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How to deal with working for morons?

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  • VagabondMD
    replied










    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!
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    Did you line up something else?
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    Look before you leap and all that.
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    A stitch in time saves nine. (I am not sure how that proverb applies here, but while we are throwing out ageless words of wisdom... )

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  • Hank
    replied







    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!
    Click to expand…


    Did you line up something else?
    Click to expand...


    Look before you leap and all that.

    Leave a comment:


  • I Find This Humerus
    replied







    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!
    Click to expand…


    Did you line up something else?
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    Yup!

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  • Kamban
    replied




    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!
    Click to expand...


    Did you line up something else?

    Leave a comment:


  • VagabondMD
    replied




    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!
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    On to greener pastures. Good luck!

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  • I Find This Humerus
    replied
    Just put in for my resignation! Feels great!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bmac
    replied
    All joking aside, it really does seem like a reasonable idea to at least explore other employment locations/groups. The grass really might be greener.

    Leave a comment:


  • SerrateAndDominate
    replied
    Agreed.  Not to excuse the situation, but this case was a frozen to assess donor kidney.  I should have clarified that.  I did, however, use your example in my defense to make it a bigger deal.

     

    I also agree with what others are saying.  It's unfortunately common that those in leadership are out of touch with how things are.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lithium
    replied
    Most of us didn't go to medical school to be administrators.  On top of that, the pay sucks and you can make more seeing patients during that time.  You also get about 100 complaints for every "atta boy!"  Tilting at windmills for $125 an hour is not my idea of an enjoyable way to spend my extra time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zaphod
    replied




    I, myself, question how certain people have risen to the rank of leader while others haven’t. I suspect a similar sentiment is shared in all other fields as well. I think, in general, getting those leadership positions requires a combination of luck, timing, and a unique skill set that is often difficult to articulate and under-appreciated. Furthermore, networking and ‘playing the game’ requires significant energy, and is not necessarily as easy as it looks from the outside.
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    Sometimes it feels the "leaders" are the only ones left to fill the roles and have been around while people that are qualified have looked at the pros/cons and passed.

    And as you mention, often reasonable people simply dont want to 'play the game' while some do, and they fall into it naturally.

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  • Drsan1
    replied







    In my experience people don’t always start off as Morons. Some of them may have been very good clinicians in the past. When your life changes to meetings and spreadsheets they no longer think like a clinician. It may be good for you to climb the ladder one day, but without continuing to do patient care it is inevitable for perception to change. I speak from personal experience.

    Typically changing jobs (unless it is so bad your license or patient safety are in jeopardy) may make one thing better but worsen something else. I agree with whoever mentioned the Serenity prayer above. It wasn’t until about by 7/8 year that I realized I had to stay calm and some stuff was just how it was going to be. Good Luck.
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    Isn’t that called giving up?
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    Its more like pick your battles. Me personally I have given up. I've fought for about 7 years, now i focus only on the issues that are most important, I am soooo much happier and less stressed. I do my job, care for patients, get payed well and thoroughly enjoy my time off. Its easier said than done. Like I said it was a long process for me to get here.

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  • startupdoc
    replied
    I, myself, question how certain people have risen to the rank of leader while others haven't. I suspect a similar sentiment is shared in all other fields as well. I think, in general, getting those leadership positions requires a combination of luck, timing, and a unique skill set that is often difficult to articulate and under-appreciated. Furthermore, networking and 'playing the game' requires significant energy, and is not necessarily as easy as it looks from the outside.

    Leave a comment:


  • I Find This Humerus
    replied




    If you don’t respect them leave with adequate notice. Lack of social skills can land you in a malpractice situation.  Cross coverage with them can also end up there if they are not managing cases well. Pride in your work and the group practice is very important to avoid burn out
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    Could not agree more.

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  • I Find This Humerus
    replied




    I understand the OP’s sentiments.  I’ve had times where I’m not on call or back-up call yet I’ve had to go in and help with something because both the resident and attending did not know how to do an intraoperative consult frozen section.  I’m pretty bad about jumping to the negative emotions about the situation, but I tried to focus on more training for the resident.  As the for attending aspect of it, I was happy it was a certain attending who willfully acknowledged that she should have known how to perform a frozen section.  I tried to mention that all attendings (& residents) should know how to handle all aspects of our job, and a halfway decent lawyer would go to town had this situation gone bad.  It just fell on deaf ears.

    I’m still learning to take things for how they are.  You can still accept a situation for how it is, and as difficult as it may be, staying outwardly positive may slowly help you get more people to push for change.
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    I think we are similar-minded. But the problem is, if things did go south, now its your problem too and now you're getting sued as well. If I could practice independently of others that's a different story. But when group policies detrimentally affect what I deem to be good medicine they've now made it a problem for me. Not to mention ethics and responsibility to the patient. Would you want your loved one in the OR with docs that can't do everything that is required by their job?

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  • I Find This Humerus
    replied




    In my experience people don’t always start off as Morons. Some of them may have been very good clinicians in the past. When your life changes to meetings and spreadsheets they no longer think like a clinician. It may be good for you to climb the ladder one day, but without continuing to do patient care it is inevitable for perception to change. I speak from personal experience.

    Typically changing jobs (unless it is so bad your license or patient safety are in jeopardy) may make one thing better but worsen something else. I agree with whoever mentioned the Serenity prayer above. It wasn’t until about by 7/8 year that I realized I had to stay calm and some stuff was just how it was going to be. Good Luck.
    Click to expand...


    Isn't that called giving up?

    Leave a comment:

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