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Are having stairs in your home good for your health?

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  • #46
    I don't know about stairs in the house being meaningful but I will say "old" in my mind is when lower body muscles atrophy to the point where weakness affects someone's ability to ambulate. In my own life, that was usually the first sign that the end was coming which still could be years away but you get what I mean. I can squat 315lbs in sets at 43 and my goal is to at least be doing bodyweight squats into my later years.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by E5797 View Post
      If I move again, I will try to pick a one story house. I grew up in a two story house and it seems natural. My first place after residency was a condo with the primary bedroom/bath/laundry room on the main floor. I bought an older two story house with basement laundry, no bedrooms on the first floor, and a half bath on first floor. I miss one floor living.
      Tangential but here I go anyway - I lived in a large 3600sqft ranch along CTs "gold coast". Great house, great yard, most of it was renovated and updated, great neighborhood with all the amenities, and a total PITA to sell in what was a hot market. Even at a discount based on sqft, everyone wanted a traditional colonial. It took a year to sell that house and we watched colonials in the neighborhood that were more expensive, smaller, and needed quite a bit of work sell in 1-2 months.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by PWMDMD View Post

        Tangential but here I go anyway - I lived in a large 3600sqft ranch along CTs "gold coast". Great house, great yard, most of it was renovated and updated, great neighborhood with all the amenities, and a total PITA to sell in what was a hot market. Even at a discount based on sqft, everyone wanted a traditional colonial. It took a year to sell that house and we watched colonials in the neighborhood that were more expensive, smaller, and needed quite a bit of work sell in 1-2 months.
        There is a lesson in there somewhere. Sometimes unique and personal preference in a buyers mind that turns out being a mistake.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by PWMDMD View Post
          I don't know about stairs in the house being meaningful but I will say "old" in my mind is when lower body muscles atrophy to the point where weakness affects someone's ability to ambulate. In my own life, that was usually the first sign that the end was coming which still could be years away but you get what I mean. I can squat 315lbs in sets at 43 and my goal is to at least be doing bodyweight squats into my later years.
          Bolded is pretty impressive. It was once a goal of mine, but I never made it there. Just started too late in life and never lifted frequently enough.

          Also, I don't think weakness is the dominant factor in these people avoiding stairs. Apparently a lot of people are suggesting that it is arthritis. So no matter how strong your quads, glutes, and hammies are, if your knees are real bad, stairs are going to hurt. I don't know that squatting heavy is protective against that too. I think it probably is, but I've heard people argue the opposite view.

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          • #50
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            Bolded is pretty impressive. It was once a goal of mine, but I never made it there. Just started too late in life and never lifted frequently enough.

            Also, I don't think weakness is the dominant factor in these people avoiding stairs. Apparently a lot of people are suggesting that it is arthritis. So no matter how strong your quads, glutes, and hammies are, if your knees are real bad, stairs are going to hurt. I don't know that squatting heavy is protective against that too. I think it probably is, but I've heard people argue the opposite view.

            [/QUOTE]

            I can bench 315lbs in sets too but, well, I'm 6'5" and 275lbs so that's just slightly more than bodyweight and so not all that impressive. I haven't missed more than 2-weeks of lifting in over 8 years so I'm pretty consistent. In that time I've had two minor injuries and I have no chronic issues - not even any minor niggles. Muscles feel strong, joints feel strong, and my mind feels relaxed. My goal was to get into this BEFORE I suffered from any arthropathy or other chronic issues. Now, I just want to stay active but don't overdo it. As I get older I'm moving away from low rep/high weight to higher rep/lower weight.



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            • #51
              Still not too shabby. Most humans your age/height/weight couldn't do it. I was shooting to be able to do it at 85kg bw and I didn't get close. That was right before I had first kid. Then the frequency went down.

              I'm definitely a big fan of the home gym setup. If it weren't for that I wouldn't lift at all.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by PWMDMD View Post
                I don't know about stairs in the house being meaningful but I will say "old" in my mind is when lower body muscles atrophy to the point where weakness affects someone's ability to ambulate. In my own life, that was usually the first sign that the end was coming which still could be years away but you get what I mean. I can squat 315lbs in sets at 43 and my goal is to at least be doing bodyweight squats into my later years.
                Impressive!

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by PWMDMD View Post
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_3198 copy.jpg
Views:	112
Size:	770.3 KB
ID:	328386QUOTE=AR;n328373]

                  Bolded is pretty impressive. It was once a goal of mine, but I never made it there. Just started too late in life and never lifted frequently enough.

                  Also, I don't think weakness is the dominant factor in these people avoiding stairs. Apparently a lot of people are suggesting that it is arthritis. So no matter how strong your quads, glutes, and hammies are, if your knees are real bad, stairs are going to hurt. I don't know that squatting heavy is protective against that too. I think it probably is, but I've heard people argue the opposite view.
                  I can bench 315lbs in sets too but, well, I'm 6'5" and 275lbs so that's just slightly more than bodyweight and so not all that impressive. I haven't missed more than 2-weeks of lifting in over 8 years so I'm pretty consistent. In that time I've had two minor injuries and I have no chronic issues - not even any minor niggles. Muscles feel strong, joints feel strong, and my mind feels relaxed. My goal was to get into this BEFORE I suffered from any arthropathy or other chronic issues. Now, I just want to stay active but don't overdo it. As I get older I'm moving away from low rep/high weight to higher rep/lower weight.



