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Forget all this weight loss, anyone lifting weights?

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  • #76
    Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

    I guess I’m confused what point (or I guess counterpoint since you replied to me) you’re making. I replied to a poster who just can’t believe how anyone could ever enjoy a fitness activity besides lifting. If I somewhere said that you should never lift then feel free to show me which post.
    Well, he didn't actually say that. Here are the relevant bits:

    Sure, I play sports that I enjoy or hike to relax
    Unless it is an activity I actually enjoy (bball, mtb, etc)
    So it's clear that even he enjoys other "fitness activities". His point is that while he might enjoy them, he doesn't really do them to meet his fitness goals. He lifts to meet those goals and suggests that in order for most people (pretty much everybody) to meet their goals, lifting is what they should do. Now you can certainly disagree with that, but the basis for the disagreement is not "being unable enjoy another fitness activity".

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    • #77
      Originally posted by ShredtheGnar View Post
      DrSam, I would highly recommend a weight training coach in your case. Not safe lifting with an injury without some guidance from someone who is trained IMO.
      I'd second this. You might also need to see someone professionally about your back injury.

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      • #78
        Originally posted by AR View Post

        Well, he didn't actually say that. Here are the relevant bits:





        So it's clear that even he enjoys other "fitness activities". His point is that while he might enjoy them, he doesn't really do them to meet his fitness goals. He lifts to meet those goals and suggests that in order for most people (pretty much everybody) to meet their goals, lifting is what they should do. Now you can certainly disagree with that, but the basis for the disagreement is not "being unable enjoy another fitness activity".
        “I never understood how male docs can do anything except lift weights”

        I somewhat disagree about lifting to meet fitness goals. ‘Fitness goals’ run the gamut and I can think of lots of fitness goals where lifting would not be the foundation. ************************, even if you’re looking for some aesthetics there are lots of body weight exercise programs out there that would be very beneficial to the average person.

        The average person should do whatever fitness activity they enjoy…even prancersizing.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
          The average person should do whatever fitness activity they enjoy
          100% this

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          • #80
            Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

            “I never understood how male docs can do anything except lift weights”

            I somewhat disagree about lifting to meet fitness goals. ‘Fitness goals’ run the gamut and I can think of lots of fitness goals where lifting would not be the foundation. ************************, even if you’re looking for some aesthetics there are lots of body weight exercise programs out there that would be very beneficial to the average person.

            The average person should do whatever fitness activity they enjoy…even prancersizing.
            As I said there is certainly plenty to reasonably disagree with in that post. But he was pretty clear that you can enjoy other things. He even listed other fitness activities that he enjoys himself.

            I interpreted the quoted part as him saying that he doesn't understand why anyone would do anything except lift weights to meet their fitness goals. Obviously people have different fitness goals, but most are a combination of looking better and being healthier. Is lifting weights and doing nothing else the best thing for that? Certainly that's debatable, but again, that has nothing to do with enjoying other "fitness activities".

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            • #81
              Originally posted by ShredtheGnar View Post
              DrSam, I would highly recommend a weight training coach in your case. Not safe lifting with an injury without some guidance from someone who is trained IMO.
              I have a strong DIY ethic deeply ingrained in my consciousness/subconciousness, but I've contemplated this.

              The most I've done regarding learning proper lifting form/technique is watching online videos....mostly stuff from Mark Rippetoe of Starting Strength...I haven't obtained his book (yet?). I'm in a super rural area with no nearby SS certified gyms/coaches that I know of. Are there other reputable lifting coach type certifications that you'd recommend I look for. What I'm getting at is that if I were to get some coaching, I'd like to make sure I'm not just getting some moron (like myself ha ha) who is calling himself/herself an expert without anything legit to back that up. I've heard too many horror stories over the years of folks getting really $hitty and dangerous coaching.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by AR View Post

                I'd second this. You might also need to see someone professionally about your back injury.
                I've thought about this...perhaps finding a P.T. or physiatrist. Right now, the back isn't too bad...sometimes a bit sore in various places (seems to bounce around to different muscles upper/lower/left/right), but never any neuro deficits, etc. When I'm not being too lazy, I seem to get some good results from a combination of stretching (especially stretching the hip flexors, which makes me think the origin of my pains may largely be related to sitting too darned much) and some isometric stuff (planks, etc.)

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                • #83
                  I always HATED lifting, like despised it. I would start and usually do it once or twice. My husband had really been pushing me to add weights, as I was mostly doing cardio only (love running, cycling).

                  Last year when the pandemic started, I started to do light weights with high reps. When I first started, it sucked and I felt SO weak. Then I transitioned to heavier weights. I've been pretty consistent over the last year (try to do 3 days per week, one day of legs, one chest/back, one arms/shoulders). I now actually look forward to my lifts, feel stronger, am more toned, and feel great. I can't give up my cardio, but I've definitely cut back.

