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  • WallStreetPhysician
    replied
    I'm a child of immigrants who came to the U.S. in the 1960s-1970s. I hope to instill the immigrant mentality of hard work and appreciation of their native culture in my children and grandchildren, as my parents did to me.

    -WSP

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  • Dreamgiver
    replied
    I immigrated from Italy when I was 18 to go to college here. Never looked back, best decision I have made in my life. I was lucky to get a full ride scholarship for undergrad in exchange for my artistic talent which the college badly needed at the time. It was a long and winding road to med school. My parents were low level clerks in Italy and I am always amazed at how  much they were able to give me and keep nothing for themselves. I gross in 2 weeks more than they made in one year combined. I am proud to call myself an American now. My colleagues at work all make fun of me because I am the dude going around with guns sticking out of my shirt driving a lifted truck (instead of singing opera while driving a Vespa...). I love this country and the fact that the American Dream still exists. Contrary to where I moved from, hard work is truly rewarded. Now that my parents are retired I have moved them here to be with us and enjoy what they never had access to before. Truly a dream come true for me.

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  • Wudoc111
    replied
    Father came to US from Taiwan in 1970 and we joined him in 1972. I was about 4 years old. He started out as a lab tech/phlebotomist since he could not practice his prior occupation which was dentistry. We all squeezed into a studio apartment in downtown Los Angeles. But he jumped into real estate and did very well. Despite amassing a large empire, he still lives very humbly.

    My father-in-law also immigrated as well and retired as a computer analyst. He and his relatives invested in individual stocks and despite our concerns, they somehow did very well. But he also lives a very humble life.

    Regarding guilt, it is more often when we take them out to fancy restaurants that they feel guilty and order the cheapest items. The "all you can eat" buffets are their favorites (agh those sticky floors!). We get a nice smile if we pull out a coupon or Groupon. Overall, since they grew up in periods of scarcity, they are most satisfied in quantity over quality and obtaining the best bargain.

    As for myself, I have experienced living in poverty when we first came to the US to the other extreme of unlimited spending as a spoiled teenager.  But ultimately accumulating luxury items just means more clutter and things to ultimately throw away. When you have children of your own, there becomes new responsibilities and one of which is to set a good example. Thus, we try to not to spoil them which often equates to our limiting our purchases. With the children's extracurriculars there really is very little time to spend on luxuries anyway.

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  • EDDOCMOM
    replied
    As a third year resident I was "staffing" a Neurology Intern on an ED rotation - who had 6-7 years experience as an attending anesthesiologist in Pakistan prior to coming over!  I had nothing to add to his evaluation or skill set!

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  • CM
    replied




    Moved to the US when I was 12 years old, lived as a refugee in 2 different countries and was born in a war torn central Asian country. Dad was an MD and mom was a professor before the war. Once we moved to the US my dad became a dominos pizza driver and my mom cleaned hotels, my 2 older siblings (17 and 15 y/o) started working at restaurants to pitch in financially. After a lot of hard work and frugal living, my dad took a 6month software course and became a software programmer. The option of going back to residency to practice medicine was out of the question considering he had 2 school aged kids and 1 about to graduate high school.

    My parents put our education and futures ahead of everything else. To this day I can see how much my dad misses medicine and my mom misses teaching. If someone ripped me from my country, threw me across the ocean to a country I didn’t know anything about, and stripped me of my professional license, I only hope I’d be able to stay afloat let alone exceed and raise 3 successful, independent children(I realize that’s a run-on sentence but I like it lol).

    Both my parents still work because they don’t want to burden us, but we three are financially preparing ourselves to help them once they want/need it. They now live for their grandkids, my siblings and I don’t matter anymore ?.

    Thanks to America’s immigrant beginnings, we now call ourselves Americans and feel equal here to every other US citizen!
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    .

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  • GXA
    replied
    Child of an immigrant couple who arrived in 1970.  Showed up at JFK with little if any money with them.  Their ride to pick them up never showed up.  Fortunately a nice couple my mother had befriended on the flight gave them a ride.

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  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    Not an immigrant. Not even close. 5 or 6 generations at least. Maybe more. In fact, many of my ancestors immigrated, then left the United States, then were forcefully repatriated when the US annexed their land after war with Mexico. So I guess in that respect, my very white family is mostly composed of Mexican immigrants. But it's been 150 years.

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  • ddscook
    replied
    Moved to the US when I was 12 years old, lived as a refugee in 2 different countries and was born in a war torn central Asian country. Dad was an MD and mom was a professor before the war. Once we moved to the US my dad became a dominos pizza driver and my mom cleaned hotels, my 2 older siblings (17 and 15 y/o) started working at restaurants to pitch in financially. After a lot of hard work and frugal living, my dad took a 6month software course and became a software programmer. The option of going back to residency to practice medicine was out of the question considering he had 2 school aged kids and 1 about to graduate high school.

