Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tesla

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • “All told, wind supplies 17.6% of electricity use in Texas, and the state is the nation’s leader in wind energy generation.
    Vast swaths of land in Texas, with little population nearby. Interesting dance for sure.
    The question is how many wind turbines can be deployed and how efficient they would be.
    I would be curious how ERCOT actually balances the supply side, basically scheduling shutdowns or less than capacity. Like any business, volume counts. Sorry, 17.6% with uncertain availability is a problem for the primary source unless you have other sources. I keep hearing solar, uhhh all those flat empty tracks of land don’t seem to be planted or growing. The only conclusion I have is economics don’t work.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Tim View Post
      Sorry, 17.6% with uncertain availability is a problem for the primary source unless you have other sources. I keep hearing solar, uhhh all those flat empty tracks of land don’t seem to be planted or growing. The only conclusion I have is economics don’t work.
      Tim , don't take it the wrong way but you know what your problem is - you are an eternal pessimist.

      I showed you a graph showing your state was the leader in the emerging energy and likely to increase and maintain lead, and instead to shouting hurrah you manage to find a negativity about it. You not only should brag about it and also state that soon, Texas with its year round sunshine, will overtake California in solar energy too and be an undisputed leader. At least, that is what I would have done if it was South Carolina. I accept its faults but I take pride in my state if it achieves positive things ( Boeing Dreamliner, BMW plant, Volvo etc) , and in my country too.

      Be optimistic, life is too short for pessimism.



      Comment


      • Biggest CO2 sinks(if you think it's an issues) are 1. Ocean. 2. Soil. 3. Forrests. I might be romanticizing this notion, but with wind, you can hopefully do it with preservation of opens space and protect soil(and trees?). Regarding ruminants, you can even create food with no CO2 impact with regenerative grazing(vs industrial animal farming, which is cruel, uses fossil fuel grown/dead-soil-moncropped farming).

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Kamban View Post

          Tim , don't take it the wrong way but you know what your problem is - you are an eternal pessimist.

          I showed you a graph showing your state was the leader in the emerging energy and likely to increase and maintain lead, and instead to shouting hurrah you manage to find a negativity about it. You not only should brag about it and also state that soon, Texas with its year round sunshine, will overtake California in solar energy too and be an undisputed leader. At least, that is what I would have done if it was South Carolina. I accept its faults but I take pride in my state if it achieves positive things ( Boeing Dreamliner, BMW plant, Volvo etc) , and in my country too.

          Be optimistic, life is too short for pessimism.


          I object to the single source “religion”. If we actually had “scientists” and a government working on solutions for power generation that would be a breath of fresh air. Actually, developing electric cars is not the critical path now. Too much is made of “states”. You do realize the large solar and wind farm logistically make sense to power the Rockies. What everyone finds attractive is “That means you don’t even necessarily have to invest any cash in order to reap the benefits of wind energy for your home or business.”
          The gulf makes more sense. Higher average sustained wind.

          If the goal is 20% by 2030, and the practical capacity is about 20%, then why the thought that a specific state is a leader?
          https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2...y-power-farms/
          The location is crucial and efficiency important. Green source energy is more expensive now, even with much government provided support.

          Good consistent wind is hard to find. Kind of like drilling for oil & gas.
          https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/...-harnessed.php
          Take one look at EIA’s website and you will see why the state boundaries favor 20% of wind farms. The question is whether it is economically feasible to do more?
          That is not pessimism, my thoughts are wind is the easiest solution because turbine technology is highly developed. Why has solar not taken off in the region? Realistically it would appear the technology has developed on micro applications, not major volume producers. The economies of scale aren’t there yet.
          Practical solutions is all I ask for delivering electricity.
          Texas and Oklahoma are in the sweet-spot for wind and oil. Seems the same for solar, but I don’t think you can blame it on pessimism. Just not ranking at the top of investments.
          I actually think it will be regional (actually subregions) sources developed and power grids evolve.

