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Are having stairs in your home good for your health?

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  • #76
    Originally posted by Kamban View Post

    I agree. My thought was that instead of the solar panel law in CA this might be more useful for the citizens of USA. And I am somewhat pro climate.

    It was just a musing.
    Used to be pro climate. Now I'm ambivalent. And I have batteries, solar, 2 EV's, whole house fan, 3 composters, 5 rain barrels, and bike to work. But anyone not seeing the inevitable total release of fossil fuel carbon into the atmosphere is demonstrating willful ignorance. I otoh am demonstrating willful acceptance.

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    • #77
      Originally posted by AR View Post

      Well, there is a wide range of ability between needing caregivers to take care of personal hygiene and just not wanting to climb stairs because your knees hurt.
      https://www.healthline.com/health/pa...OC_TITLE_HDR_1

      Strengthening the knee is one way to prevent knee trouble and deal with a knee condition you already have. One exercise that’s simple to do is stair climbing.
      I know. Cherry picked and likely unconvincing to 99% of all knee pain sufferers. But could be true. But if it were true, it still would unconvincing and likely triggering to most westerners used to comfort.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by burritos View Post

        https://www.healthline.com/health/pa...OC_TITLE_HDR_1



        I know. Cherry picked and likely unconvincing to 99% of all knee pain sufferers. But could be true. But if it were true, it still would unconvincing and likely triggering to most westerners used to comfort.
        Weight-bearing exercises make osteoarthritis worse, not better. And not everybody with mobility problems is dealing with a joint issue. Balance issues can also cause problems with stairs.

        You may not want to accept reality, but your physical capacities WILL decline with age. The degree of decline varies from person to person, but it happens to everybody. Exercise, while it is good for us, is not the fountain of youth.
        Last edited by artemis; 04-11-2022, 05:42 PM.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by artemis View Post

          Weight-bearing exercises made osteoarthritis worse, not better. And not everybody with mobility problems is dealing with a joint issue. Balance issues can also cause problems with stairs.

          You may not want to accept reality, but your physical capacities WILL decline with age. The degree of decline varies from person to person, but it happens to everybody. Exercise, while it is good for us, is not the fountain of youth.
          Western medicine is the fountain of youth. That's why we spend 4 trillion on it a year. When adjusted to inflation, that's how much the Spanish empire funded Ponce de Leon.

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          • #80
            Originally posted by burritos View Post

            https://www.healthline.com/health/pa...OC_TITLE_HDR_1



            I know. Cherry picked and likely unconvincing to 99% of all knee pain sufferers. But could be true. But if it were true, it still would unconvincing and likely triggering to most westerners used to comfort.
            Have you seen kneesovertoesguy?

            backward sled pull and split squats. He makes a lot of sense

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            • #81
              Originally posted by pierre View Post

              Have you seen kneesovertoesguy?

              backward sled pull and split squats. He makes a lot of sense
              Because of him I do 10 full nordic hamstring curls a day(no pillows).

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              • #82
                Originally posted by childay View Post
                Everyone has a plan until they fall and get a hip fracture?
                Yes, I see it at work at least weekly... fall down stairs and concussion, fracture, contusions, etc.

                If you have stairs inside or outside, put the clear or black or whatever type of sandpaper grip tape strips onto them.

                I myself had a biceps insertion tendon partial rupture from slip down wood stairs wearing socks during med school (tried to catch and stop myself from sliding down the stairs with the arm). I was fortunate it didn't need surgery.

                The common sense thing is to simply have a dog to walk or just take walks daily, hikes on weekends, gym regular, etc. Have an active-minded partner and social group. Use a stand-up desk. Take lunch walks and get sunshine instead of loafing on the screen. Be active in any reasonable forms.

                The setup of your home doesn't matter much... basement stairs, front porch or back deck stairs can all cause problems. Stairs in a multi-level house are more harm than good (and will also cost you more risk and $ and damage when moving).

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by artemis View Post

                  Weight-bearing exercises make osteoarthritis worse, not better. And not everybody with mobility problems is dealing with a joint issue. Balance issues can also cause problems with stairs.