    My parents put our education and futures ahead of everything else. To this day I can see how much my dad misses medicine and my mom misses teaching. If someone ripped me from my country, threw me across the ocean to a country I didn't know anything about, and stripped me of my professional license, I only hope I'd be able to stay afloat let alone exceed and raise 3 successful, independent children(I realize that's a run-on sentence but I like it lol).

    Both my parents still work because they don't want to burden us, but we three are financially preparing ourselves to help them once they want/need it. They now live for their grandkids, my siblings and I don't matter anymore ?.

    Thanks to America's immigrant beginnings, we now call ourselves Americans and feel equal here to every other US citizen!

    Leave a comment:


  • DMFA
    replied




    Moved here when I was barely 2. Parents were both ivy league educated in their home country and it’s somewhat sad that she couldn’t use her skills here and became a us postal worker. But she’s retired with a pension, cheap health insurance and a sizeable 401k, so it’s all good. But it’d be like me, an MD, moving to a foreign country and having to work at starbucks.
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    A friend's mom immigrated from Taiwan and was a cardiologist there.  She didn't want to do residency again and instead started a supplements franchise.  Probably is doing about as well as she would have done doing cards here.

    I kinda get the purpose of having stringent qualification standards for foreign-educated professionals, and I've never worked at a place where prior subspecialists were internal medicine interns, but it definitely seems absurd to me.  When one of my buddies was at the university hospital across town as a 26 year-old PGY2, his intern was a board-certified intensivist in Argentina with more experience than some of the ICU attendings.  People must really, really want to be in America as opposed to from whence they came.  Another one of my buddies has a German wife who was an ophthalmologist there and said "************************ no" to re-doing residency here.  He's stationed in Germany now, so they can both work while Oma and Opa watch die kinder...winning!  Wonder if they'll even come back.

    I guess that's one of those things I can't understand, being from here...I guess it's like teenage angst, but for nationality.

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  • Dr.V. Investor
    replied
    I am an immigrant.  There was a post by WCI, fresh off the boat.  I can relate to that.  It was a struggle to get in but once I entered residency, I can only count my blessings.  I came with my lifesavings (my inheritance from whole life insurance) $2000.  goal was not to spend all of that until I start getting paid.  I have bed to buy and rent to pay. My allowance during med school was $10-12 per week.  It makes me smile thinking about this.

    Both parents are physicians back home.  No retirement fund but invested in real estate.  My father persevered to send 3 children to med school and 1 went to college and second career, which he supported as well.

    major advantage: we graduated debt free.  We really know how to be poor- meaning no car, eat what you can afford. pay credit card full amount all the time.

    I hope to be able to pass on to my children the value of education without debt and value of grit.

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • RogueDadMD
    replied
    2nd-gen immigrant (parents came in the 70's) who has received substantial financial help from my parents.  I'm grateful to them and plan to pass it on to the extent I can, not just the financial support but the other lessons I've received.

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  • Miss Bonnie MD
    replied
    Moved here when I was barely 2. Parents were both ivy league educated in their home country and it's somewhat sad that she couldn't use her skills here and became a us postal worker. But she's retired with a pension, cheap health insurance and a sizeable 401k, so it's all good. But it'd be like me, an MD, moving to a foreign country and having to work at starbucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • YSH
    replied
    Immigrant.  Grew up eating vegetables grown from our tiny "backyard garden" (before this was considered cool) and with lots of potato dishes (cos baking potatoes are dirt cheap).  I still remember my sibling and I spending summers at the factory where my mom worked, doing little chores here and there, to earn pennies.  This was also because my family couldn't afford summer babysitters, camps or tutoring classes.

    After my partner and I brought our house and put in our 20% down payment, I told my mother that I was a bit concerned because we were left with only $1xxK left in our entire combined savings (not counting retirement) for emergencies, moving cost, life, etc. This was with both of us having jobs. My mom gave me the biggest snort laugh and said "child, when your father and I brought the house you grew up in (smallest fixer upper in barely reasonable neighborhood in HCOL area), your father and I barely had 10K left in total to our names".  This was with both my parents working labor heavy, no job security blue collar positions, raising 2 kids (age 7 & 10) and having no retirement savings.

    I shut up pretty quickly after that.  Perspectives!!

    On a happier note, my parents are now in their early/ late 60s, financially independent of their two children, and my mom still chooses to work.  They have no mortgage or any other debt and has rental income of their own.  All I can say is that their financial independence from their children is one of the greatest gifts they have given to us.

    I long to one day show my first generation children what the tenements look like.  But you know, by then, tiny living will be all the rage. lol

     

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  • jfoxcpacfp
    replied
    Thank you for starting this thread. It is a great pleasure to read and I hope many others will post their stories, always interesting. Many of our clients are 1st and 2nd generation Americans and it is a blessing to work with those from different cultures and learn their history.

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  • Craigy
    replied
    Yes!  Well, great-great grandchild of someone who was 1st generation French. 

     

     

     

     

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