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  • nephron
    replied
    They need to give the robot the ability to restrain the patient if they are about to hurt themselves. They will have to use one of those AI programs so that the robots will be able to determine when they have to apply force vs just issuing a verbal warning without any supervision. That would make a neat movie, making judgement day come about when health care robot sitters turn on the health care providers. I don't know if that many people would care if robots were taking over hospitals though.

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  • childay
    replied
    Originally posted by Lithium View Post
    Bumping to share this NYTimes article (which should break the paywall). Always nice to see these corrupt hospital systems systems taken to task for the staffing shortages:



    Most interesting thing I saw was the emergence of these robot Avasure sitters. Is anyone observing these at their hospitals yet?
    Good article, unfortunately not surpising.

    Interesting agreed. But also fairly idiotic. I can't see the "robot" camera speaker convincing the delirious hospital patient not to get out of bed and fall, pull their foley, etc etc.
    I can imagine a very limited use case scenario for such but only if they could very quickly get onsite staff into the room (unlikely)

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  • CordMcNally
    replied
    Hospital systems are understaffed and can’t find the money but they can find the money for additional projects that cost hundreds of millions of dollars. The ED feels like it’s on the verge of collapsing every day.

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  • Eye3md
    replied
    Wow, fascinating article. I was angry at the system before I read this but the article makes me even more furious. Between insurance companies, and large hospital chains, we are all getting squeezed more and more. Unfortunately, with their powerful lobbies, its not likely to change until the family member of a US Senator dies because of this................as the article mentions, RN to patient staffing ratio bills were not passed in either Michigan nor Illinois because of powerful lobbying efforts

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  • Lithium
    replied
    Bumping to share this NYTimes article (which should break the paywall). Always nice to see these corrupt hospital systems systems taken to task for the staffing shortages:



    Most interesting thing I saw was the emergence of these robot Avasure sitters. Is anyone observing these at their hospitals yet?

    Leave a comment:


  • redsand
    replied
    If there is an RN shortage, why don't employers put in noncompete clauses in the employment contracts as a deterrent to quitting for another job? I suppose a noncompete clause wouldn't deter RNs from taking travel RN positions. (I am honestly wondering because I've never seen it discussed; if a noncompete clause is used for physician contracts to help prevent physicians from leaving and working for a competitor locally, why isn't it used for other healthcare professionals' contracts?)

    A relatively recent article about a hospital system that sued another so that workers would remain to work shifts at the hospital system where they had served their notice: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/24/u...wisconsin.html.

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  • AR
    replied
    Originally posted by CK36 View Post

    I just left the OR and the CRNA has been here for >15 years. However, for the last 2 years he has shifted from staff to "locums." Same exact job, much better pay. Still lives at home.
    I've seen this before. The difference is that the locums don't get any benefits, which is actually a huge cost-savings. When you add the value of the benefits, the employed individual is actually "paid" more. But if you don't want or need the benefits, this is a good strategy.

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  • childay
    replied
    Originally posted by CK36 View Post

    I just left the OR and the CRNA has been here for >15 years. However, for the last 2 years he has shifted from staff to "locums." Same exact job, much better pay. Still lives at home.
    Did he go through a locums agency? Pretty crazy

    Leave a comment:


  • CK36
    replied
    Originally posted by StateOfMyHead View Post

    I recently worked with a ED RN who quit her job at a nearby hospital and took locums gig, same town for 2xs the pay as her previous employer. W2 with benefits option through the locums company. She was a good nurse. I hope when the music stops she isn't left without a chair or local job.
    I just left the OR and the CRNA has been here for >15 years. However, for the last 2 years he has shifted from staff to "locums." Same exact job, much better pay. Still lives at home.

    Leave a comment:


  • GlassPusher
    replied
    Originally posted by Hank View Post
    Couldn’t we just use AI to replace RNs? After all, their job is more algorithmic and requires substantially less training than a mid-level or a primary care physician.
    Well if pigeons can do my job the rest of you don't have much hope.

    Leave a comment:


  • CordMcNally
    replied
    Originally posted by AR View Post

    How hard is it to get a travel nurse job in one's home city? Given the shortage, it can't be that bad.
    I *think* there's some restrictions as far as having your home address a certain distance from the hospital. I don't know all the ins and outs on the requirements to be considered a traveler but there's always loopholes that people use to 'travel' in the city they live in.

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  • Nysoz
    replied
    CNAs can’t pass meds or assess patients. Sure you can teach them that stuff. It’s called nursing school.

    My wife was one of those nurses getting $19/hr as a brand new RN. It’s one of the reasons why we moved.

    As for the shortage better pay and mandated ratios would help retain nurses. There’s quite a few leaving bedside because of the unsafe ratios and the stress associated. Then cue the pandemic and all the unvaccinated patients and families being aggressive and demanding to the staff. Which exacerbates the above.

    Then CNAs, environmental, cafeteria staff left too so on top of the nursing duties, now the nurses have to do those jobs too (at least passing trays part).

    Leave a comment:


  • artemis
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim View Post
    Some "traveling nurses" actual have a lifestyle desire. Ski in the winter, sounds like the Rockies. Want some sun, lets do Phoenix. Next?
    I have a friend whose daughter is working as a travel nurse for just that reason. She's using the experience to figure out where in the US she'd like to settle long-term. (Reno NV is looking to be the likely winner.)

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  • Tim
    replied
    Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

    COVID isn’t really the issue any more for many places. At least for my area, COVID never truly overwhelmed the hospitals. The lack of staffed beds is what overwhelmed the hospitals. It’s been a while since I’ve admitted a COVID patient. Nurses now understand how poorly they’ve been supported (along with nearly every other healthcare worker) all along. Their time is spent doing unnecessary tasks and useless charting instead of actual patient care. The same can be said for physicians.
    Not the case for college graduating students two years ago. 2-4 years depending on the program. A newly minted NP would go for the money in the vast majority of cases. Some "traveling nurses" actual have a lifestyle desire. Ski in the winter, sounds like the Rockies. Want some sun, lets do Phoenix. Next?
    Covid was a problem before vaccines. The pipeline was interrupted is likely.

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  • StateOfMyHead
    replied
    Originally posted by AR View Post

    How hard is it to get a travel nurse job in one's home city? Given the shortage, it can't be that bad.
    I recently worked with a ED RN who quit her job at a nearby hospital and took locums gig, same town for 2xs the pay as her previous employer. W2 with benefits option through the locums company. She was a good nurse. I hope when the music stops she isn't left without a chair or local job.

    Leave a comment:

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