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What are the odds you will be healthy, vigorous, and sharp til age 75?

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  • #61
    Good thread.

    Anne with the running analogy thats me now. I used to be real fast, then stopped running for a few years while dealing with other things. A charity 5k has got me back into trying again, but I'm so disappointed in my times that I almost stopped (if it werent for my wife's cancer research I wouldnt have kept my promise to run). I get bored going slow, and now I am slow (in my head). But I started reading The Happy Runner that a friend sent me so that I can be ok with slower times/longer distances and actually not hurting myself at the same time.

    But this thread reminded me of a quote my late wife had highlighted in her phone- "The goal is to die with memories, not dreams". So dont forget to do stuff you enjoy now while also planning for later. Bc later is not guaranteed. In her final talks re:hospice she mentioned that she cant do the things she wants to anymore, but she was happy she was able to do everything that she wanted to do in life- enjoy the beach travel friends etc. So as long as I get to the point where dementia kicks in having crossed off my bucket list, I'll be satisfied.

    JBME​​​​​​​ artemis certain specialties allow the slow down style despite being an employee- its actually easier in anesthesia to do that as an employee than as a partner bc then there is no "who will pick up the missed calls" conversations- per diem, locums, or just daytime /part time are all available to employees but certain private groups will harbor extreme prejudice to a partner wanting to cut back or slow down. Or maybe the partners have unrealistic visions of maintaining a certain control in the group I dunno.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by billy View Post
      Good thread.JBME artemis certain specialties allow the slow down style despite being an employee- its actually easier in anesthesia to do that as an employee than as a partner bc then there is no "who will pick up the missed calls" conversations- per diem, locums, or just daytime /part time are all available to employees but certain private groups will harbor extreme prejudice to a partner wanting to cut back or slow down. Or maybe the partners have unrealistic visions of maintaining a certain control in the group I dunno.
      I think there's a lot of variation across specialties and across practices when it comes to how easy it is to cut back on hours. But of course the option to do something else other than medicine is always there, if you're bold enough to take it.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by billy View Post
        Good thread.

        Anne with the running analogy thats me now. I used to be real fast, then stopped running for a few years while dealing with other things. A charity 5k has got me back into trying again, but I'm so disappointed in my times that I almost stopped (if it werent for my wife's cancer research I wouldnt have kept my promise to run). I get bored going slow, and now I am slow (in my head). But I started reading The Happy Runner that a friend sent me so that I can be ok with slower times/longer distances and actually not hurting myself at the same time.

        But this thread reminded me of a quote my late wife had highlighted in her phone- "The goal is to die with memories, not dreams". So dont forget to do stuff you enjoy now while also planning for later. Bc later is not guaranteed. In her final talks re:hospice she mentioned that she cant do the things she wants to anymore, but she was happy she was able to do everything that she wanted to do in life- enjoy the beach travel friends etc. So as long as I get to the point where dementia kicks in having crossed off my bucket list, I'll be satisfied.

        JBME artemis certain specialties allow the slow down style despite being an employee- its actually easier in anesthesia to do that as an employee than as a partner bc then there is no "who will pick up the missed calls" conversations- per diem, locums, or just daytime /part time are all available to employees but certain private groups will harbor extreme prejudice to a partner wanting to cut back or slow down. Or maybe the partners have unrealistic visions of maintaining a certain control in the group I dunno.
        the general assumption is that if you're a W2 you don't have much control. You do have more control as the employer than as the employee, I agree, but even W2 people have some control. My wife just cut back to .9 FTE as a W2. It was never an issue. She may eventually cut back to .75 or .7. If they don't let her, she'll look somewhere else. That's control W2 employees have....if they don't like it it's not like there aren't any other jobs out there they can try to get. They have plenty of autonomy still

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        • #64
          Originally posted by billy View Post
          certain private groups will harbor extreme prejudice to a partner wanting to cut back or slow down. Or maybe the partners have unrealistic visions of maintaining a certain control in the group I dunno.
          My experience in PP was the resentment was due to not wanting extra work or call duties if someone cut back. Not necessarily ill will, just that your happiness shouldn’t come with an extra burden for the remaining partners. Far better to completely leave and be replaced with an employee on a partnership track. On the flip side, some partners trying to cut back maintain an unrealistic compensation expectation given less hours, less call, more days off and a certain amount of fixed expenses that are necessary regardless of work status. It cuts both ways which is why it can be difficult to negotiate the slow road to paradise.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by burritos View Post

            No doubt smaller people have advantages, but when it comes to competing and besting others in physical feats/competition... well there's a reason why smaller people generally aren't out competing bigger stronger foes at a high clip.
            Speed kills. Even on full court basketball the only disadvantage is rebounding. I can't really think of a competition other than those with weight limits where size advantage is significantly reduced.

            Full disclosure: Larry Bird would demolish you and I in a 2 v 1 game. Not size, skill. He was never fast. To what sports or competitions are you referring ?

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            • #66
              Originally posted by GasFIRE View Post
              On the flip side, some partners trying to cut back maintain an unrealistic compensation expectation given less hours, less call, more days off and a certain amount of fixed expenses that are necessary regardless of work status.
              This is especially true for malpractice insurance and health insurance. The costs of those don't decline with fewer hours worked, which people who want to cut back need to be aware of; the seemingly disproportionate decline in paycheck is often due to the fact that those two fixed costs make up an increased amount of one's total compensation.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Tim View Post

                Speed kills. Even on full court basketball the only disadvantage is rebounding. I can't really think of a competition other than those with weight limits where size advantage is significantly reduced.