          Comment


          • https://www.mystateline.com/news/nat...advocates-say/

            The supply is the issue to be solved for Climate Change.
            By far electricity "hogs" are HVAC and EV's for individuals. The answer is don't use them until capacity is there.
            Would $350b investment in "renewable energy" do more good than loan forgiveness? You can have anything you want, but not everything. Reparations too?
            https://www.mystateline.com/news/nat...g-gas-car-ban/

            CA is asking everyone to park the EV's. Ironic how that works.

            That is not pessimistic, it is reality that each region needs specific efficient supply that will be determined by Mother Nature and efficient use of energy.
            That is not the political message nor the spending taking place. A lot of the "Climate Change" narrative is not addressing the supply issues. Wind turbines on houses or solar panels is not a practical solution. Helpful yes, but not a solution.

            "“Today, most people charge their electric cars when they come home in the evening — when electricity demand is typically at its peak,” according to Cornell University’s College of Engineering. “If left unmanaged, the power demanded from many electric vehicles charging simultaneously in the evening will amplify existing peak loads, potentially outstripping the grid’s current capacity to meet demand.”

            That means all EV's are being asked not to drive over the Labor Day weekend. Broad brush solutions for a natural problem. EV's are energy hogs as well as HVAC.
            Mother Nature will decide this , not "incentives". I see absolutely no discussion of the plan for specific areas. That is greatly needed.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by burritos View Post
              Biggest CO2 sinks(if you think it's an issues) are 1. Ocean. 2. Soil. 3. Forrests. I might be romanticizing this notion, but with wind, you can hopefully do it with preservation of opens space and protect soil(and trees?). Regarding ruminants, you can even create food with no CO2 impact with regenerative grazing(vs industrial animal farming, which is cruel, uses fossil fuel grown/dead-soil-moncropped farming).
              I believe grazing AND industrial farming are both harmful to the planet because the amount of land cleared and used. The worse thing about grass fed free range is that they take up a lot of land and produce less food. This is a potentially novel solution

              https://www.frontiersin.org/articles...019.00032/full

              Solar/wind will also potentially take up a lot of land. We've reached a point that we not only have to slow the output of CO2, but also vacuum some of it up by re-establishing forests and ecosystems taken out by agriculture.

              There is a balance between pro-human and pro-planet that needs to be struck if we want to survive as a species. Compromise on either front doesn't look to be around the corner.

              Comment


              • Sorry if this has been answered elsewhere, but I currently have a MYLR on order with tentative delivery estimate for December.

                With the new EV tax credit, theres nothing for me to gain with delaying delivery to after the new year, correct? High earning household (thus I suspect phased out even if otherwise eligible)

                Comment


                • Originally posted by 8arclay View Post
                  Sorry if this has been answered elsewhere, but I currently have a MYLR on order with tentative delivery estimate for December.

                  With the new EV tax credit, theres nothing for me to gain with delaying delivery to after the new year, correct? High earning household (thus I suspect phased out even if otherwise eligible)
                  No benefit from the tax credit since more than likely it'll have an income cap. No known/rumored running upgrades coming down the pipe either.

                  Comment


                  • Don't have kids/parents for ownership of the title by chance?

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Brains428 View Post

                      I believe grazing AND industrial farming are both harmful to the planet because the amount of land cleared and used. The worse thing about grass fed free range is that they take up a lot of land and produce less food. This is a potentially novel solution

                      https://www.frontiersin.org/articles...019.00032/full

                      Solar/wind will also potentially take up a lot of land. We've reached a point that we not only have to slow the output of CO2, but also vacuum some of it up by re-establishing forests and ecosystems taken out by agriculture.

                      There is a balance between pro-human and pro-planet that needs to be struck if we want to survive as a species. Compromise on either front doesn't look to be around the corner.
                      I think if you cut down forests to create grazing land, then that is obviously environmentally destructive. If you let ruminants just graze in one spot to the point that they eat everything on the pasture, then that too is destructive. If you can move them from plot to plot and mimic what ruminants as nature designed, that that is a self sustaining macroecosystem. Before the europeans settled america, there were an estimated 30 million buffalo roaming the grasslands of America.(there are currently 30+million cows in the USA).

                      https://www.theatlantic.com/national...illers/482349/

                      This was not an ecological conundrum nor was CO2 emissions an issue. Nature used this mechanism to build and sustained the soil. Regenerative grazing is boring sounding and takes a lot of work, but has been shown to turn deserts into fertile land.



