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Any Med-Peds physicians here?

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  • Any Med-Peds physicians here?

    I'm a rising 4th year, (It's now less than a year until med school is completed!) who is applying Med-Peds in the Match.  I was just curious if anyone on the forum is Med-Peds trained, and if so--if you had any advice before I hit my 4th year audition rotations and interviews. It's sort of a niche specialty, so not a whole lot of advice is out there on the internet, so I'd welcome any advice you could give...Thanks!

  • #2
    My younger brother is finishing his 3rd year of med-peds.  Best as I can tell he chose it because he couldn't figure out what to do with himself.  

    I don't think he reads these forums so probably won't see this. From what I recall, he mostly had to be prepped to discuss why he wasn't just picking one and what he would do with the training.

    I worked along side a lot of med-peds people during my gen peds residency (we had a large med-peds program where I trained).  I generally thought they were way smarter than the rest of us in gen peds.  Or maybe just having more high acuity experience from the medicine side made them seem smarter...
    An alt-brown look at medicine, money, faith, & family
    www.RogueDadMD.com

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    • #3
      I have not run across a meds-peds in practice in over 20 years. I do remember hearing about it when I was a med student, eons ago. Is that an academic specialty? Is there a geographic predilection? What gives?

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      • #4
        I'm Peds. Yes Med-Peds is still a specialty. I too felt like the Med-Peds people were the smartest. Many at my program chose to go into subspecialties in either peds or medicine, so I feel like it's possible they wasted a year of income by doing the dual residency. But I'm not med-peds so really my opinion doesn't count! Good luck!

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        • #5
          Everyone I knew in training ended up choosing one or the other. Seemed like a slow play for the undecided. Didn't make sense to me then, nor does it make sense to me now.. I would be curious what the demand and real world set up is like.. but good luck with the match!

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          • #6
            There are some that do adult and peds primary care.

            I also know many who have done combined adult and peds cards fellowships. It's adult congenital cards -- they will take care of all the heart babies who become adults that the regular adult cardiologists are scared of (I say that based on my adult cards friends who say they are scared of those patients).
            An alt-brown look at medicine, money, faith, & family
            www.RogueDadMD.com

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            • #7
              If you want to seem smart during interviews   you can chat up an interest in fetal origins of adult disease. Cool research that is very med-peds.

              In my mind the most practical use of Med-Peds training is transitional medicine... chronic disease management stuff for CF, T1DM, congenital HIV whathaveyou. Not that it's particularly lucrative, but a definite need

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              • #8
                I considered med-peds and still believe they are among the smartest docs out there.  I chose a med-peds doc for my child because I have the highest respect for them.

                However, be aware that med-peds is very regional.  Out west they are uncommon and where they do exist it is often in an academic setting.  They may find a job rolled into family medicine but then there is a training difference with your partners.  I agree with those above that med-peds is great training for the transitions of chronic pediatric diseases into adult medicine.

                Because this is WCI, you should consider the pay issue.  Peds is among the lowest paid and if you chose academics like many med-peds do, that is even lower pay.  Furthermore, if you pick peds or adults, will you feel that you wasted a year of earning potential? I would argue it is not "wasted" if you feel like you are learning, but is it worth the $150,000 opportunity cost? Then again I chose IM, but now that I have learned the WCI way I may have chosen a different specialty for financial reasons if I could do it all again.

                If my plan was to do outpatient primary care for kids and adults and I did NOT want to do obstetrics I would chose med-peds training over family medicine training.

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                • #9
                  AKA Family Medicine?? I kid, I kid....Kinda...

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                  • #10
                     


                    not a whole lot of advice is out there on the internet, so I’d welcome any advice you could give
                    Click to expand...


                    I'm Med-Peds. Finished residency last June. Doing primary care Med-Peds. Huge Med-Peds presence where I am, which is why I picked it for residency and ended up staying. From my class of 10, five are doing primary care, one is doing adult congenital cards fellowship, one is doing peds EM, one is doing peds Heme/Onc, one is doing environmental health fellowship while moonlighting in both adults/kids, and one is doing combined ID fellowship.

                    Not sure I've met a Med-Peds person who was indecisive and chose based on that. I loved both adults and kids and wanted to do both without having to do Ob. I also wanted full training in Peds--I think Fam Med has only a few months dedicated to Peds. This is especially pertinent as I have done some and plan to do more int'l work and kids under 5 suffer a disproportionate burden of disease (I know there's a lot of Ob globally too...)

