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  • A kerfuffle over $60? Do tell.

    Here's the story.

    I was solicited to participate in a phone interview for a pharma company. I was offered $350 per hour, prorated, for an anticipated 45-60 min interview.

    I responded that I would be happy to participate, but I would require the $350 (one hour) as a minimum. The study required me to be at a computer, at a specific time, and answering questions about a procedure that I have 20+ years experience doing. The surveying company thanked me for agreeing, we quickly scheduled a time, they called me, I was interviewed (it lasted about 50 minutes), I pointed out a MAJOR misunderstanding on their end, one that no one before had, they seemed appreciative, and we were done.

    Today, about 10 days later, I received a check in the mail for $290. I rechecked the email in which I agreed to participate, for $350 (minimum one hour), and while the survey coordinator never specifically addressed this point, she expressed appreciation for me responding and agreeing quickly, etc.

    So what would you do next (pick multiple, if applicable):

    A. Suck it up. Minor misunderstanding. Cash the check for $290. It is better than a sharp stick in the eye. It was probably my fault, anyway, for not specifically confirming the amount in an additional, separate email.

    B. Send an email to the survey coordinator pointing out the discrepancy between the check and the agreed upon amount.

    C. Send the check back to the survey company with a letter requesting the full $350. (Maybe smear something disgusting on the letter.)

    D. Disparage the survey company and the pharma company to everyone you know, including the peeps on the WCI forum, for being cheapskates, liars and cheaters.

    E. Tell your daughter that we can no longer afford the jeans that we bought her for Hanukkah, and they are going back to the store.

    F. Have your lawyer friend draw up a demand letter for $1500 (or $15,000, it's pharma, after all, deep pockets), for the mental anguish and loss of consortium over the breach of contract.

    G. Other (hopefully, something more practical or witty than A-F)

  • #2
    A + E ?

    Comment


    • #3
      A + be more irritated than I reasonably should be + next time demand 2 hours and refuse to participate until check is in hand.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don’t understand why someone as smart as you thinks that the person you spoke with initially cares whether you get 290 or 350 or is empowered to make that change. They get Paid per interview probably.

        Never do it again would be my recommendation. Your free time is worth $1000/ hour. Maybe more.

        Comment


        • #5

          I would choose B. If they refuse then never do another survey.  Agree with Qschool. Your time is valuable because we need your time here for more witty comments not wasting it on surveys.

          Comment


          • #6
            Option B. It'll take you a few minutes to type the email and send it. No matter the response, I wouldn't take it any further than that.

            Comment


            • #7
              B.

              It's not $60. It's $60(1+r)^n = something sweet in the future. It's also the principle.

              Comment


              • #8
                F, then another forum post about it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Send an email. My usual approach is to assume that it was an honest mistake and treat it as such (meaning I politely but firmly point out the error). By suggesting it was an error rather than deliberate they can save face with a correction. If they are not responsive I would at least ask if they routinely decline to pay for services rendered under the agreed upon terms.

                  I rather like doing these phone surveys. I have found them interesting and I like the money. However, I would quickly sour on them if they didn't pay as agreed.

                  Comment


                  • #10




                    I don’t understand why someone as smart as you thinks that the person you spoke with initially cares whether you get 290 or 350 or is empowered to make that change. They get Paid per interview probably.

                    Never do it again would be my recommendation. Your free time is worth $1000/ hour. Maybe more.
                    Click to expand...


                    Care to show your work on this?

                    $1000/hr roughly equates to to a $2 million/year full time job.

                    I can see various reasons why you wouldn't exactly convert it in this way and apply a premium for the free time, but still, that's quite a lot

                    I suppose its possible that Vagabond could be extremely wealthy with a very high income, in which case, your claim is tenable.  But if his free time was truly worth anywhere near that, there is no way he is agreeing for $350.

                    Comment


                    • #11




                      Here’s the story.

                      I was solicited to participate in a phone interview for a pharma company. I was offered $350 per hour, prorated, for an anticipated 45-60 min interview.

                      I responded that I would be happy to participate, but I would require the $350 (one hour) as a minimum. The study required me to be at a computer, at a specific time, and answering questions about a procedure that I have 20+ years experience doing. The surveying company thanked me for agreeing, we quickly scheduled a time, they called me, I was interviewed (it lasted about 50 minutes), I pointed out a MAJOR misunderstanding on their end, one that no one before had, they seemed appreciative, and we were done.

                      Today, about 10 days later, I received a check in the mail for $290. I rechecked the email in which I agreed to participate, for $350 (minimum one hour), and while the survey coordinator never specifically addressed this point, she expressed appreciation for me responding and agreeing quickly, etc.

                      So what would you do next (pick multiple, if applicable):

                      A. Suck it up. Minor misunderstanding. Cash the check for $290. It is better than a sharp stick in the eye. It was probably my fault, anyway, for not specifically confirming the amount in an additional, separate email.

                      B. Send an email to the survey coordinator pointing out the discrepancy between the check and the agreed upon amount.

                      C. Send the check back to the survey company with a letter requesting the full $350. (Maybe smear something disgusting on the letter.)

                      D. Disparage the survey company and the pharma company to everyone you know, including the peeps on the WCI forum, for being cheapskates, liars and cheaters.

                      E. Tell your daughter that we can no longer afford the jeans that we bought her for Hanukkah, and they are going back to the store.

                      F. Have your lawyer friend draw up a demand letter for $1500 (or $15,000, it’s pharma, after all, deep pockets), for the mental anguish and loss of consortium over the breach of contract.

                      G. Other (hopefully, something more practical or witty than A-F)
                      Click to expand...


                      Since the interview was 50 minutes and you were paid $350/hr, you should invoice them for the additional $1.67 they still owe you.

                      -WSP

                      Comment


                      • #12






                         
                        Click to expand…


                        Since the interview was 50 minutes and you were paid $350/hr, you should invoice them for the additional $1.67 they still owe you.

                        -WSP
                        Click to expand...


                        Sending them a super fancy and formal invoice for 1/6 of an hour with a additional line items for "late payment penalty" and "processing fee" would be kind of hilarious and the kind of thing I would do.

                         

                        Comment


                        • #13







                          I don’t understand why someone as smart as you thinks that the person you spoke with initially cares whether you get 290 or 350 or is empowered to make that change. They get Paid per interview probably.

                          Never do it again would be my recommendation. Your free time is worth $1000/ hour. Maybe more.
                          Click to expand…


                          Care to show your work on this?

                           
                          Click to expand...


                          After the Medicare discount he only gets the $350?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            B, send the email. It will take 1 minute, yielding an hourly return of $3600 ($60x60). QED

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I sent an email (before I posted this thread). It was mostly polite, but I did add one mildly snarky comment.

                              The $350/hour interviews are well worth my time (sorry, Hatton), but I have been ignoring the $17 for 25 minute online grilling sessions with lots of questions to answer, eventually leading to the place, 20 minutes into it, where I learn that my browser is incompatible, and I cannot finish the study. It’s more useful for me to spend that time here on the forum.

                              Comment

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