                Full disclosure: Larry Bird would demolish you and I in a 2 v 1 game. Not size, skill. He was never fast. To what sports or competitions are you referring ?
                Football, basketball, track and field, climbing, swimming. I think mostly bigger people do better. Obviously not in the extreme cases. But not too many smaller people dominating in these sports.

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                • #68
                  I'm very fortunate in the gene arena. Both my parents are in their 90's and living on their own. My 91 year old father helped me put up an 8' tall deer fence around a garden plot yesterday! He is incredible. He's a retired ER Doc. My grandma lived to be 2 weeks shy of 103. So yes, I plan on living into my 90s. But, who can say, I may die in a car accident tomorrow. Life is full of surprises.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by K82 View Post
                    I'm very fortunate in the gene arena. Both my parents are in their 90's and living on their own. My 91 year old father helped me put up an 8' tall deer fence around a garden plot yesterday! He is incredible. He's a retired ER Doc. My grandma lived to be 2 weeks shy of 103. So yes, I plan on living into my 90s. But, who can say, I may die in a car accident tomorrow. Life is full of surprises.
                    Yes longevity genes are worth its weight in gold. The question is can you hack into this phenotype?

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by burritos View Post

                      Football, basketball, track and field, climbing, swimming. I think mostly bigger people do better. Obviously not in the extreme cases. But not too many smaller people dominating in these sports.
                      Depends on what track and field. Little guys often dominate in long distance running. Meb is 65”

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by burritos View Post

                        Football, basketball, track and field, climbing, swimming. I think mostly bigger people do better. Obviously not in the extreme cases. But not too many smaller people dominating in these sports.
                        Check out the senior games, all comers meets, or any age groups leagues. Not aware of any football leagues. You might find some 7 man games. No lineman. Run and shoot all day long. Even in high school 7 man is a fast game, size is neutralized. No linemen.
                        As far as track, their are two events that favor size, both field events. The shot and discus. Size and bulk actually are disadvantages.
                        Pick up basketball or leagues where older compete aren’t post up games for big men . Run and gun.
                        Swimming is technique.
                        Sorry, naming a sport don’t count. Mid to older sports don’t depend on size.
                        You forgot one. Older mens softball. Haul the meat to the plate and hit homers. Size matters lifting that ball a long way.
                        Tennis? You aren’t winning on just serving aces.
                        Keeping the ball in play. Yep, speed expands your range. I know a 60 year old that pitches for a team of college aged kids. Got some junk and a little speed. This is NOT one of those aspiring prospect leagues. About 5’6.
                        BTW, congrats on your new PR’s. Skills improvement is my guess.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Tim View Post

                          Check out the senior games, all comers meets, or any age groups leagues. Not aware of any football leagues. You might find some 7 man games. No lineman. Run and shoot all day long. Even in high school 7 man is a fast game, size is neutralized. No linemen.
                          As far as track, their are two events that favor size, both field events. The shot and discus. Size and bulk actually are disadvantages.
                          Pick up basketball or leagues where older compete aren’t post up games for big men . Run and gun.
                          Swimming is technique.
                          Sorry, naming a sport don’t count. Mid to older sports don’t depend on size.
                          You forgot one. Older mens softball. Haul the meat to the plate and hit homers. Size matters lifting that ball a long way.
                          Tennis? You aren’t winning on just serving aces.
                          Keeping the ball in play. Yep, speed expands your range. I know a 60 year old that pitches for a team of college aged kids. Got some junk and a little speed. This is NOT one of those aspiring prospect leagues. About 5’6.
                          BTW, congrats on your new PR’s. Skills improvement is my guess.
                          Then I have hope. Thanks for sharing and correcting my inferiority complex way of thinking.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by burritos View Post

                            Then I have hope. Thanks for sharing and correcting my inferiority complex way of thinking.
                            Hey, a guy 100 years old just ran the 100 meter dash at the Penn Relays.
                            https://olympics.nbcsports.com/2022/...er-wright/amp/
                            World records are starting to seem likely in your future. Try race walking. Weird event, but actually difficult. You will smoke ‘em in the last 100 with your finishing kick.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Lordosis View Post
                              Some light googling has shown me at about 30% of people live to be 90. That seems like a high enough percentage to make me want to prepare for it.

                              ​​​​​
                              I remember reading somewhere that if you make it to 70, your chance of making it to 90 is about 70%. This always stuck with me and makes a lot of sense. Better plan for it.

                              I've been practicing in Florida for the past 28 years. The number of healthy, active and vital 90 year old people I know is really remarkable.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Tim View Post

                                Hey, a guy 100 years old just ran the 100 meter dash at the Penn Relays.
                                https://olympics.nbcsports.com/2022/...er-wright/amp/
                                World records are starting to seem likely in your future. Try race walking. Weird event, but actually difficult. You will smoke ‘em in the last 100 with your finishing kick.


                                Without and physicial exam or bloodwork biometrics, based on this 70 year olds ability to do 400 consecutive full ab rollers, do you think he has the same mortality/morbidity risk as your typical 70 year old western male who's LDL is at 100 controlled by a statin and A1C at 5.4% controlled with metformin? I've got 18 more years to go and I'm up to 15. Don't think I'll catch him, but hopefully my 55 y/o self will be able to crush my 52 y/o self.
                                Last edited by burritos; 05-11-2022, 06:33 AM.

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