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  • HumbleInvestor
    replied
    Its definitely the soundproofing of the car and the Tesla rep acknowledged (not sure if he intended to) that this car does not do a good job of. I drove with the radio off mostly to test that part. We have a 2 yr old Pilot that I was comparing it to and I agree with Zaphod that on highways it's mostly the road and wind noise. I wish they did a better job on the interior and sound proofing.

    The drive itself was cool with toy car feel changing the lanes and accelerating on the ramp to hwy. Wasn't a fan of regenerative breaking and turned it off after few mins of driving. May be it's better on highways.

    I dont know if Tesla does this often or a sign of slowing sales, they offered I can take it home for 24 hours on weekdays so I get a better feel for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zaphod
    replied




    @zaphod – during any acceleration, engine noise is the primary factor. At cruising, road noise is the primary factor.  You’ll know if you’re on concrete vs new asphalt vs just a crappy road.  Wind noise doesn’t become an issue unless 70+ or you have the radio off completely.  Tires and their pressure make a huge difference.  Tesla has high efficiency tires on and they like to blow it up to 42 PSI.  Most forums agree that if you lower to 36-38 on the OEM tires, it makes a significant difference.  I did.   Even better, went to sports tires with the new pair –  lost 5% efficiency but even more fun and even quieter too now.

    @lordosis – yep. That’s the main drawback/advantage of EVs right now.  If you have a garage and regular daily usage range is 200miles, overnight charging gives you full 100% without issue.  Same concept as destination chargers.   For road trips along distance stops, we’ve never had to wait.  The hard to predict ones are when you’re in a metro area and locals are using it to recharge because they have free supercharging.   I, for the life of me, have no idea why most people dropping $70K+ on a car is willing to sit around to supercharge their car to save a few dollars — like those driving 10 miles additional and sitting in 30min line for Costco gas.

    I charge at home, non-issue.  Go on routine trips to LA and no supercharger needed unless several days there and no destination charger.  At those occasions, timed with local shopping mall shopping with family and recharged easily.  Only time used superchargers significantly are large roadtrips.  Didn’t wait at any of those pitstops with planned meals/breaks.
    Click to expand...


    Maybe true on the inside of the car, but probably more an insulation difference than anything else. On the outside, its a negligible difference starting at 30 km/h.

    https://www.toi.no/getfile.php/1340825/mmarkiv/Forside%202015/compett-foredrag/Lykke%20-Silent%20Urban%20Driving.pdf

    At slower speeds, like say urban ones EVs are significantly quieter overall.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarTrekDoc
    replied
    @Zaphod - during any acceleration, engine noise is the primary factor. At cruising, road noise is the primary factor.  You'll know if you're on concrete vs new asphalt vs just a crappy road.  Wind noise doesn't become an issue unless 70+ or you have the radio off completely.  Tires and their pressure make a huge difference.  Tesla has high efficiency tires on and they like to blow it up to 42 PSI.  Most forums agree that if you lower to 36-38 on the OEM tires, it makes a significant difference.  I did.   Even better, went to sports tires with the new pair -  lost 5% efficiency but even more fun and even quieter too now.

    @Lordosis - yep. That's the main drawback/advantage of EVs right now.  If you have a garage and regular daily usage range is 200miles, overnight charging gives you full 100% without issue.  Same concept as destination chargers.   For road trips along distance stops, we've never had to wait.  The hard to predict ones are when you're in a metro area and locals are using it to recharge because they have free supercharging.   I, for the life of me, have no idea why most people dropping $70K+ on a car is willing to sit around to supercharge their car to save a few dollars -- like those driving 10 miles additional and sitting in 30min line for Costco gas.

    I charge at home, non-issue.  Go on routine trips to LA and no supercharger needed unless several days there and no destination charger.  At those occasions, timed with local shopping mall shopping with family and recharged easily.  Only time used superchargers significantly are large roadtrips.  Didn't wait at any of those pitstops with planned meals/breaks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lordosis
    replied
    I am somewhat rural so I have a skewed view but I wonder about how available super chargers are.  I know of a few in my area about 30 min away at a shopping mall and the rest are destination chargers which I understand to be slower.  As EVs become more popular  obviously there will be more popping up.

    I honestly would not mind pulling over for 30 min every few hours on a road trip.  However if there is a line and it is a 2 hour wait then what?  Has this started happening yet or are they keeping up with demand?

    Do the rest stops on the larger interstates have chargers?

    Or just places that want to lure people off the highway.  (People willing to drop a lot of $$$ on a car)

    Leave a comment:


  • Zaphod
    replied







    I had an EV back in the early 90s. Jeep Wrangler Power wheels. I remember it had to charge for 18 hours and barely ran for an hour. Needed to replace the battery every couple few years.
    Got the new version for my kids 25 years later. Zero improvements other then a built-in radio. My son is disappointed that it does not run as long now that it is colder.
    Click to expand…


    Cheap lead batteries or worse Ni-Cad.

    @humbleinvestor – Yeah, the rear sits lower than usual sedan and entry is a bit awkward as well as finding how to open the door in the first place.   Surprised on the road noise aspect.  Usually the loudest part of a regular car experience is the engine.  There’s simply no EV engine noise.  You’ll have road noise no matter what.   FYI comfort setting is for steering wheel and chill mode is the amount of power acceleration –again very little noise from the engine regardless and regen on the braking.   Curious – what car do you both drive now?
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    In both ICE and EV unless some old muscle car the loudest part of driving is road noise and air resistance, which both EV and ICE are very similar with after 20ish mph. Sometimes there is a bit of engine sound, but eliminating it doesnt do much when there is just so much air/road noise at highway speed.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarTrekDoc
    replied




    I had an EV back in the early 90s. Jeep Wrangler Power wheels. I remember it had to charge for 18 hours and barely ran for an hour. Needed to replace the battery every couple few years.
    Got the new version for my kids 25 years later. Zero improvements other then a built-in radio. My son is disappointed that it does not run as long now that it is colder.
    Click to expand...


