Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tesla

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Zaphod
    replied










    Where does Tesla recommend to only charge to 80%? I’m just curious, because I’ve never heard this. Lithium ion batteries are not very fussy and IME need no special coddling.
    Click to expand…


    I attached a screen shot from the Tesla app.  You can set the charge level with a slider – 50% to 90% is labeled “daily” and 100% is meant for trips.  I’ve never tried it, but I think if you charge to 100% frequently the car will warn you there is a risk of damaging the battery.

    Most electric cars don’t let you charge to the actual 100% state of charge in order to extend battery life.  For example, the Volt has a 17 kWh battery, but only allows use of 10.5 kWh or so.  I’m not sure about the i3 but it’s probably similar.

    For anyone interested, here’s some good info on the factors that affect Li-ion battery life: https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries.

     
    Click to expand…


    Interesting, thanks for sharing.  To me it would make more sense for the engineers to protect the batteries rather than leave it to the car owners.  Meaning, don’t actually let me charge my car to “true 100%”, but rather let the display read 100% while the charge is actually less than that.  And base your real world range off that expectation.
    Click to expand...


    They have done so I believe, and at times even forced an 80% max recently, which people were super mad about so I think they reversed it.

    Leave a comment:


  • hightower
    replied





    Where does Tesla recommend to only charge to 80%? I’m just curious, because I’ve never heard this. Lithium ion batteries are not very fussy and IME need no special coddling. 
    Click to expand…


    I attached a screen shot from the Tesla app.  You can set the charge level with a slider – 50% to 90% is labeled “daily” and 100% is meant for trips.  I’ve never tried it, but I think if you charge to 100% frequently the car will warn you there is a risk of damaging the battery.

    Most electric cars don’t let you charge to the actual 100% state of charge in order to extend battery life.  For example, the Volt has a 17 kWh battery, but only allows use of 10.5 kWh or so.  I’m not sure about the i3 but it’s probably similar.

    For anyone interested, here’s some good info on the factors that affect Li-ion battery life: https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries.

     
    Click to expand...


    Interesting, thanks for sharing.  To me it would make more sense for the engineers to protect the batteries rather than leave it to the car owners.  Meaning, don't actually let me charge my car to "true 100%", but rather let the display read 100% while the charge is actually less than that.  And base your real world range off that expectation.

    Leave a comment:


  • hightower
    replied




    How much does cold effect the battery?  It gets mighty cold here and it would suck to walk out to your car after being in the office for 10 hours and it cannot get you home.
    Click to expand...


    My car typically gets 130ish mile range in good 75 degree weather (depending on how I'm driving)

    In sub zero temps that number can drop to around 100-110 mile range

    Leave a comment:


  • StarTrekDoc
    replied




    No offense intended. My question was respectful. Sometimes a family runs a car for an extremely long time. Easily can be 12-16 hours before one gets back to the garage. That is not continuous driving but i can easily have situations without a break. Go and come back from work then take-off on a 200 mile trip. Think weekend soccer tournament.

    5 minutes would plug it in. One car was the question. Not a slam. Four and 8 hours is a long time to wait to take off.
    Click to expand...


    Didn't take offense nor meant to be snippy back.  Totally understand the need to run the car lots of hours.   Wife does 200+miles easily in a day quite often.   We put nearly 25,000 miles on local driving on the Tesla 3 in 9 months and 1 set of tires doing it in local driving.   That's before our Grand Canyon trip.   All on a Tesla 3 310mi battery.

    In most busy family cases a large battery capacity will be able to handle it on a single charge.  If by chance do you need a fast recharge cause you're getting down to 50mi and home overnight isn't for another 100mi -- a quick 15min recharge at a supercharger station will plow 100mi into the car when it's 20% state-of-charge.   Are those supercharger stations ideally located in your area?  I don't know.   In San Diego, we have quite a few options and well within our travel routes and routines -- but that's for us and matches up nicely.

    Are EVs are everyone right now?  Nope.   Can it fit most Americans driving habits for 90%+ of the time.  Yep.   There's still that gap that will necessitate an ICE engine so single car families will be late adopters to the party until infrastructure AND batteries get into place to handle folk to 100% --- I highly doubt anyone in this forum is a single car family nor wouldn't have a large vehicle transport system too for distance vacation travel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim
    replied


    you park your car for 8+ hours every single night.
    Click to expand...


    No offense intended. My question was respectful. Sometimes a family runs a car for an extremely long time. Easily can be 12-16 hours before one gets back to the garage. That is not continuous driving but i can easily have situations without a break. Go and come back from work then take-off on a 200 mile trip. Think weekend soccer tournament.

    5 minutes would plug it in. One car was the question. Not a slam. Four and 8 hours is a long time to wait to take off.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X