Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who is going to be the next United States President?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I think it will be Hillary as well.  Some one mentioned Rand Paul - I like a lot of what he has to say but ultimately a strict Libertarian as as bad as a strict Republican or strict Democrat.  I don't care much for Hillary but she may be the closest thing we can get to a moderate pragmatist.

    Comment


    • #17
      Anyone who wants to run for president should be immediately disqualified.

       

      If only we could adopt such a policy and force the most qualified people who have no interest whatsoever in the prestige of being an American president to run for president, then we might have a more functional situation.

       

      I agree with Hillary as the moderate pragmatist, much like President Obama.  I can't find any rational reason to fear Hillary over Trump. We can basically expect a continuation of Obama policy under Hillary which is predictable and for the most part good.  In the grand scheme of everything that could have happened in the 7 years of Obama's presidency so far, I would say he probably did better than 80% of all scenarios.

      As you may guess I lean left, but I agree with Jim that Romney would probably have been a good president.  I personally found it impossible to vote for him when he denied taking credit for RomneyCare in Mass even though it was very clear he was proud of that law when exiting office.

      My biggest peeve about circa-2015 right-wing politics is this constant repeating of the alleged fact that Obamacare is a disaster when there is essentially no evidence of this.  One could argue it has had little effect or that there are specific problems with it, but under no definition of the word 'disaster' does it fit.  It just seems that this has been repeated so many times that many consider it to be true.  I'm guessing that smart people like Mitt would agree with me but because of the extremism on the opposing position side, he could never say so in public.

       

      Watching Trump, I often wonder if he is posing as a radical right-winger and ready to publish a tell-all book or television series about being the darling of the poor/uneducated/fox-news-watching-only voters once he loses the general election to Hilary or Bernie.  Sort of like Stephen Colbert in the Colbert Report, only on a much grander, Trump-style scale.

      Also, I agree with Jim that the significance overall of who wins is small. We are not deciding between hugely different entities: Republicans vs. Democrats. If a Republican wins we can expect slightly lower taxes on higher incomes and higher chance of going to war somewhere in the world. If a Dem wins we are more likely to see expansion of some social programs and some very modest gun control efforts.

      I hope I have not said something that will cause the thread to spiral out of control.

      Comment


      • #18
        Probably Clinton but I think it will be closer than she was once thinking.

        As much as I tend toward the conservative financial spectrum I am worried that many of the republican field have untenable tax policies though. As a resident about to graduate I would love to be a recipient of Ted Cruz's 10% flat tax lowering my marginal rate a solid 25% or more but the swan song of "the economy will grow enough to pay for the tax cuts" just seems too good to be true and a true fiscal conservative shouldn't be trying to run up our country's deficit any more. More money in my pocket at the end of the day would be a good thing but only if the economy didn't tank and take all that extra invested money down along with it. Bush and Rubio are a bit more sensible but the the party has been hijacked recently. Also too much focus on social issues among the republican party trying to rally the base with half truths and full on misinformation about planned parenthood, is there really any still debate on global warming among scientists? and a general lack of decorum with respectful political debates.

        I think Bernie Sanders is the most honorable and truthful candidate and I do respect his integrity, while I do think that his economic views are a little too extreme for this day and age (though reigning in the big banks that run Wall Street and half of Washington would likely be a good thing).

        As usual, no perfect candidate. Way too much corporate buying of influence rather than regular people across the economic spectrum on both sides of aisle. Will be interesting to see how this all plays out, though I can't really remember an on the ground difference in my day to day life based on who was president, just changes in the newspaper titles here and there.

        Comment


        • #19




          I think it will be Hillary as well.  Some one mentioned Rand Paul – I like a lot of what he has to say but ultimately a strict Libertarian as as bad as a strict Republican or strict Democrat.  I don’t care much for Hillary but she may be the closest thing we can get to a moderate pragmatist.
          Click to expand...


          You sound like you should join me here:

          http://www.nolabels.org/four-goals/
          Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

          Comment


          • #20




            Probably Clinton but I think it will be closer than she was once thinking.

            As much as I tend toward the conservative financial spectrum I am worried that many of the republican field have untenable tax policies though. As a resident about to graduate I would love to be a recipient of Ted Cruz’s 10% flat tax lowering my marginal rate a solid 25% or more but the swan song of “the economy will grow enough to pay for the tax cuts” just seems too good to be true and a true fiscal conservative shouldn’t be trying to run up our country’s deficit any more. More money in my pocket at the end of the day would be a good thing but only if the economy didn’t tank and take all that extra invested money down along with it. Bush and Rubio are a bit more sensible but the the party has been hijacked recently. Also too much focus on social issues among the republican party trying to rally the base with half truths and full on misinformation about planned parenthood, is there really any still debate on global warming among scientists? and a general lack of decorum with respectful political debates.

            I think Bernie Sanders is the most honorable and truthful candidate and I do respect his integrity, while I do think that his economic views are a little too extreme for this day and age (though reigning in the big banks that run Wall Street and half of Washington would likely be a good thing).

            As usual, no perfect candidate. Way too much corporate buying of influence rather than regular people across the economic spectrum on both sides of aisle. Will be interesting to see how this all plays out, though I can’t really remember an on the ground difference in my day to day life based on who was president, just changes in the newspaper titles here and there.
            Click to expand...


