Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Personal cell number

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by TheDangerZone View Post
    I actually strongly dislike texting with patients. It’s too easy to text about every little thing. If it’s important then truly call me any time but I don’t want to be texting patients during my off time for things that can wait until regular clinic hours.
    I agree with that but I set phone do not disturb at night to allow phone calls (important for residents to be able to get in touch with me overnight if needed) but not texts. Asking patients to text limits the possibility that I will be awakened at night and also allows me to respond when convenient for me. If a true emergency patients have the triage line and can go through the usual filtering process before getting to me.

    Re: the question earlier about how to limit to postop period: it's impossible. However, I've only had 2 patients in 2 years continue to text months later with questions about follow-up, test results etc. I humor those for awhile but will ultimately let them know that they need to call the nurse line going forward.

    Comment


    • #32
      I agree I prefer calls over texts. With texts, the patients can save them for litigious reasons. I hate texting in general. When I get a text, I call them back. People text too much. Especially women. It's like my wife who constantly has a cell phone in one hand and a credit card in the other.

      Comment


      • #33
        Other docs: yes (and I am more likely to refer my patients to specialists who provide them and answer a question I have)
        Patients: I am extremely selective but it seems that so far everyone has been very judicious on when to reach out to me

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by toofy View Post
          I agree I prefer calls over texts. With texts, the patients can save them for litigious reasons. I hate texting in general. When I get a text, I call them back. People text too much. Especially women. It's like my wife who constantly has a cell phone in one hand and a credit card in the other.
          Cool. Texting isn't for everyone I guess.

          I will respond to the one part of this post that is worth responding to and actionable: "With texts, the patients can save them for litigious reasons." Yes minor risk. However, I think fostering a good relationship with patient is the clearest way to avoid litigation and being available and helpful is the best way to foster a relationship. If there is any risk that there is an actual medical problem then I call the patient back to not have my advice in writing. Most of the time it's minor and expected postop symptoms, medication dosing questions, wound care etc. If postop swelling they send me a picture so there is no question of what's going on.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by TheDangerZone View Post
            I actually strongly dislike texting with patients. It’s too easy to text about every little thing. If it’s important then truly call me any time but I don’t want to be texting patients during my off time for things that can wait until regular clinic hours.
            I do not like calls coming while I am with patients, in the hospital, driving, with family or friends or in similar situations. With a text I can glance at it and reply right away or later on or even initiate a call.

            So far no patient has abused the phone texting.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by wideopenspaces View Post
              I'm surprised at how many give their number to patients. As a psychiatrist that's a no go. I once had a patient in a manic episode figure out who my mom was, her phone number and called her. She very helpfully gave out my cell number. The patient would not stop calling me. I finally had the clinic call them to say if they called my cell phone one more time they would be fired from the clinic. Thankfully that did the trick. I use *67 or doximity to call patients from home. I'll give my cell to other physicians and therapists.
              I would not expect a psychiatrist to give out their cell number to patients. On the other hand I work in a field where sometimes it appears to be more deaths than life. These patients usually do not abuse the privileges given to them and hence I have no problem handing out my number to them.

              Comment


              • #37
                Did family medicine for 25 years, most years on call every other night and every other weekend. What a pleasure to have a phone and not looking for change and a telephone booth or using a beeper. Our phone answering message gave the phone number for which of us was on call. Rarely was ever bothered by a patient with a problem that wasn't necessary. Patients really appreciated the ability to call. If a patient called a few times with unnecessary questions, I would usually let them know that the call wasn't appropriate and that usually solved the problem. Worked in a rural area, however.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Other physicians-they all get my #. A lot more referrals get sent directly to me instead of the group "first available new patient" pool. Never abused.

                  Patients-only if I have known them already and trust they won't abuse the privilege. Most of these are medical staff-RN's, respiratory therapists, social workers etc. People who I know well enough that even if they text me on a Sunday afternoon when I'm not on call that their asthma is flaring, I won't feel put out.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by nephron View Post
                    A patient told me today that her primary care physician asked that I call her sometime to discuss the patients medications. I had a very slow clinic day, so just for kicks I decided to give it a try. After waiting on hold and going through an extensive teleprompter, then providing the patients name, home address, date of birth to identify the patient (the person who picked up would not pass along the message unless I confirmed the identity of the patient), I left my cell phone and waited for a call back in the morning. After I did not receive a call back in the morning, I was bored and decided to repeat the process in the afternoon. I probably spent some 20 minutes on hold/going through teleprompters trying to get through to this provider who never did call me back. I don't know why providers put up so many barriers to other physicians trying to get a hold of them to discuss patient care issues. I chose the word providers on purpose in this instance.
                    As a pathologist, I often think about how many hours I spend a day trying to get through to a physician or non-physician practitioner with patient results. If only I could bill for this time! Critical values, new malignancies, clinical questions . . .. these all require communication. Why do so many physician offices make it so difficult? The worst is when there is a critical value on a weekend. Good luck trying to get hold of someone to tell about platelets below 10,000 or a new leukemia. I can't comprehend how so many physician offices don't even have an answering service.

                    <steps off soapbox>

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by wideopenspaces View Post
                      I'm surprised at how many give their number to patients. As a psychiatrist that's a no go. I once had a patient in a manic episode figure out who my mom was, her phone number and called her. She very helpfully gave out my cell number. The patient would not stop calling me. I finally had the clinic call them to say if they called my cell phone one more time they would be fired from the clinic. Thankfully that did the trick. I use *67 or doximity to call patients from home. I'll give my cell to other physicians and therapists.
                      #boundariesAF

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        On occasion I will give out my number to a patient , with unresolved issues that can't wait until the next day in the office or monday.

                        I will add their number to my address book temporarily , and I always keep call block on, which filters out any call that is not in my address book. So if someone thinks they have a Saturday night sinus infection , the call won't go through. My personal message states , you have reached Dr Office, if this is an emergency call 911 otherwise call the office number.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          okay but what about giving your number out to others outside of medicine (real estate agents if you go to an open house, car sales people, etc)?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by braindoc View Post
                            okay but what about giving your number out to others outside of medicine (real estate agents if you go to an open house, car sales people, etc)?
                            That’s where you give them your junk email hotmail or yahoo account and 867-5309 for the telephone number. Your own real estate agent can have your or your spouse’s phone number. Some car salesman or showing agent at an open house doesn’t need your phone number if you aren’t buying that car or house. (He probably doesn’t need your personal cell phone number even if you’re buying a car or house.)

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Hank View Post

                              That’s where you give them your junk email hotmail or yahoo account and 867-5309 for the telephone number. Your own real estate agent can have your or your spouse’s phone number. Some car salesman or showing agent at an open house doesn’t need your phone number if you aren’t buying that car or house. (He probably doesn’t need your personal cell phone number even if you’re buying a car or house.)
                              Isn’t this plain ole common sense?
                              Our passion is protecting clients and others from predatory and ignorant advisors. Fox & Co CPAs, Fox & Co Wealth Mgmt. 270-247-6087

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Hank View Post

                                That’s where you give them your junk email hotmail or yahoo account and 867-5309 for the telephone number. Your own real estate agent can have your or your spouse’s phone number. Some car salesman or showing agent at an open house doesn’t need your phone number if you aren’t buying that car or house. (He probably doesn’t need your personal cell phone number even if you’re buying a car or house.)
                                As a resident we still had old style pagers. Every once in a while you would get a page from Jenny at 867-5309.
                                always good for a laugh!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X