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  • Lasik

    Anyone here get LASIK in their 50s?

    What’s the pros and cons with reading glasses and aging and surgery? Does possible cataract in later age come into play with with? My guess is not.

    Anyone have LASIK at an early age and then repeated it say like 15 years later?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    My wife had it about 10 years ago in her 20s. So far so good. I will let you know in another 10-15 years.

    https://youtu.be/o9IpsZFCZcI

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    • #3
      TL;DR. If you just get LASIK for routine myopia there is still a chance you might need reading glasses, bifocals, or conventional glasses in the future as you and your eyes age.

      My experience: underwent lasik at age 38 for myopia (I think I was -10 diopters OU). I was counseled by ophthalmologist that any of the above scenarios could occur in 15-20 years, and sure enough, now in my mid-50’s, I use glasses and progressive bifocals for night driving and sitting in the back of lecture halls. I am not considering a revision procedure, but at several months postop I did need an enhancement in one eye that initially did not give a desired correction like the contralateral eye.
      Overall, it was worth getting done, though.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BruinBones View Post
        TL;DR. If you just get LASIK for routine myopia there is still a chance you might need reading glasses, bifocals, or conventional glasses in the future as you and your eyes age.

        My experience: underwent lasik at age 38 for myopia (I think I was -10 diopters OU). I was counseled by ophthalmologist that any of the above scenarios could occur in 15-20 years, and sure enough, now in my mid-50’s, I use glasses and progressive bifocals for night driving and sitting in the back of lecture halls. I am not considering a revision procedure, but at several months postop I did need an enhancement in one eye that initially did not give a desired correction like the contralateral eye.
        Overall, it was worth getting done, though.
        The bolded is my main question. At 33, I am strongly considering moreso because my eyes have grown weary of long term contact wear and I'm tired of having rx sunglasses or my kids messing up my glasses every day. I have zero issues with artificial tears if needed.

        I don't mind the idea of needing readers or glasses in my 50s - were the 15 or so years of not needing glasses or contacts worth it? That's what I want to know.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DamageInc View Post
          I don't mind the idea of needing readers or glasses in my 50s - were the 15 or so years of not needing glasses or contacts worth it? That's what I want to know.
          I had mine done 4 years ago when I was 31. I've never regretted it and it's awesome never having to deal with contacts/glasses, especially when I work odd hours and days. You should also go to a well-known surgeon and not get one of those GroupOn deals. Not everybody is a candidate for LASIK. I had to have a minor touchup after my initial surgery but everything has been great. I had some dry eyes and halos for several months but those cleared up and I'm back to my baseline. It also wasn't a case of where you sit up and can automatically see. I had some fogginess and blurriness that cleared up over the course of about 4-6 hours but was told that in advance. Finally, it briefly smells like a cow getting branded.

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          • #6
            I had mine done when I was about 26/7. One eye was ‘undercorrected’ so that when I was older, I was told I wouldn’t need reading glasses. I had close to 20/20 in one eye and about 20/40 in the under-corrected one. I say for about 10 years I didn’t need glasses distance or reading. Then in the past 15 years or so, I’ve gradually started need to to the point where, I am totally dependent on glasses for distance in the last few years. I am currently -1.25 in one eye and -1.75 in the other. I’ve tried contacts but not really good option for me. I can still read without needing glasses but staring at computer screen is getting harder. When I put my distance glasses on I have to take them off to read a screen or books. I am currently trying progressive and dedicated ‘computer’ glasses. I also bought some regular reading glasses.

            It is becoming a mess. I have a pair of distance glasses, progressive, bifocal, ‘intermediate’ and just plain reading glasses.

            Just trying to figure out if i get lasik at this point, will I still have to end up needing reading glasses eventually. And also, not very sure about the ‘intermediate’ range benefits of getting lasik.

            outside of lasik, is an intraocular len a good fix for any of this? I know people with cataract get them, but not sure if anyone with astigmatism or other optical issues have done them.

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            • #7
              I got it 6 years ago in my late 30s, mid 40s now. One eye is a tiny bit undercorrected which helps with reading. Had some glare at night initially, no longer. No issues with near or distant vision, I am very happy I had it done. I’m fine with wearing reading glasses in the future once needed, wearing contacts or glasses every day was a big hassle for me.

