Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are the details of your "ideal life"?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What are the details of your "ideal life"?

    There is a lot of discussion on a variety of financial blogs about designing your "ideal life" and how money is merely a tool to give you time and flexibility. Although I am early in my career, I really like this concept and am working on slowly molding my existing life to my ideal life.

    As such, I was wondering what everyone's ideal life is during different phases of their life...
    1) Pre financial independence (still working)
    2) Post financial independence (working optional)


    Definitely interested in the nitty-gritty here so more details the better. Some categories of interest...
    -Work: cutting down (50% time), giving up call, not working night shifts, taking off Fridays/weekends, not seeing as many patients per day, etc...
    -Travel: # of trips per year or quarter, domestic vs international, trips with kids vs solo vs significant other, duration of trips (long weekends vs week long), purchasing a second home, etc...
    -Hobbies
    -Exercise
    -Financial: Side gigs, winding down real estate investments, etc...
    -Family: coaching kids sports, watching grandchildren, etc...
    -Significant others: date nights, trips, etc...
    -Splurges: anything major you have no guilt spending money on (may be overlap with some of the topics above)


    Thanks.


  • #2
    My ideal life is a life in which:
    1. I truly understand what I want,
    2. what I need to do to have that life,
    3. and (most importantly) am actively taking steps to achieve that. I believe for the first time ever, I’m in that position.
    It’s amazing how we all get caught up in the grind of allowing our lives to control us rather than the other way around. We continue following our everyday script without taking a step back to ask if this is how we want to use the limited remaining time - and we all have only a set number of days to get through our lives. I’ve been a much better planner and CPA for our clients and making sure they go through the above steps than I have for myself, but isn’t that the way it usually goes? Losing my husband was a big wake-up call.
    Last edited by jfoxcpacfp; 06-07-2021, 05:35 PM. Reason: Edited obvious errors!
    Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jfoxcpacfp View Post
      My ideal life is a life in which:
      1. I truly understand what I want,
      2. what I need to do to have that life,
      3. and (most importantly) am actively taking steps to achieve that. I believe for the first time ever, I’m in that position.
      It’s amazing how we all get caught up in the grind of allowing our livest to control us rather than the other way around. We continue following our everyday script without taking a step back to ask if this is how we want to use the limited remaining time we have left - and we all have only a set number of days to get through our lives. I’ve been a much better planner and CPA for our clients and making sure they go through the above steps than I have for myself, but isn’t that the way it usually goes? Losing my husband was a big wake-up call.
      I agree that as financially minded all of us are on here, sometimes we miss the big picture. I pinch a lot of pennies and have a lot of plans but sometimes life likes to change the best laid out plans.

      Last week my wife was in a car accident (she’s fine just had a small hematoma on her arm from the airbag I think). With that happening, it makes me realize how fragile life can really be with all the things out of your control. So yes it’s important to plan for the future and retirement, but also experience life while we have it and are able to.

      Anyways, my ideal life is doing what I want when I want which is vague purposefully. That includes doing nothing sitting on my porch sipping on a sweet tea with my dog rolling around in the grass or traveling to a new place trying out the Michelin star restaurant.

      Comment


      • #4
        Probably in a nuclear bunker somewhere with Crixus .

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JK View Post
          As such, I was wondering what everyone's ideal life is during different phases of their life...
          1) Pre financial independence (still working)
          2) Post financial independence (working optional)


          Definitely interested in the nitty-gritty here so more details the better. Some categories of interest...
          -Work: cutting down (50% time), giving up call, not working night shifts, taking off Fridays/weekends, not seeing as many patients per day, etc...
          -Travel: # of trips per year or quarter, domestic vs international, trips with kids vs solo vs significant other, duration of trips (long weekends vs week long), purchasing a second home, etc...
          -Hobbies
          -Exercise
          -Financial: Side gigs, winding down real estate investments, etc...
          -Family: coaching kids sports, watching grandchildren, etc...
          -Significant others: date nights, trips, etc...
          -Splurges: anything major you have no guilt spending money on (may be overlap with some of the topics above)
          The different phases of my life have been defined more by age than financial standing.