                  ​[/QUOTE]

                  I’ll see your six pack and raise you a pony keg!

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Hank View Post

                    I can bench 315lbs in sets too but, well, I'm 6'5" and 275lbs so that's just slightly more than bodyweight and so not all that impressive. I haven't missed more than 2-weeks of lifting in over 8 years so I'm pretty consistent. In that time I've had two minor injuries and I have no chronic issues - not even any minor niggles. Muscles feel strong, joints feel strong, and my mind feels relaxed. My goal was to get into this BEFORE I suffered from any arthropathy or other chronic issues. Now, I just want to stay active but don't overdo it. As I get older I'm moving away from low rep/high weight to higher rep/lower weight.



                    I’ll see your six pack and raise you a pony keg![/QUOTE]

                    While I have some decent mass there’s definitely no six pack under there!

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Hank View Post
                      Socks plus steps equals danger. Wood floors are slippery with socks, carpet is slippery with socks, brick or tile is slightly less slippery with socks, but hurts more when you land on it.

                      My house is a ranch, all on one level. From the garage, you have to step up onto a meter square pad of concrete, then step up one more time to get into the main. (Two steps total to get inside.) I doubt the lack of stairs to a second, third, or fourth floor is keeping me from getting the exercise I need to be alert and fit after age 95.

                      If you're building or buying a house for the long term, you should have at least one master bedroom and full bath on the ground floor. Or a full bath and a room you reasonably could convert to a private bedroom. If you're going to pricier custom home construction, consider putting in the elevator shaft now even if you don't install the elevator today.

                      A little bit of google-fu suggest that commercial elevators are around 22 square feet. Set that aside as a shaft, drywall off the access, and consider putting in temporary floorboards so if your little hoodlums (cherubic offspring) punch or run through the drywall, they won't fall down an empty elevator shaft and become a para- or a quadriplegic. (Ironically, if they get paralyzed they'll need an elevator to get upstairs.)
                      We built a new home 8 years ago and did this. We have the elevator shaft in place from the basement up to the second floor. Its being used as closet space now but if we ever need to put an elevator in, its no problem. We considered putting one in when we built but our state requires annual elevator inspections which have to be done by a certified company, for a fee. We figured we would cross that bridge down the road if we needed.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by PWMDMD View Post

                        While I have some decent mass there’s definitely no six pack under there!

                        You probably do, but it's just buried way down there. I've come across a few dudes that lift heavy and then decide to really cut and drop some weight for one reason or another. Once that fat goes away, they generally have very well developed abs with no specific ab work. Heavy squats and DLs work those more than people realize.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Lordosis View Post
                          We are talking about a flight of stairs people. If you can't walk up a flight of stairs because of a long-term condition chances are you probably should move to someplace more appropriate. Luckily we will all likely have the means to do this. Not everybody is so lucky I understand. But I'm not going to preemptively buy a one-floor home because there is a chance that I become a quadriplegic. I get that everybody will get old and have problems sooner or later but that is definitely a problem I'm going to pass off to Future me a deal with him 40-50 years.
                          I came to this thread late, but it struck a cord because this issue actually is a source of occasional debate around the kitchen table. Our place is a traditional colonial. No bedrooms, and only a half bath on the main floor. Have seen plenty of friends and family get injured or age into situations where a main floor bedroom/bath would be helpful. The debate at our place is about whether or not it makes sense to do something about it proactively. I think our bottom line is no, not in the current place and yes if we buy another one, but this will not be the issue that drives us to move. (And if you suspect my better half disagrees with me, you are correct!)

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Larry Ragman View Post
                            I came to this thread late, but it struck a cord because this issue actually is a source of occasional debate around the kitchen table. Our place is a traditional colonial. No bedrooms, and only a half bath on the main floor. Have seen plenty of friends and family get injured or age into situations where a main floor bedroom/bath would be helpful. The debate at our place is about whether or not it makes sense to do something about it proactively.
                            One thing to remember is that it is a lot easier to move at age 60 and then it is to move at age 80 (especially if you have been living in the house for many years and have accumulated a lot of stuff). 80 year olds just don’t have the same energy level as a 60 year old, and it is not just physical flexibility which declines with aging. Many older people who do have the means to move to a safer setting refuse to do so for reasons that are purely psychological/emotional, and sometimes they pay a terrible price for their stubbornness.

                            Edited to add: I have a friend who is currently dealing with this issue with her own aging parents, who are in their late 70s. Her mother has fallen down the stairs at least four times over the past year, and they live in a split level where stairs are completely unavoidable. But her parents do not want to move. The problem, of course, is that if her mother is seriously injured in one of these falls and develops a mobility issue as a result, they will HAVE to move, as the house is completely unworkable for someone in a wheelchair or using a walker. Realistically, her parents’ choice is to move to a more suitable house now, or be forced to move on very short notice in the future. But her mother refuses to see that. It is not a good situation, and it is causing my friend a great deal of stress.
                            Last edited by artemis; 04-10-2022, 07:33 AM.

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                            • #59
                              When I moved about 3 years ago getting a downstairs master was my main goal. I have 2 steps up from my garage into my house. I do have a second floor but it is bonus space over the garage. I think the house could be adapted for a walker or wheelchair. If I need these tho I will move to assisted living.

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                              • #60
                                https://www.yahoo.com/news/science-m...160609359.html

                                Everything from gardening to walking up stairs to dancing will burn more calories and all help in achieving that crucial calorie deficit.
                                Am a big fan of gardening.

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