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                  • #84
                    I also do a mixed cardio/lifting program. I lifted heavy throughout high school and college for football and rugby, but found Olympic work to take a toll on my neck/back (I have what is like a bulging C6 or C7 disc which flares up pretty easily) so I gave that up.

                    Right now my workouts mostly consist of running 4-5 miles with 2 kids in a double stroller or biking, and lifting 2 days a week with a full upper body routine. My goal is to stay reasonably Swol and strong while not worrying about how I eat. I have the powerblock Pro-90s, which are amazing for getting a workout done with minimal downtime so you get some cardio in as well by alternating muscle sets (e.g. alternating sets of bench press and rows). I also think that unless you are training for max weight, dumbbell workouts are more physiologic and better for functional strength, as it requires more use of stabilizing muscles like real life does.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by DrSam View Post

                      I've thought about this...perhaps finding a P.T. or physiatrist. Right now, the back isn't too bad...sometimes a bit sore in various places (seems to bounce around to different muscles upper/lower/left/right), but never any neuro deficits, etc. When I'm not being too lazy, I seem to get some good results from a combination of stretching (especially stretching the hip flexors, which makes me think the origin of my pains may largely be related to sitting too darned much) and some isometric stuff (planks, etc.)
                      Ortho, so unfortunately I know exactly every little MSK thing that is F’ed up with me. I herniated a disc redoing the floors in our house just over two months ago. No radiculopathy, but it was classic (have done it 2-3 times before), piked at the waist in forward flexion, little tiny pop, and the realization it would be way worse by the next day (it was).

                      Over a year ago I had some biceps tendonitis, went to a physical therapist, and found that pretty much every exercise was from Crossover Symmetry (COS). So, I did t go back to PT, bought the COS shoulder set online (google) and fixed my shoulder myself (with some other stuff also, but mostly their programming). Still do a basic 6-7 min shoulder routine (it’s with bands) most days, start of workout or before surfing. It’s great.

                      They have a Hip/Core band also, so when I hurt my back I just ordered that. You could buy everything cheaper than from them, but the programming has value and we can all afford it here. They have a 30 day “fix your back” program, which is great. Focuses on hip abductors, posterior chain, core. It’s really great. My back is now mostly fixed, but I still do a short warmup with this set (5-6 min) daily as well. The key with back injuries, if you think a disc is involved, is to not be an idiot. Give it even longer than you think you need to. Just starting to squat and deadlift again after two years off, couple surgeries and now the back thing. I’m adding 5 pounds per week, right from the beginning. It’s super lame, but I want to give my connective tissue time to adapt which takes way longer than for muscle to come back. Slow and steady, respectable again in a year.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by coastal View Post

                        Ortho, so unfortunately I know exactly every little MSK thing that is F’ed up with me. I herniated a disc redoing the floors in our house just over two months ago. No radiculopathy, but it was classic (have done it 2-3 times before), piked at the waist in forward flexion, little tiny pop, and the realization it would be way worse by the next day (it was).

                        Over a year ago I had some biceps tendonitis, went to a physical therapist, and found that pretty much every exercise was from Crossover Symmetry (COS). So, I did t go back to PT, bought the COS shoulder set online (google) and fixed my shoulder myself (with some other stuff also, but mostly their programming). Still do a basic 6-7 min shoulder routine (it’s with bands) most days, start of workout or before surfing. It’s great.

                        They have a Hip/Core band also, so when I hurt my back I just ordered that. You could buy everything cheaper than from them, but the programming has value and we can all afford it here. They have a 30 day “fix your back” program, which is great. Focuses on hip abductors, posterior chain, core. It’s really great. My back is now mostly fixed, but I still do a short warmup with this set (5-6 min) daily as well. The key with back injuries, if you think a disc is involved, is to not be an idiot. Give it even longer than you think you need to. Just starting to squat and deadlift again after two years off, couple surgeries and now the back thing. I’m adding 5 pounds per week, right from the beginning. It’s super lame, but I want to give my connective tissue time to adapt which takes way longer than for muscle to come back. Slow and steady, respectable again in a year.
                        Never heard of Crossover Symmetry before. Thanks for the tip.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by NumberWhizMD View Post
                          I always HATED lifting, like despised it. I would start and usually do it once or twice. My husband had really been pushing me to add weights, as I was mostly doing cardio only (love running, cycling).

                          Last year when the pandemic started, I started to do light weights with high reps. When I first started, it sucked and I felt SO weak. Then I transitioned to heavier weights. I've been pretty consistent over the last year (try to do 3 days per week, one day of legs, one chest/back, one arms/shoulders). I now actually look forward to my lifts, feel stronger, am more toned, and feel great. I can't give up my cardio, but I've definitely cut back.
                          Yep many girls initially have the same mindset that you used to, in terms of lifting and its uselessness in helping to reaching their goals, when in fact, building a foundation of muscle only serves to improve your physique, while burning fat at the same time. It's good to see you've realized the advantages of lifting.

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