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              • #8
                Got mine in 1998. I think my eyesight was -4.0 and -4.5. Best $600 I've ever spent for both eyes. Residency insurance covered 2/3's of the cost. They discontinued coverage the next year due to benefit abuse. I remember sleeping for about 2 hours after the procedure, then drove 40 miles home with those weird orange glasses. Initially 20/15. 2 year ago between 20/20-20/15. Since bike commuting it's now 20/15-20/13.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by STATscans View Post
                  outside of lasik, is an intraocular len a good fix for any of this? I know people with cataract get them, but not sure if anyone with astigmatism or other optical issues have done them.
                  Not for me. I had one eye done for close vision and was surprised how specific the focal distance is. I am trying to hold out on the other eye until the accommodating IOL technology improves.

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                  • #10
                    Horrible vision here; -4.5 I think. No intention of getting it. My eyes are my livelihood...even if the success rate is 99.9%.
                    And the number of people who end up needing some sort of correction later in life is greater than the number of people that don't so not worth a few years of glasses/contact free vision.
                    I take it as just the price to pay for having paul newman eyes.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Shant View Post

                      Not for me. I had one eye done for close vision and was surprised how specific the focal distance is. I am trying to hold out on the other eye until the accommodating IOL technology improves.
                      I'm in the same boat. I'm hopefully at least 10-15 years from reading glasses but I hope the technology improves so I can get robot eyes at that point.

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                      • #12
                        People have been waiting on better IOL technology for decades. It is very good now but there is absolutely nothing that can replicate the clear and flexible natural lens that you had when you were 20 years old.

                        Regarding LASIK, some patients choose monovision and that is a way to get good vision at a wide range of distances without depending on glasses. Otherwise, you will still need reading glasses. Unclear if OP is a candidate for a re-treat based on amount of current prescription. See a surgeon for a consultation. I would be grateful for the years that you have had excellent vision that you otherwise would have needed correction for. I think refractive surgeries promise a lot and don’t do a great job explaining what eventually happens or will be needed. Probably because it gets complicated.

                        In addition patients in their 50s are going to need cataract surgery in the near future, so the bang for your buck is not great if it only lasts a few years.

                        Finally, cataracts happen to everyone if you live long enough.. LASIK and PRK permanently reshape the cornea and it makes the final visual outcome of cataract surgery much less predictable as our usual formulas and machines are not as accurate. A history of refractive surgery makes it somewhat more likely glasses or contacts may be needed after surgery for best possible vision.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheDangerZone View Post
                          People have been waiting on better IOL technology for decades. It is very good now but there is absolutely nothing that can replicate the clear and flexible natural lens that you had when you were 20 years old.

                          Regarding LASIK, some patients choose monovision and that is a way to get good vision at a wide range of distances without depending on glasses. Otherwise, you will still need reading glasses. Unclear if OP is a candidate for a re-treat based on amount of current prescription. See a surgeon for a consultation. I would be grateful for the years that you have had excellent vision that you otherwise would have needed correction for. I think refractive surgeries promise a lot and don’t do a great job explaining what eventually happens or will be needed. Probably because it gets complicated.

                          In addition patients in their 50s are going to need cataract surgery in the near future, so the bang for your buck is not great if it only lasts a few years.

                          Finally, cataracts happen to everyone if you live long enough.. LASIK and PRK permanently reshape the cornea and it makes the final visual outcome of cataract surgery much less predictable as our usual formulas and machines are not as accurate. A history of refractive surgery makes it somewhat more likely glasses or contacts may be needed after surgery for best possible vision.
                          Very useful stuff. Thanks!

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                          • #14
                            I did PRK in my 30’s, surgeon felt it would be better for me than LASIK. Literally was life-changing for the positive as I had poor vision without glasses or contacts. Recovery time for PRK is rougher than for LASIK and had to take a week off work. Maybe slightly more dry eyes than before. No halos or other issues. About 6 years later going strong, wish I had done it sooner. If I need a touch up at some point, would do it as long as the surgeon I used (and trusted) felt the risks would be minimal.

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                            • #15
                              I basically have to use echolocation to see if I'm not wearing contacts or glasses ( rx -10). But until I meet a bunch of ophthalmologists who aren't all wearing glasses, I'm not doing lasik. Plus I kinda enjoy looking at a world of different colored blobs.

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