          I was broke while having the best times of my life. While walking across campus senior year, I noticed a poster nailed to a telephone pole advertising open university dance ensemble auditions. I knew nothing about dancing, but I was limber, male, and had some natural ability so they accepted me. I took every dance elective I could after that, danced with the university ensemble for a year, then auditioned for a regional jazz company.

          I loved it so much that I asked my med school to hold my seat for a year and they agreed, so I spent a year dancing before med school. It was the best decision I ever made.

          When I went to med school I was out in the clubs 5-6 nights per week, and I met the dancers, models, actors, and singers in town. Many of them moved to LA, and I made several trips out there to visit and go clubbing. Most of the best experiences of my life over the next 10 years occurred because of that year I spent between med school and college.

          After 4 years as an attending, I took a year to travel and to learn to surf, ski, and dive, among other things.

          I turned 35 toward the end of that year and then started a fellowship. I didn't realize it at the time, but life changed. I wasn't able to dance so well anymore. I wasn't able to get stronger in the gym. I didn't enjoy clubbing anymore. I lost touch with my friends in the arts.

          Life is good at 62, but youth was better.

          Regarding nitty gritty, I have given up call and weekends, and I recently reduced the number of patients I see per day. All of that definitely helps, but I'm still working now because I no longer have a passion pulling me away. My career got in the way of my life when I was young. Now, it's the biggest part of my life.
          Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

          Comment


          • #6
            No matter what, youth is definitely better.

            I think for me:

            work: 3 to 4 days a week. 9a to 3p job. This gives time to work out in the morning, see kid to school and come home to be at home. Right now it is 730 start and 5 pm close. Add commute before and after and it is depressing sometimes. Not so bad during the summer when light is longer but it gets
            Be able to take off work when ever I need to (not just when I’m lazy).

            Life:
            1) When not working go do other things besides maintenance of the house, doing dishes, doing laundry, plan for next house maintenance etc.. Seems like this takes a lot of time.
            2) Have the time to go and work out at least 3 times a week, whatever that is (bike, walk/hike, run, lift, play a sport). This goes back to the work thing and time.
            3) Have someone plan my meals so I don’t spend time shopping, looking up recipes, cleaning, washing etc..
            4) join some community building thing once a week (for example scout leader) or volunteer.
            5) host dinner parties once a month at least.
            6) visit and spend time with friends more frequently
            7) be part of a band/play instrument
            8) Not get cancer or other bad diseases that I can’t do the things above

            Last edited by STATscans; 06-06-2021, 03:06 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Currently in the wealth accumulation phase.

              I enjoy my work, but do wish there were not so many overnight deliveries. Not sure how to fix this cos it’s impossible to schedule deliveries. I can do this while I’m young, but will need to sunset this well before age 65yo.

              High on the priority list is to try not to raise entitled kids. Currently plugging into church and planning on being present in their education. Beyond that, not sure about details. Would love to hear what those who have gone before me have done!

              And part of my ideal life includes not being so friggin addicted to my phone. Ugggh. Not hooked in smoking or alcohol, but the phone addiction is real.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CM View Post

                The different phases of my life have been defined more by age than financial standing.

                I was broke while having the best times of my life. While walking across campus senior year, I noticed a poster nailed to a telephone pole advertising open university dance ensemble auditions. I knew nothing about dancing, but I was limber, male, and had some natural ability so they accepted me. I took every dance elective I could after that, danced with the university ensemble for a year, then auditioned for a regional jazz company.

                I loved it so much that I asked my med school to hold my seat for a year and they agreed, so I spent a year dancing before med school. It was the best decision I ever made.