    Cheap lead batteries or worse Ni-Cad.

    @HumbleInvestor - Yeah, the rear sits lower than usual sedan and entry is a bit awkward as well as finding how to open the door in the first place.   Surprised on the road noise aspect.  Usually the loudest part of a regular car experience is the engine.  There's simply no EV engine noise.  You'll have road noise no matter what.   FYI comfort setting is for steering wheel and chill mode is the amount of power acceleration --again very little noise from the engine regardless and regen on the braking.   Curious - what car do you both drive now?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lordosis
    replied
    I had an EV back in the early 90s. Jeep Wrangler Power wheels. I remember it had to charge for 18 hours and barely ran for an hour. Needed to replace the battery every couple few years.
    Got the new version for my kids 25 years later. Zero improvements other then a built-in radio. My son is disappointed that it does not run as long now that it is colder.

    Leave a comment:


  • HumbleInvestor
    replied
    I test drove a Tesla 3 AWD today. The ride is fun but I am disappointed by the lack of rear space (I am not tall by any means and my head hit getting in and my legs could not get out easily) and the interior. I drove in the comfort setting hoping for a quiet drive but the overall noise was comparable to my ICE car. My wife was disappointed as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • White.Beard.Doc
    replied
    We don't have time of use rates where we live, but we do have a plan where they track when you charge your car and reward you for charging at night when usage is low.  We get between $50 and $100 per month in cash every month for charging our cars after midnight.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarTrekDoc
    replied
    @Kamban - yep - that's California!   Gas $4+ and Electricity routinely $.20kwh.  -- Sunshine tax

    @RosieQ   We've been NEM 1.0 forever.   Last year we moved over to the new SDGE rate plan TOU-5  that's very EV friendly even though we lost the peak 12n-6p solar times.  That's mitigated by our battery to allow for time shifting usage and we're such low users 4p-10p anyways, the battery carries us without issue.   The $0.09 12mn-6A  and through 2pm on weekends were killer benefits for us as we put 30,000mi on the Tesla last year alone (~1000kwh)   Those charge savings easily outweighed the solar generation that we benefiting from on the old NEM 1.0 schedule.

     

    Leave a comment:


  • CordMcNally
    replied




    Does anyone think EV charging would tempt companies to set pricing to take advantage of all those cars charging overnight?
    Pretty soon the battery disposal issue might become a revenue stream. What taxing entity would dare tax a revenue source?
    Tax credit, neutral, tax. Maturing industries are revenue sources. Don’t think we have any idea where this ends.
    Who is going to pay the roadway taxes when gas is outlawed? The economics will shake out later.
    Click to expand...


    Absolutely, companies (especially the government) are always looking for ways to help their bottom line.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kamban
    replied
    @RosieQ California power rates are always a mystery to me. When I see rates as high as 0.42/Kwh I just shake my head in wonder. I think most of the country pays $0.08-0.16/Kwh. Mine is 0.11/kWh including all taxes and surcharges with no peak / off peak variation.

    But if you have a off peak between 12 midnight and 3 PM why not set the charging between 1 and 6 AM and some of the daylight electricity credit can be used for charging. Or maybe I have no idea how your complicated buy back works.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim
    replied
    Does anyone think EV charging would tempt companies to set pricing to take advantage of all those cars charging overnight?
    Pretty soon the battery disposal issue might become a revenue stream. What taxing entity would dare tax a revenue source?
    Tax credit, neutral, tax. Maturing industries are revenue sources. Don’t think we have any idea where this ends.
    Who is going to pay the roadway taxes when gas is outlawed? The economics will shake out later.

    Leave a comment:


  • RosieQ
    replied
    Be sure to check your electric rate plan before a potential Tesla (or other EV) purchase. We have a unique situation where we are in a semi rural area and use of a lot of electric. We also have solar power and PG&E will buy back solar power with a credit for peak/off peak that corresponds to the time for peak/off peak on your rate plan. They just introduced a new rate plan for EV charging putting lower off peak pricing (good) at $0.16/kw which is affordable but a bit above the national average. However they extended the off peak time from 12am all the way out to 3pm (bad), so they credit your solar power generation back to you at off peak rates all the way until 3pm, so most of the daylight solar hours would then get off peak credits. Our current estimated anual electric bill with solar is around $645. Switching to the EV2-A charging plan WITHOUT actually charging increases price to $1255 for increase of $610 just by bad arbitrage between solar generation and buy back at peak vs off peak. Then add in the EV charging for 20,000 miles driving a year and price goes up to $2565 year. That's $1920 extra per year or around $160 per month...pretty much exactly what I would pay for gas. None of this crazy money savings that is advertised due to the solar power penalty. To come out ahead we would need to invest around $25k more in both extra panels and then add a battery storage to minimize peak power consumption in the late afternoon and evenings. Alternatively pay around $2k to install a second power meter and then pay $0.16 at night, but still several thousand in extra outlay negating a lot of the savings of EV charging compared to gas.

     

    With CA off peak EV plan pricing now above $0.16, plus other extra penalties I'm just not seeing how you get the Tesla advertized savings at all which they compare to $0.13/kwh. It's still a blast to drive with amazing performance, and I'll still likely get one in a few months but that's because I can afford it and not because I think I'll save money.

    Leave a comment:


  • childay
    replied
    You mean ya'll don't cath your kids for roadtrips?

    Leave a comment:

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