                      I don't know if we can scale it to feed everyone but even more prescient, I don't think we have the will. The west does not want to live with nature, it just wants to dominate it for wealth and convenience. We just have to wait for the implosion before things get back on track, that's generally how history works.

                      Comment


                      • burritos
                        ”If you let ruminants just graze in one spot to the point that they eat everything on the pasture, then that too is destructive. If you can move them from plot to plot and mimic what ruminants as nature designed, that that is a self sustaining macroecosystem.”

                        I am not qualified to address the “ science” behind TED talk of “desertification” and using animal grazing to prevent it. But I do KNOW that farmers are way ahead of this.
                        1) Pastures: Horses, cattle, milk cows and sheep graze differently.
                        2) Crop rotation has been around for over a century. A field will “wear out”. This is addressed primarily by a combination of crop rotation, say corn or soybeans or grain to hay (less stressful but still productive) followed by grazing then back to cash crops. And yes Mother Nature is assisted by fertilizers, pesticides and disease resistant plants AND old fashioned farming elbow grease. Plowing and preparing the soil is farming.
                        3) The farmer depends on the cash crops for his well being. Four generations of “farmers” with AG degrees (one with a masters) that actually farm has produced changes.
                        4) The “intelligent” farmer knows which land has productive potential. The potential of a piece of land is determined by Mother Nature (basically the soil composition by area within a county, not the result of use or practices).
                        5) Rotations and grazing has been replaced by additives and cash crop yields have skyrocketed and are planted every year but requires the assistance of an “intelligent farmer”.
                        6) Mother Nature is still a big factor. Basically change in temperature or too much rain at the wrong periods aren’t addressed. Irrigation handles lack of water.

                        I certainly know you can’t scale it. You can’t truck in good farming soil by the acre.
                        My point is the TED talk might address climate change, but he is a long way from the micro world. He doesn’t know crap about raising horses, cows, cattle or sheep. THAT is a lot of work, unproductive too.
                        PS: Cow Pattie’s naturally occur twice a day. Tell him they get milked twice a day and most are regular. He needs to invest in a manure wagon and a tractor and manure spreader. That crap is nutrients that needs to be evenly spread as a natural fertilizer.
                        He made one mistake on 10k or 12k elephants.
                        I don’t trust his micro to macro logic. He has been wrong before. He may be very intelligent, but he needs to partner with some “intelligent farmers”.

                        Long winded anecdote. I do appreciate his micro view of the impact of “burning” on land management. Rocky and sandy soil is not suitable for farming or water retention for vegetation. Probably not much use for grazing either. Now, his solution doesn’t solve that problem either.

                        Circle back, Mother Nature is a big factor. The assumption is that someone can productively raise livestock and grow crops on the land. THAT is a huge assumption.

                        Comment


                        • Did the last update affect autolock on the chargeport? Have to click unlock either in the car or through the app key to unlock the charger, even at home. Didn't see anything obvious in the settings to stop cease this.

                          Comment


                          • At what point does Elon admit the Cybertruck just isn’t going to happen the way he thinks it will? He announced today that it would be waterproof and able to use as a boat for short periods. Sounds like more empty promises while they continue to push the production date back.

                            Comment


                            • New York follows California's lead in banning the sale of new ICE cars by 2035 - now that 2 of the largest economies in the US have gotten the ball rolling, EVs will continue their exponential growth in adoption no doubt.

                              https://gizmodo.com/new-york-ban-gas...ars-1849597617

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by xraygoggles View Post
                                New York follows California's lead in banning the sale of new ICE cars by 2035 - now that 2 of the largest economies in the US have gotten the ball rolling, EVs will continue their exponential growth in adoption no doubt.

                                https://gizmodo.com/new-york-ban-gas...ars-1849597617
                                It’s tough to legislate things like this. I think this is probably shortsighted for a state without the infrastructure for every vehicle to be electric. This may be another gentle shove for those already looking for an exit.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X