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  • CordMcNally
    replied
    Originally posted by AR View Post

    Sorry if I was unclear, but the question was meant to be why would an RN want to become an NP right now. If it is some sort of long-term goal that's fine. Just make the money now and do that later. Someone up thread talked about RNs being lost to NP or CRNA training. For most it wouldn't make sense now. Of course, I could imagine scenarios where it would make sense for someone to pass it up now, but those are probably the minority.
    Many NP programs are online and they continue working as an RN through ‘school’.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank
    replied
    Couldn’t we just use AI to replace RNs? After all, their job is more algorithmic and requires substantially less training than a mid-level or a primary care physician.

    Leave a comment:


  • AR
    replied
    Originally posted by bovie View Post

    Of course—in the short term, certainly.

    You asked why an RN would want to become an NP—that’s not a short-term thing.
    Sorry if I was unclear, but the question was meant to be why would an RN want to become an NP right now. If it is some sort of long-term goal that's fine. Just make the money now and do that later. Someone up thread talked about RNs being lost to NP or CRNA training. For most it wouldn't make sense now. Of course, I could imagine scenarios where it would make sense for someone to pass it up now, but those are probably the minority.

    Leave a comment:


  • bovie
    replied
    Originally posted by AR View Post

    Who cares. Just do it until it's no longer available. Then maybe think of NP school or whatever after it goes away.
    Of course—in the short term, certainly.

    You asked why an RN would want to become an NP—that’s not a short-term thing.

    And the answer, again, is because this is a new and likely relatively short-lived phenomenon in the context of a career.

    Moving from RN to NP is both a time and financial commitment for the long-term, which has an anticipated positive value.

    Chasing lucrative traveling contracts in an objectively unique market is for the short-term, and only works for as long as that market lasts and after that will have a relatively negative value compared to the alternative.

    Leave a comment:


  • AR
    replied
    Originally posted by bovie View Post
    Because this is a fairly new development in that particular labor market and is not sustainable.
    Who cares. Just do it until it's no longer available. Then maybe think of NP school or whatever after it goes away.

    Leave a comment:


  • bovie
    replied
    Originally posted by AR View Post

    8K a week?!?

    So with ample vacation, let's say 45wks/yr, so $360K/year. Wow!

    Why would any RN want to become and Nurse Practitioner if they could just do that?
    Because this is a fairly new development in that particular labor market and is not sustainable.

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  • AR
    replied
    Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post
    One of my best, long-term RNs came to me on shift last night and asked what I thought about her going to be a travel nurse for a couple of 13 week stints this year so she could finally pay off her $70K in student loans. She said they were offering $5-8K A WEEK. I told her that's more than a lot of docs make. So now we'll hire a traveler to cover her spot while she's gone. Hard to blame her though.
    8K a week?!?

    So with ample vacation, let's say 45wks/yr, so $360K/year. Wow!

    Why would any RN want to become and Nurse Practitioner if they could just do that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Turf Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by The White Coat Investor View Post
    One of my best, long-term RNs came to me on shift last night and asked what I thought about her going to be a travel nurse for a couple of 13 week stints this year so she could finally pay off her $70K in student loans. She said they were offering $5-8K A WEEK. I told her that's more than a lot of docs make. So now we'll hire a traveler to cover her spot while she's gone. Hard to blame her though.
    Maybe she'll be "traveling" back at your shop! That's a pretty sweet trick.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim
    replied
    Some docs do locums and some don't. Nurses now have much more opportunities.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaqen Haghar MD
    replied
    It’s interesting. I’ve known a few NPs now who have recently returned to nursing. Being that backseat driver turns out to be a lot easier than being the front seat driver.

    The reasons for them leaving NP jobs appears to be 60hr work weeks on salary, which translates to pretty dismal hourly pay when it’s broken down. Regular nursing is paying significantly higher. Also a never ending physician-like schedule with call weeks, after hours work and phone calls, follow ups, and rounding on Saturdays and Sundays…. Leading to a very poor quality of life and 6-7 day work weeks.

    Everybody is short basic workers of all kinds.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarTrekDoc
    replied
    Younger ones willing to travel are leaving. Older ones ready to retire leaving. Mid-career tired of the drag transitioning to outpatient work -- all resulting in a significant donut hole for hospital work.

    For now, outpatient RN is relatively stable, but our ability to fill LVN and MA is longer than usual for quality candidates. We have about 20% openings right now 60+days that's stabilized.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    One of my best, long-term RNs came to me on shift last night and asked what I thought about her going to be a travel nurse for a couple of 13 week stints this year so she could finally pay off her $70K in student loans. She said they were offering $5-8K A WEEK. I told her that's more than a lot of docs make. So now we'll hire a traveler to cover her spot while she's gone. Hard to blame her though.

    Leave a comment:


  • afan
    replied
    That is called "capitalism".

    If you raise their pay for holding hospital jobs, then they will come back from the agencies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Random1
    replied
    I also see many of the new nurses, not wanting to take full time jobs locally, they are bouncing around doing travel nursing, and going to where ever is going to pay them the most. Others quit the local hospital system (we have two) , sign up for agency and just go to whom ever pays the best.

    Leave a comment:


  • Otolith
    replied
    1. Secondary to covid the job description changed for the worse. This was not offset by pay increase
    2. This created short staffing which made #1 worse and snowballed
    3. Homelife: many spouses of nurses or retirement accounts of nurses received increased pay secondary to the covid market allowing people to just simply quit/retire
    4. Homelife: headache associated with keeping kids out of day care or school with exposures and in person changing to remote constantly made work/life stress not worth it
    5. All while RN is viewed by many as no longer a career but a stepping stone to NP, CNA, ect...


    Solution reduce covid induced headaches at work/home and increase pay.

    i.e Make it more beneficial to work as nurse than not. It's not just a pay issue

    Leave a comment:

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