Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Are Physician wages falling off a cliff

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Specialists still seem unaffected from most data, but that could be a manufactured ploy ok reimbursement cuts. I chose rads when rads was “tanking” with no jobs. I am now a fellow. Today, rads are in big demand again. Practices in popular cities still fill right away. But previously stingy somewhat popular practices are having to re-evaluate their recruitment strategy, even some in great locations. Starting salaries seem increased in some places. Partner and/or bonus income seem pretty good (in the eyes of a fellow). The change is the productivity requirements and increasing rates of burnout, happening in every specialty. Major concern is physician owned corporations and private equity groups buying out practices (radiology, ER, anesthesiology, pathology, dental etc) and slashing physician salaries.

    Comment


    • #17
      The falling off the cliff  comment came from the WSJ. I guess I will not post anything I think is interesting again

      Comment


      • #18




        I think primary care is about to fall off a cliff (hospitialists included). NP’s and PA’s are going to be more numerous than actual docs in that field. Once hospital and corporate administrators realize they can hire a groupd of mostly mid levels for less than half the price of docs and just have one or two supervising docs around they will start getting rid of us very quickly. They have already done that with the creation of observation units in many places. Typically a team of 3-4 mid levels will admit and round on an entire floor of obs patients and one doc will be assigned to supervise their work. They just opened one at my old hospital.

        That is why I’m working my ****************** off right now picking up as many shifts as possible and picking up different part time positions, paying off debt and then saving like crazy. I predict that in 5-10 years my job will be mostly obsolete. I hope I’m wrong but I’m not optimistic. I hope to be financially independent and living on a farm by then

        Sub specialities are generally safe. Especially surgical fields. Doubt you’ll see any decrease in pay woth all the money they will save from primary care being gone.
        Click to expand...


        As a hospitalist I hope your wrong! At my place we cant get ACP's to work for our group after multiple attempts because they still need a supervising physician, that still needs to see their patients after them EVERYDAY!  The only place we are using them now are the low acuity ortho patients and Nursing Home. Another thing that is helping us is hospitalist do the shifts no one wants to do, especially Advanced care practitioners. We do nights, Christmas, etc. We have gone through multiple and they quit whenever we try to get them to stay later. They prefer 9-5 jobs, no nights no weekends if possible. We havent been able to keep an ACP longer than 2 years, they burn out faster than docs...go figure.

        Comment


        • #19
          I'll admit I was being a little too pessimistic with my post  I can't help it sometimes.

          Comment


          • #20


            They prefer 9-5 jobs, no nights no weekends if possible.
            Click to expand...


            Me too. Please let me know if you find one.
            Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

            Comment


            • #21
              Me three

              Comment


              • #22




                Me three
                Click to expand...


                Quattro!

                Comment


                • #23
                  This data contradicts other data I've seen regarding physician salaries.  MGMA, Medscape survey, etc.  On the average, we are increasing by less than a percent with real after-tax earnings.  The IHS projections regarding mid-levels should be concerning to a few groups for future earnings, namely primary care I'm sorry to say.

                  Comment


                  • #24




                    This data contradicts other data I’ve seen regarding physician salaries.  MGMA, Medscape survey, etc.  On the average, we are increasing by less than a percent with real after-tax earnings.  The IHS projections regarding mid-levels should be concerning to a few groups for future earnings, namely primary care I’m sorry to say.
                    Click to expand...


                    Primary care as in outpatient...yes ( again 9-5, no nights no holidays). For Hospitalists a bit different, demand driving salaries up. No one wants to do what we do...at the hours we do it. The hospitals now depend on us and consultants enjoy us admitting in the middle of the night and taking all the calls. In my current hospital we admit everything except surgical patients. The specialists love us!

                    Comment


                    • #25


                      The specialists love us!
                      Click to expand...


                      I'll corroborate that. Thank you dear hospitalist for all that you do.

                      In the late 90s I was badgered all night long. "The K is 3.0." "Mr. Jones had a 10-beat run of NS-VT." "Mrs. Jones was in sinus bradycardia down to 38 beats per minute. No, she is asymptomatic."

                      I was in at 2 a.m. at least twice per week for chest pain or SOB or some such thing. Now I get none of that, thanks to the finest physicians on earth, our hospitalists.
                      Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

                      Comment


                      • #26





                        The specialists love us! 
                        Click to expand…


                        I’ll corroborate that. Thank you dear hospitalist for all that you do.

                        In the late 90s I was badgered all night long. “The K is 3.0.” “Mr. Jones had a 10-beat run of NS-VT.” “Mrs. Jones was in sinus bradycardia down to 38 beats per minute. No, she is asymptomatic.”

                        I was in at 2 a.m. at least twice per week for chest pain or SOB or some such thing. Now I get none of that, thanks to the finest physicians on earth, our hospitalists.
                        Click to expand...


                        As I am at work right now and just admitted my one hundreth patient, and answered my one thousandth phone call (exaggeration of course) I say to all the specialist...Your welcome. I used to complain but I don't now. It is truly job security. There is no going back to "before Hospitalist" at this point.  

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          While I'm a big fan of hospitalists I don't think they are immune to the effects of the deluge we are about to experience from mid-levels over the coming decades.  The best thing primary care (including hospitalists and EM) can do IMO is prove that their degree is value add (research) and get in bed with or become the administration.

                          Comment


                          • #28




                            While I’m a big fan of hospitalists I don’t think they are immune to the effects of the deluge we are about to experience from mid-levels over the coming decades.  The best thing primary care (including hospitalists and EM) can do IMO is prove that their degree is value add (research) and get in bed with or become the administration.
                            Click to expand...


                            If you are employed by the hospital then the extra profit from mid-level work will be lost, but if you own the group and can be on the cutting edge of this trend then I think we can grow with the times.

                            Comment


                            • #29




                              While I’m a big fan of hospitalists I don’t think they are immune to the effects of the deluge we are about to experience from mid-levels over the coming decades.  The best thing primary care (including hospitalists and EM) can do IMO is prove that their degree is value add (research) and get in bed with or become the administration.
                              Click to expand...


                              It sounds like you are basically saying in the coming decades there will be no need for FP, IM and EM docs because ACP's will be caring for all the patients in all these fields. Lets make a small wager of your ENT practice for my...☺️

                              Comment


                              • #30







                                While I’m a big fan of hospitalists I don’t think they are immune to the effects of the deluge we are about to experience from mid-levels over the coming decades.  The best thing primary care (including hospitalists and EM) can do IMO is prove that their degree is value add (research) and get in bed with or become the administration.
                                Click to expand…


                                It sounds like you are basically saying in the coming decades there will be no need for FP, IM and EM docs because ACP’s will be caring for all the patients in all these fields. Lets make a small wager of your ENT practice for my…☺️
                                Click to expand...


                                Not sure where you got the idea that I insinuated that there will be no need.  Just a reduced need.  And this will be reflected in lower salaries.  Your competitive advantage can't be "no one wants to do what we do at the hours we do it".  Profit seeking mid-levels will be happy to put that to the test.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X