                  You may not want to accept reality, but your physical capacities WILL decline with age. The degree of decline varies from person to person, but it happens to everybody. Exercise, while it is good for us, is not the fountain of youth.
                  So I usually agree with you, but your first paragraph is untrue. Plenty of studies show improvement in OA with regards to function and pain with weight bearing exercise. Plus, exercise also helps balance!

                  Not everyone who exercises will grow old gracefully. But if one does not exercise, there is a very low chance that they will age well. There is no such thing as a fountain of youth, but as my dad likes to say “once you stop exercising, that’s when they start digging the hole”

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                  • #84
                    Can we all at least agree that split level houses were a terrible idea?

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by artemis View Post

                      Weight-bearing exercises make osteoarthritis worse, not better. And not everybody with mobility problems is dealing with a joint issue. Balance issues can also cause problems with stairs.

                      You may not want to accept reality, but your physical capacities WILL decline with age. The degree of decline varies from person to person, but it happens to everybody. Exercise, while it is good for us, is not the fountain of youth.
                      I know everyone is different. But using your expertise/opinion/law of averages can you proffer a general guessitmate at what age is the event horizon when age related pathophysiological decline is a certainty?

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by Hank View Post
                        Can we all at least agree that split level houses were a terrible idea?
                        My nearly 80-year-old father-in-law moved into one. Even crazier is that it is a age restricted community (only 50 and up allowed) and nearly every single house in there is a split level.

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by burritos View Post

                          I know everyone is different. But using your expertise/opinion/law of averages can you proffer a general guessitmate at what age is the event horizon when age related pathophysiological decline is a certainty?
                          40

                          But when I hit 40 I will change my opinion to 50

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by burritos View Post

                            I know everyone is different. But using your expertise/opinion/law of averages can you proffer a general guessitmate at what age is the event horizon when age related pathophysiological decline is a certainty?
                            There’s so much variation between individuals that it is hard to give a good guesstimate, but from what I have seen for most people the transition appears to occur sometime after age 75-80.

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                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Anne View Post

                              So I usually agree with you, but your first paragraph is untrue. Plenty of studies show improvement in OA with regards to function and pain with weight bearing exercise. Plus, exercise also helps balance!

                              Not everyone who exercises will grow old gracefully. But if one does not exercise, there is a very low chance that they will age well. There is no such thing as a fountain of youth, but as my dad likes to say “once you stop exercising, that’s when they start digging the hole”
                              You seem to think I am anti-exercise. I am not. But osteoarthritis is an excessive wear injury. The joint cartilage is wearing away, and it will not regrow. Putting an osteoarthritic joint under compressive load thinking it will help the arthritis is like driving a car with worn brake pads around town doing a lot of braking because somehow this will help the brake pads regenerate. It just makes things worse. The best exercise for an osteoarthritic joint is exercise that puts the joint through a full range of motion, but without subjecting it to a compressive load. This is why exercises like cycling/spin class, swimming, and water aerobics and water weight training are so popular with older people. They permit an excellent cardio workout, a reasonable amount of resistance training, and put the joints through a full range of motion, but without forcing the joints to bear additional weight which will cause the cartilage to wear faster.
                              And I agree that exercise helps with balance, but if someone is dealing with a neurological condition the improvement may not be enough to make stairs safe.

                              if you go back to burritos’ first post on this thread, he starts off with saying “aside from falling down the stairs” when question of whether having stairs in the house is a health benefit. That’s a pretty big aside to include when talking about older people. One big reason why older people prefer to avoid stairs in their houses is because if they do fall down them, they are more likely to be seriously injured than a younger person would be.

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by Hank View Post
                                Can we all at least agree that split level houses were a terrible idea?
                                You’ll get no argument from me there!

                                I think it is easy to forget that for most of history the physically disabled were “out of sight, out of mind,” and older house designs reflect that. For much of history, if somebody became severely physically disabled, they became a shut in if they could not manage stairs, curbs, etc. Society at large made no effort to accommodate these people. Heck, the Americans with Disabilities Act, which feels like it has been around forever, was only passed in 1990. Now we are more aware of disability and more determined to make spaces accessible to the disabled, And newer home designs (which feature first floor full bedrooms and bathrooms and wider hallways and doorways) have changed accordingly.


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