                    While I love Med-Peds, it is true that at the time I made the decision I was not considering the loss of income from the additional year of training. However, right now I could not imagine doing a categorical residency.

                    My RVU rate is entirely tied to IM (so even for the peds pts I see), which is higher than Peds.

                    Shoot me a PM and I can share some more specifics with you.

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                    • #11




                       


                      not a whole lot of advice is out there on the internet, so I’d welcome any advice you could give 
                      Click to expand…


                      I’m Med-Peds. Finished residency last June. Doing primary care Med-Peds. Huge Med-Peds presence where I am, which is why I picked it for residency and ended up staying. From my class of 10, five are doing primary care, one is doing adult congenital cards fellowship, one is doing peds EM, one is doing peds Heme/Onc, one is doing environmental health fellowship while moonlighting in both adults/kids, and one is doing combined ID fellowship.

                      Not sure I’ve met a Med-Peds person who was indecisive and chose based on that. I loved both adults and kids and wanted to do both without having to do Ob. I also wanted full training in Peds–I think Fam Med has only a few months dedicated to Peds. This is especially pertinent as I have done some and plan to do more int’l work and kids under 5 suffer a disproportionate burden of disease (I know there’s a lot of Ob globally too…)

                      While I love Med-Peds, it is true that at the time I made the decision I was not considering the loss of income from the additional year of training. However, right now I could not imagine doing a categorical residency.

                      My RVU rate is entirely tied to IM (so even for the peds pts I see), which is higher than Peds.

                      Shoot me a PM and I can share some more specifics with you.
                      Click to expand...


                      Very helpful, thank you. I'll shoot you a PM

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                      • #12
                        I'm Med-Peds as well. A Med-Peds hospitalist actually, also graduated in June 2016 and I still do 50% Med and 50% Peds. I was definitely not wishy-washy and I definitely don't regret my training. Honestly, being Med-Peds has truly made me a better pediatrician and a better internist. I think family med docs are great but I think there's definitely a difference in training-at the end you will be a board certified in both specialties.

                        Like the previous poster, I didn't think about finances either when I started residency. Do i make a little less than a straight internist? Sure but i'm not struggling. And I can't imagine not seeing both populations.

                        The med-peds community is awesome and you're right, the Med-Peds presence varies regionally but honestly you can get a job anywhere as a Med-peds doc, you are very marketable. My past graduating classes have gone to Cali, Texas, went into primary care, fellowship, etc.

                        Have you checked out medpeds.org, the NMPRA site? Lots of info there!! A lot of the regional and national conferences LOVE students and residents, try to attend, we would love to meet you! Promise you, we're super friendly.

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                        • #13




                          I’m Med-Peds as well. A Med-Peds hospitalist actually, also graduated in June 2016 and I still do 50% Med and 50% Peds. I was definitely not wishy-washy and I definitely don’t regret my training. Honestly, being Med-Peds has truly made me a better pediatrician and a better internist. I think family med docs are great but I think there’s definitely a difference in training-at the end you will be a board certified in both specialties.

                          Like the previous poster, I didn’t think about finances either when I started residency. Do i make a little less than a straight internist? Sure but i’m not struggling. And I can’t imagine not seeing both populations.

                          The med-peds community is awesome and you’re right, the Med-Peds presence varies regionally but honestly you can get a job anywhere as a Med-peds doc, you are very marketable. My past graduating classes have gone to Cali, Texas, went into primary care, fellowship, etc.

                          Have you checked out medpeds.org, the NMPRA site? Lots of info there!! A lot of the regional and national conferences LOVE students and residents, try to attend, we would love to meet you! Promise you, we’re super friendly.
                          Click to expand...


                          Wow, a 50/50 Med-Peds Hospitalist is my dream job actually.  Are you in an academic setting or community hospital? It's encouraging to know that people are actually doing that with their training.  I was considering trying to make it to the National conference in September in Chicago....I wasn't sure if it was going to be good for students or not, but I'm glad to hear that we're welcomed there.  Now I will definitely try to make it there!

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                          • #14
                            Allergy is another specialty that benefits from med peds training. Most allergists see both adults and kids in practice even if they are IM or peds trained, so med peds is a real plus.

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