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  • #16
    Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

    Talking about your gingival pockets could be a niche pickup line.
    Probably makes it into the top 10,000. “Hey, do you intermittent fast?” probably makes it into the top 50,000.

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    • #17
      If you have manual dexterity issues or poor brushing technique (yes, it's a skill), electric toothbrushes can be a very helpful addition to you morning and nighttime routine.

      For what its worth, I use a $1 toothbrush from Target and have never had a cavity. Don't forget that flossing, a minimally cariogenic diet, and adequate fluoride exposure are all necessary for good oral health too (i.e. its not all about brushing).

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      • #18
        My Oral-B needs to be recharged after 2-3 brushes. I looked into replacing the battery but it requires soldering and decided it was too much work.

        Wife has the Phillips but I'm used to the Oral-B. Going to buy the cheapest Oral-B handle available when it finally dies.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by zlandar View Post
          My Oral-B needs to be recharged after 2-3 brushes. I looked into replacing the battery but it requires soldering and decided it was too much work.

          Wife has the Phillips but I'm used to the Oral-B. Going to buy the cheapest Oral-B handle available when it finally dies.
          I have found that the Oral B batteries degrade faster than the Sonicare ones. I usually replace my Oral B handle about every 3 years or so (yes, I get them for free, so I understand it's not the same situation most people have). My wife has had the same Sonicare handle for about 7 years now with pretty much no issues and hardly any battery degradation. I still really like the Oral B brushes a lot, but that is something to keep in mind when deciding between the two.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Minnesconsin View Post
            If you have manual dexterity issues or poor brushing technique (yes, it's a skill), electric toothbrushes can be a very helpful addition to you morning and nighttime routine.

            For what its worth, I use a $1 toothbrush from Target and have never had a cavity. Don't forget that flossing, a minimally cariogenic diet, and adequate fluoride exposure are all necessary for good oral health too (i.e. its not all about brushing).
            This is all very true, and yes, genetics do play a likely role as well (as far as enamel makeup and what types of bacteria your mouth tends to harbor. A higher concentration of S. mutans will lead to higher incidences of decay - this is why some people can brush their teeth religiously and still have a cavity every visit, and others take terrible care of their teeth and hardly have any fillings). Unfortunately, the vast majority of people do absolutely terribly with the controllable factors you mentioned, despite our best efforts of patient education. This makes a good electric toothbrush a valuable weapon for most, and why I recommend them to most everyone. If you've have been having success with your routine, you're definitely one of the lucky ones! I'd keep doing what you're doing, honestly you sound like an ideal patient!

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            • #21
              Because of the conflicting recs from multiple dentists and hygienists over the years, I have decided to live large and get both. Oral B in the morning, Sonicare at the evening. I've got a manual at the office that I don't really use as much as I should.

              Also for waterpics, the best thing I found is the kind that hooks up to your shower so you can do it when you're in the shower. No mess. The warm water takes a few days to get used to, but now it's no big deal.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by burritos View Post
                My ginigival pockets were always 4mm plus for 17 years. Always brushed and flossed. The visit after I started intermittent fasting, the pockets went to sub 2mm and has remained the same ever since for 3 years. Sorry for beating a dead horse. Could be placebo.
                Did the content of your diet change, or was it just the timing?

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                • #23
                  My last two dentists recommended against electronic brushes, stating they are too harsh and contribute to recession.

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                  • #24
                    Mother-in-law is a dentist. She gives me Sonicare toothbrushes because she likes the results. That said, if you want a more expensive toothbrush just spend the money. There are a few things I have no problem spending money on. Toothbrushes and shoes are definitely on that list. Anything you are going to use on a daily basis that can adversely effect your health should not be a place where you cut corners. Get whatever works best for you.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by CFEonline View Post
                      My last two dentists recommended against electronic brushes, stating they are too harsh and contribute to recession.
                      Only if you're brushing too hard, in which case you'd have the issue with a manual also. Using them the right way will not result in any additional recession.

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                      • #26
                        ****UPDATE******

                        Thanks to all who replied, especially Vottomatic with his / her suggestions.

                        1. I got the Phillips Optimum clean rather than Damond clean since my wife was unlikely to use one of the multiple settings. Also, the diamond clean charging using a charging pad and a glass tumbler sounds exotic but reviews said it was a pain and that a regular charging stand would have better.

                        2. I will stick with Oral-B and once it does not even charge for a single round of brushing, I might get another two pack of the same at Costco while they run their periodic sales.

                        3. I got the WaterPik at Costco and after one use I am impressed. I never liked string flossing and sometimes trying to do the back teeth induced nausea. I had a subconscious hate for it and maybe I did not do it as regularly as I should have done because of it. The water jet from the WaterPik is more soothing and not nausea inducing. A bit messy water running from the mouth over the handle but then I lean forward above the sink and there is no mess on the counter. i also rinse the handle clean. So WaterPik from now onwards.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by AR View Post

                          Did the content of your diet change, or was it just the timing?
                          The first year my diet didn't change much. I did eliminate the green juices which I sipped on througout the day. Did that for years thinking that "green phytonutrients" was inherently beneficial even though I couldn't specify exact mechanisms. Can't do that while you're fasting. 2nd year I reduced(not eliminated mind you) processed carbs. 3rd year I've reduced processed seed oils(not eliminated mind you) and added organ meats. Every visit has had been unchanged.

                          If you're interested, Weston Price's finding are remarkable.
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weston_A._Price

                          Lived/researched in a time when western diet wasn't yet as ubiquitous as it is now. He could still quite clearly delineate oral health between eating a western diet and non western diet:

                          In 1939, he published Nutrition and Physical Degeneration,[7] detailing his global travels studying the diets and nutrition of various cultures. The book concludes that aspects of a modern Western diet (particularly flour, sugar, and modern processed vegetable fats) cause nutritional deficiencies that are a cause of many dental issues and health problems. The dental issues he observed include the proper development of the facial structure (to avoid overcrowding of the teeth) in addition to dental caries. This work received mixed reviews, and continues to be cited today by proponents of many different theories, including controversial dental and nutritional theories.
                          If you think about the fossil records, most animals don't get cavities, including hominids pre grain diets. If the western diet can pathologize oral homeostasis, I suspect it's hitting every organ system to varying degrees. But we know that 'grains' are healthy. It says it on the package. Ok I apologize for that snark.
                          Last edited by burritos; 04-20-2021, 10:46 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Funny timing. We just had a Crest/Oral-B rep in today with the “latest and greatest” $300 toothbrush. It was actually pretty nice. It was very quiet and felt like only the brush head was moving, compared to some where the handle feels like a Jack hammer.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RDB View Post
                              Funny timing. We just had a Crest/Oral-B rep in today with the “latest and greatest” $300 toothbrush. It was actually pretty nice. It was very quiet and felt like only the brush head was moving, compared to some where the handle feels like a Jack hammer.
                              But who will buy a $300 brush handle / brush when a two pack handle of the mid range costs only $60-70 at Costco. That makes the latest brush 10 times more expensive, per brush handle.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Kamban View Post

                                But who will buy a $300 brush handle / brush when a two pack handle of the mid range costs only $60-70 at Costco. That makes the latest brush 10 times more expensive, per brush handle.
                                Could not agree more, it’s crazy.

                                I would love to hear your update in a few weeks, especially in regards to the Water-Pik. I have been recommending them for a long time, has never used one. I realized how ridiculous that is, so I brought one home last week. I am a big fan!

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