                When I went to med school I was out in the clubs 5-6 nights per week, and I met the dancers, models, actors, and singers in town. Many of them moved to LA, and I made several trips out there to visit and go clubbing. Most of the best experiences of my life over the next 10 years occurred because of that year I spent between med school and college.

                After 4 years as an attending, I took a year to travel and to learn to surf, ski, and dive, among other things.

                I turned 35 toward the end of that year and then started a fellowship. I didn't realize it at the time, but life changed. I wasn't able to dance so well anymore. I wasn't able to get stronger in the gym. I didn't enjoy clubbing anymore. I lost touch with my friends in the arts.

                Life is good at 62, but youth was better.

                Regarding nitty gritty, I have given up call and weekends, and I recently reduced the number of patients I see per day. All of that definitely helps, but I'm still working now because I no longer have a passion pulling me away. My career got in the way of my life when I was young. Now, it's the biggest part of my life.
                You have led an interesting life.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I still like working. But I have full control of my schedule. That makes work so much more enjoyable.

                  I love the outdoors so I arise to go biking in the woods early every morning with a bunch of my friends, many of them docs; we call it morning rounds. I also go sailing and skiing frequently, depending on the season. Well, sometimes even not depending on the season. I have been to the Andes in South America to ski in the middle of our summer. Lots of fun!

                  I like working with full focus when I work, and I love the playtime too. We have a bunch of international trips on the docket. We enjoy cooking and gardening. I had a long bike ride today, went to the farmers market with my better half, and will be having a nice nap this afternoon. I think it is hard to say what an ideal life is, but I like my work in that I am contributing to others, which nourishes my soul, and then I have enough time to balance that meaningful, enjoyable work with plenty of time to play. I am so fortunate to be enjoying good health, a wonderful spouse and family, amazing colleagues to work with, overall a great life. I regularly take time to focus on being grateful for all that I have.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    - Hate medicine and everything it has become though I can tolerate it as long as my nights/call aren’t horrific. Most days are just 8-5 like any other working schmuck.

                    - 8-12 weeks off minimum

                    - outside of that as long as I get to enjoy the time when my kids are still at home (mostly kids sports for us with some skiing/golf) than I’m good

                    - no hobbies, goals, career aspirations at this point but it’s still all good.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by STATscans View Post
                      No matter what, youth is definitely better.

                      I think for me:

                      work: 3 to 4 days a week. 9a to 3p job. This gives time to work out in the morning, see kid to school and come home to be at home. Right now it is 730 start and 5 pm close. Add commute before and after and it is depressing sometimes. Not so bad during the summer when light is longer but it gets
                      Be able to take off work when ever I need to (no when I’m lazy).

                      Life:
                      1) When not working go do other things besides maintenance of the house, doing dishes, doing laundry, plan for next house maintenance etc.. Seems like this takes a lot of time.
                      2) Have the time to go and work out at least 3 times a week, whatever that is (bike, walk/home, run, lift, play a sport). This goes back to the work thing and time.
                      3) Have someone plan my meals so I don’t spend time shopping, looking up recipes, cleaning, washing etc..
                      4) join some community building thing once a week (for example scout leader) or volunteer.
                      5) host dinner parties once a month at least.
                      6) visit and spend time with friends more frequently
                      7) be part of a band/play instrument
                      8) Not get cancer or other bad diseases that I can’t do the things above

                      Pretty much the same for me. I really cannot complain much. There are a lot of annoyances with the job but 7-5 4.5 days a week and call is not to onerous. Going in later would not improve my life much because I am up with the kids anyway. Coming home earlier would be nice. It is a mad rush to feed the kids and then it is basically bedtime. I realize that will change as they grow and stay up later.

                      We have very little time to ourselves but work is not the problem. I figure it is best to work hard and save more now and have more to spend in a few years when kids are more self sufficient.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by White.Beard.Doc View Post
                        I still like working. But I have full control of my schedule. That makes work so much more enjoyable.

