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True or False? Age Discrimination is Alive and Well in the USA

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Tim View Post

    Ahhh. But would 50’s raise thoughts or concerns? Past the prime concerns not because of maturity, productivity or competence, just too old? Beneath the surface?
    I started a new PP job at 54. I read a stat that 1/3 of all practicing radiologists are over age 55.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by AR View Post
      I definitely work harder now than I did as a resident and I have actual responsibility.
      Likewise. I did a cardiology fellowship 5 years after IM residency. It was demanding, but not nearly as demanding as my solo cardiology practice following fellowship.
      Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by AR View Post

        Is this typical? The only reason I wouldn't do residency again is the income. Otherwise it was a fairly enjoyable experience. Maybe things are worse now?

        I definitely work harder now than I did as a resident and I have actual responsibility. Residency would be like a vacation (especially if I know what I know now).
        Probably depends on the specialty and the program. Obgyn residencies are tough. Maybe derm isn’t too bad.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by AR View Post

          Is this typical? The only reason I wouldn't do residency again is the income. Otherwise it was a fairly enjoyable experience. Maybe things are worse now?

          I definitely work harder now than I did as a resident and I have actual responsibility. Residency would be like a vacation (especially if I know what I know now).
          Family medicine residency for me was about 60 to 80 hours a week depending on the rotation. Also we generally had some level of responsibility three out of the four weekends a month. Either rounding or call somewhere in the weekend. But we really did strive to give at least one full weekend off a month.

          Now I work 50 hours a week. I only take call on the weekends once every quarter. And that is only by phone. And when I'm at work I frequently have time to play chess and mess around on the white coat investor forum. Not to mention getting paid four to five times as much as I did as a resident. I definitely would not be going back!

          I did enjoy the work as a resident and really enjoyed the camaraderie with the other co-residents. What the god of working that hard again now with my family in full swing gives me palpitations.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Lordosis View Post
            And when I'm at work I frequently have time to play chess and mess around on the white coat investor forum.
            How does that happen? Don't you have a full schedule of clinic patients?
            Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by CM View Post

              How does that happen? Don't you have a full schedule of clinic patients?
              I'm interested in that as well. When I'm at work, I have very little time to do anything else. Almost none. Even going to the bathroom is significant decision. I have to actually put some thought into when the best time to go would be. Saving a couple of minutes is huge.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by CM View Post

                Likewise. I did a cardiology fellowship 5 years after IM residency. It was demanding, but not nearly as demanding as my solo cardiology practice following fellowship.
                I think the hardest part of training is that you don't really know what you're doing. If you give an experienced doc resident work it should be basically stress-free. There might be more scut work that you wouldn't do post-residency. So if there is a lot of that, I guess I can understand the distaste.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by AR View Post

                  I'm interested in that as well. When I'm at work, I have very little time to do anything else. Almost none. Even going to the bathroom is significant decision. I have to actually put some thought into when the best time to go would be. Saving a couple of minutes is huge.
                  I show up between 30 and 60 minutes before my day starts to clean out all my boxes. And I see patients and do the documentation as I go along. When I'm scheduled every 15 minutes generally I do not have a break and I roll from patient to patient. However I am unemployed physician and have to deal with inefficient office scheduling and nursing so if somebody needs a vaccine or basically anything more than routine it slows down everybody else way more than it slows down may. So sometimes I end up sitting around. I have previously tried to get rid of these inefficiencies in the office but all I seem to be doing is pissing off people because nobody wants to work any harder than they currently are. So I've decided that being moderately busy and having breaks here and there is probably better than being very busy making a little bit more money but having everybody pissed off and hate you.

                  We use medent emr. And by no means is it perfect but it is quite efficient for documenting and I spend very little time on documentation unless it's something exotic.

                  For some reason we're closed for an hour from noon to 1:00. I've tried to eliminate this but was told that hourly staff needs a break for some rules or guidelines. I tried to reduce it to a half hour and it was almost a coup. So I left that alone. And I'll just continue to play chess and go on walks at lunch time.

                  I hate sitting around doing nothing but I'm trying to make lemonade out of my lemons.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by VagabondMD View Post

                    I started a new PP job at 54. I read a stat that 1/3 of all practicing radiologists are over age 55.
                    Yes, but I'm not sure this is a good thing, particularly for the ones that are working over retirement age. Some of them are not up to date with new technologies, studies, research, etc. Some don't even read MR!

                    At a certain point, you need to call it quits.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by AR View Post

                      Is this typical? The only reason I wouldn't do residency again is the income. Otherwise it was a fairly enjoyable experience. Maybe things are worse now?

                      I definitely work harder now than I did as a resident and I have actual responsibility. Residency would be like a vacation (especially if I know what I know now).
                      I finished my residency 22 years ago, but with limiting work hours I’m sure it’s much different now, so I guess I’m referring to repeating my actual residency. Hate may be a strong word, but I hated it. Too many hours, no control of your life, bad pay, and I really didn’t like where I did my residency, which probably made a big difference. I’m pretty close to FI, if not there already, so no amount of money would be worth it to me.

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                      • #41
                        https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/26/gen-...eneration.html

                        Some numbers suggest 45 years. The question for everyone is the impact on employment caused by the shutdowns during the pandemic.
                        Probably not a factor for physicians. My gut feels like 45-60 are going to have a hard time and this will cause a deterioration of an already poor retirement outlook. Much will be due to networking connections that were cut short. Rather than kids moving back to the parents, the narrative will be parents moving in with the kids in 5 to 15 years, those lazy 45-60 year olds!
                        Delayed impact of the pandemic.

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