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What are the odds you will be healthy, vigorous, and sharp til age 75?

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  • #91
    Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post
    Since there's no way to know for sure, how do you plan?

    Part time work seems like a good answer but some fields don't suit that well. I like what WCI said though: once you have enough money, don't you dare trade your health for more of it.
    I think that's the answer. Find something you REALLY want to do and do it. Then cross your fingers. If the worst does happen, at least you didn't waste your limited time doing something you hated.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by artemis View Post

      I think that's the answer. Find something you REALLY want to do and do it. Then cross your fingers. If the worst does happen, at least you didn't waste your limited time doing something you hated.
      What percentage of all humans in all of history has enjoyed "doing" their dream job/passion? .001%? I think well being comes from within. And that's generally a struggle in itself.

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      • #93
        Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post
        We got off topic by discussing all the things we can do to improve our odds. Yes we should do those things. But there is a significant element of chance which was really the point of my question. Like Lake Wobegon we believe we're all above average . But guaranteed some on this board, even some apparently healthy folks doing all the right things, are going to get unlucky. How do you account for this in your planning? Put money aside, what about how you allot your time on short (day to day) or long (decade to decade) time scales?

        If I live to a healthy 90 I have way more to give in my late 40s. But if I develop Parkinson's at age 60 I should have retired already.

        Since there's no way to know for sure, how do you plan?

        Part time work seems like a good answer but some fields don't suit that well. I like what WCI said though: once you have enough money, don't you dare trade your health for more of it.
        Answer three questions and you will have YOUR answer.
        https://thephysicianphilosopher.com/...der-questions/
        There really is no “right” answer. A wheelchair at 45 might be your choice. Quality of life is about as individual as you can get.

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        • #94
          Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post
          But guaranteed some on this board, even some apparently healthy folks doing all the right things, are going to get unlucky. How do you account for this in your planning? Put money aside, what about how you allot your time on short (day to day) or long (decade to decade) time scales?

          Since there's no way to know for sure, how do you plan?
          I can't say I planned any of this, but this is how I've done it:

          From 18-35 my focus was on lifting, dancing, clubbing, and lovers. I was out all the time. I met everyone and did everything. I didn't focus on my career anymore than I focused on brushing my teeth; it was a necessary chore that occupied enough of my attention to accomplish the task, not more.

          I took a year between college and med school to do something I loved, then took a year between 34-35 to travel, ski, surf, dive, hang-glide (tandem), and fail at writing a novel. I stepped away from medicine for 13 years in my 40s and early 50s to wander through life doing whatever seemed interesting at the time.

          For the last 8 years I've been working a lot, and now work has my full attention. I hated my career when I was younger, but I appreciate it now. Discarding call has a lot to do with that, but I think declining testosterone can claim the lion's share of the credit.

          So, to the extent you have anything in common with me, I recommend you burn the candle at both ends doing all the things that are meaningful to you while young, and/or "retire" young in order to work in older age. Work (knowledge work) fits better on an older body.

          I was always the healthy person doing all the right things, but I suffered two serious (non-lifestyle) illnesses in my 50s, and my best friend from high school and college, another healthy person doing all the right things, died at 57. I'm well aware I could die tomorrow, but that doesn't make me want to quit work because working and planning for a long life feels right at the moment.
          Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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