and eliptical machine that are no impact.

                    This year I intend to try yoga. I need an athletic hobby I can do for the rest of my life without a lot of risk and abuse on my joints. Sucks getting old. I’m 39

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                    • #11




                      Just as a break from all these market threads

                      But what is the mindset/set of rules/guideline for starting an athletic hobby. Lets say wanna get into rock climbing or regular skiing/snowboarding (hello winter olympics brief inspiration mania!) or something else. I mean do it once then give it up is what I see alot but how to people determine this is what they want, love doing, keep doing and adapt to a NEW athletic pursuit?

                      Also what are you doing now to keep active?
                      Click to expand...


                      Try to rent the gear and find someone experienced to do it the first time or two. If you like it, buy the stuff you need to do it safely and in a fun manner.
                      Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

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                      • #12


                        This year I intend to try yoga. I need an athletic hobby I can do for the rest of my life without a lot of risk and abuse on my joints. Sucks getting old. I’m 39
                        Click to expand...


                        I am loving Yoga but I am 60 and very much want to avoid any type of injury.  I consider myself lucky that my horse did not break my hip when he kicked me a few years ago.  I will not be Skiing in Park City.  I now have osteoporosis so I do not need a broken bone.

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                        • #13




                          I started running 30 years ago, in med school, initially to lose weight and get in shape. I still run, but not as fast or as far and mix it with cycling, hiking, spinning, and elliptical. I still do a couple of trail races per year, nothing longer than 9-10 miles.

                          I do some weight lifting, but not enough, and I love yoga but rarely do it.

                          I got into skiing as an adult and never got good enough to enjoy as much as others do. As the cost of skiing rose, my level of interest fell in lockstep.

                          If you wanted to start running, I recommend joining a local group and training for a 5k. Stick it out until you have completed the the race, as it will be painful for a while. If you still don’t like it after the race, you might want to move on. Running is a great form of fitness because you can do it, literally, anywhere. I have run in Europe, Asia, and South America, in addition to many of the major cities and states in the U.S. It’s a great way to see places.
                          Click to expand...


                          Not a huge runner but I do incorporate it into my fitness routine.

                          The best thing about running is, like Vagabond said, you can do it anywhere. Basically when I'm on vacation or at a conference I just pack running shoes and a light running outfit. It's an awesome way to explore a new area even at the 3-5 mile length. Training up to be able to run 4 miles at a comfortable pace is very doable in a few months.

                          On a more general note, I've been continuously working out since my first year of med school. I have tried all kinds of different stuff. I will tell you that as a guy the single best thing you can do IMHO is weight training. It seems to be the thing that actually accomplishes what we all want (body shape, fitness, wt loss, lack of pain). In the last few months I have dropped a lot of cardio in favor of squats and I couldn't be happier.

                          I also do this once a week at least, modified w/ pullup assist and no body armor. It's still a crushing workout.

                          Comment


                          • #14







                            I started running 30 years ago, in med school, initially to lose weight and get in shape. I still run, but not as fast or as far and mix it with cycling, hiking, spinning, and elliptical. I still do a couple of trail races per year, nothing longer than 9-10 miles.

                            I do some weight lifting, but not enough, and I love yoga but rarely do it.

                            I got into skiing as an adult and never got good enough to enjoy as much as others do. As the cost of skiing rose, my level of interest fell in lockstep.

                            If you wanted to start running, I recommend joining a local group and training for a 5k. Stick it out until you have completed the the race, as it will be painful for a while. If you still don’t like it after the race, you might want to move on. Running is a great form of fitness because you can do it, literally, anywhere. I have run in Europe, Asia, and South America, in addition to many of the major cities and states in the U.S. It’s a great way to see places.
                            Click to expand…


                            Not a huge runner but I do incorporate it into my fitness routine.

                            The best thing about running is, like Vagabond said, you can do it anywhere. Basically when I’m on vacation or at a conference I just pack running shoes and a light running outfit. It’s an awesome way to explore a new area even at the 3-5 mile length. Training up to be able to run 4 miles at a comfortable pace is very doable in a few months.

                            On a more general note, I’ve been continuously working out since my first year of med school. I have tried all kinds of different stuff. I will tell you that as a guy the single best thing you can do IMHO is weight training. It seems to be the thing that actually accomplishes what we all want (body shape, fitness, wt loss, lack of pain). In the last few months I have dropped a lot of cardio in favor of squats and I couldn’t be happier.

                            I also do this once a week at least, modified w/ pullup assist and no body armor. It’s still a crushing workout.
                            Click to expand...


                            Everything has its place. Weights do one thing, cardio does another. Some are simply better or more efficient than others. I enjoy cycling the best for cardio, but if I really just need the workout I run since I can do similar effectiveness in 1/3rd the time or less. Also great to go places and just grab shoes and run, very cheap as well.

                            Weight loss is 100% diet. No one needs to work out at all to keep a good weight. I'd say working out sometimes makes it harder due to the hunger it can cause and how people mismatch their workout/food. So easy to out eat any workout.

                            Just finished setting up a little home gym to hit the basics and am pretty excited if I can even do semi regular workouts. When we were young fitness/strength transferred disciplines, now it certainly doesnt. In fact sometimes its a hindrance if you're fit and do something else because your body can physically do it even if you shouldnt.

                            I remember I was interviewing at Mayo and was stuck in the hotel (how do people live there), and was during very regular cycling and bike racing period for me, I hadnt ran in years. I went to hotel gym and ran like 8 miles, felt amazing. I woke up in excruciating pain, I could barely walk and it got worse the next couple days. I was probably near rhabdo lol, it was terrible. That was an age shock for sure. Didnt matter I was super fit and my legs were strong, that cycling only had concentric contractions and running has both eccentric/concentric absolutely crushed me. So sad.

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                            • #15
                              Thank you for all the comments ! Will try something's. Geography so important - jealous of folks near ski-able areas.

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