                        I love the outdoors so I arise to go biking in the woods early every morning with a bunch of my friends, many of them docs; we call it morning rounds. I also go sailing and skiing frequently, depending on the season. Well, sometimes even not depending on the season. I have been to the Andes in South America to ski in the middle of our summer. Lots of fun!

                        I like working with full focus when I work, and I love the playtime too. We have a bunch of international trips on the docket. We enjoy cooking and gardening. I had a long bike ride today, went to the farmers market with my better half, and will be having a nice nap this afternoon. I think it is hard to say what an ideal life is, but I like my work in that I am contributing to others, which nourishes my soul, and then I have enough time to balance that meaningful, enjoyable work with plenty of time to play. I am so fortunate to be enjoying good health, a wonderful spouse and family, amazing colleagues to work with, overall a great life. I regularly take time to focus on being grateful for all that I have.
                        Your life always sounds so pleasant and like you are appreciative which is even more important. I am most certain you deserve all you have. How many hours a week or month would you say you average at work?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm still in the wealth accumulation phase. Currently working 4 days/40 hrs per week. Will never take call ever again. Even before that while taking a tremendous amount of call for my former group my wife and I prioritized travel/experiences over other things. It helps to be with someone like minded.

                          During med school/residency I thought I would be the kill myself working until 45/50 then retire FIRE type, but life threw us a curveball and along the way I learned to appreciate time>> money. So we're on the path to coast FIRE instead. And probably enjoying it more, minus the reason for the change.Ideally I could keep this work schedule and then cut back to 1 week on/ 2-3 weeks off per diem-ing in a few more years while traveling more until I fully retire.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CM View Post

                            The different phases of my life have been defined more by age than financial standing.

                            I was broke while having the best times of my life. While walking across campus senior year, I noticed a poster nailed to a telephone pole advertising open university dance ensemble auditions. I knew nothing about dancing, but I was limber, male, and had some natural ability so they accepted me. I took every dance elective I could after that, danced with the university ensemble for a year, then auditioned for a regional jazz company.

                            I loved it so much that I asked my med school to hold my seat for a year and they agreed, so I spent a year dancing before med school. It was the best decision I ever made.

                            When I went to med school I was out in the clubs 5-6 nights per week, and I met the dancers, models, actors, and singers in town. Many of them moved to LA, and I made several trips out there to visit and go clubbing. Most of the best experiences of my life over the next 10 years occurred because of that year I spent between med school and college.

                            After 4 years as an attending, I took a year to travel and to learn to surf, ski, and dive, among other things.

                            I turned 35 toward the end of that year and then started a fellowship. I didn't realize it at the time, but life changed. I wasn't able to dance so well anymore. I wasn't able to get stronger in the gym. I didn't enjoy clubbing anymore. I lost touch with my friends in the arts.

                            Life is good at 62, but youth was better.

                            Regarding nitty gritty, I have given up call and weekends, and I recently reduced the number of patients I see per day. All of that definitely helps, but I'm still working now because I no longer have a passion pulling me away. My career got in the way of my life when I was young. Now, it's the biggest part of my life.
                            I picture your life as the movie Flashdance...except male.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by StateOfMyHead View Post

                              Your life always sounds so pleasant and like you are appreciative which is even more important. I am most certain you deserve all you have. How many hours a week or month would you say you average at work?
                              I will work a widely variable 60 to 120 hours per month. But again, the key is the control that I have. I can take lots of time off to travel pretty much whenever I want. And when I am home, with no travel plans, I like to keep busy. The work is enjoyable and the compensation is high. Even though we don’t need the money, I seem to thrive on the feeling of being very productive and I also enjoy the feeling of giving back, even though I am getting paid. And with all of that extra income, I can splurge and take my spouse to the best hotels around the world without blinking an eye. Even though I could do that without working, somehow it feels better with the high income continuing to flow. My older brother is a financially independent retired surgical specialist, but he and his spouse feel the need to watch the spending in a way that we don’t.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X