            I saw much bigger "on the ground" differences when I was in the military. While the president doesn't have that much control over domestic issues, he certainly has a lot of control about where our troops get deployed!
            Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

            Comment


            • #21
              HRC will probably win, as she should if Trump is going to be her main opposition.  Trump is too divisive and inflammatory, and would do great damage to this country.

              It may be too late, and independents face long odds, but I'd like to see Michael Bloomberg give it a shot.  He can eschew the traditional political process like Trump, has political experience, and certainly understands finance.  I think he would be able to bring the sides together on tax reform, and also help build a moderate Supreme Court.  We are wasting far too much time in this country on social extremism.

               

               

              Comment


              • #22







                Probably Clinton but I think it will be closer than she was once thinking.

                As much as I tend toward the conservative financial spectrum I am worried that many of the republican field have untenable tax policies though. As a resident about to graduate I would love to be a recipient of Ted Cruz’s 10% flat tax lowering my marginal rate a solid 25% or more but the swan song of “the economy will grow enough to pay for the tax cuts” just seems too good to be true and a true fiscal conservative shouldn’t be trying to run up our country’s deficit any more. More money in my pocket at the end of the day would be a good thing but only if the economy didn’t tank and take all that extra invested money down along with it. Bush and Rubio are a bit more sensible but the the party has been hijacked recently. Also too much focus on social issues among the republican party trying to rally the base with half truths and full on misinformation about planned parenthood, is there really any still debate on global warming among scientists? and a general lack of decorum with respectful political debates.

                I think Bernie Sanders is the most honorable and truthful candidate and I do respect his integrity, while I do think that his economic views are a little too extreme for this day and age (though reigning in the big banks that run Wall Street and half of Washington would likely be a good thing).

                As usual, no perfect candidate. Way too much corporate buying of influence rather than regular people across the economic spectrum on both sides of aisle. Will be interesting to see how this all plays out, though I can’t really remember an on the ground difference in my day to day life based on who was president, just changes in the newspaper titles here and there.
                Click to expand…


                I saw much bigger “on the ground” differences when I was in the military. While the president doesn’t have that much control over domestic issues, he certainly has a lot of control about where our troops get deployed!
                Click to expand...


                Yeah I was thinking about this last night and while the president maybe doesn't have as much power as people think, the selection of president is still a big deal.  Besides deploying troops and waging wars (something congress doesn't seem to want to get involved with any more) the president seems to control most foreign policy including things like the Iran deal.  With the increased application of executive orders that's something that's only going to get more common, and then there's not only the Supreme Courts but plenty of other appointees to be decided.  The president also controls domestic projects like the Keystone pipeline, so really the importance of the election shouldn't be downplayed.  Now if only we had better candidates.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I don't like Career politicians and we may be surprised by just how many feel the same way.  I like Carson, but I don't think he is electable  Cruz tried to play the outsider game and now we find out, he got loans from one of the entities that helped orchestrate TWRSTGD (The Worst Recession Since the Great Depression).  :O)

                  I think Trump is much different in his day-to-day dealings than his bombastic style we see during the rally's and debates.  I think he could win and I would favor him over HRC.  We don't need any more social programs.

                  Obamacare may not be a disaster for the high earners or the low earners, but I think many outside of that have been affected in a negative fashion.  Although our deductible is lower this year, last year it was 10K.  Our premiums were about 12K.  My employer paid about half.  So I spent 6K for the right to spend another 10K.  This year the deductible is lower, but the premiums are higher.  And that is just medical.

                  cd :O)
                  Yet those who wait for the LORD Will gain new strength; They will mount up with wings like eagles, They will run and not get tired, They will walk and not become weary. -- Isaiah 40:31

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I find it interesting that, from what I can discern, there is a primarily conservative member base among participants here, who are (mostly) residents, attendings, or other career professionals. In my experience, most of the students at my school and other med schools where I have friends are more left-leaning and primarily basing their support on candidates' social policy ideals and personal integrity over fiscal/military/foreign policy; Bernie Sanders is far and away the most popular candidate among my classmates and most other young people I know. I wonder if my generation is truly different from the established, current generation of physicians, or if people will change their political priorities once we're at those later stages of training/life.

                    I won't pretend to know enough about each candidate's individual platform (aside from the latest media headlines) to make an informed decision yet... But I find myself a fan of Sanders due to his personal character.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Well, you know what they say: if you're 20 and not a liberal, you don't have a heart.  If you're 40 and not a conservative, you don't have a brain.  :P

                      Seriously, I lean a bit right but I have voted both Republican and Democratic in the past.  I vote for candidates, not parties.  Hillary Clinton is such a dishonest, self-serving, career politician that I don't understand how anyone could want her to be our President.  That's not to say that the Republican candidates are any great picks either though.  Say what you want about Trump, he certainly is a bombastic ******************, but he's also smart as ************************ and no other candidate has 1/10 of his business sense.  He would be the President to fix the economy.

                       

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        What other profession do we say we want someone with zero experience? That doesnt make much sense at all. Would you let a non medically trained person operate on your family?

                        Now, I am not head over heels for any of these candidates, we're stuck in a loop likely due to all the money in politics, we simply are not the ones choosing and havent been for a while. As long as were being factual, there has been no drastic increase in the use of executive orders, in fact Obama is on pace to either under shoot or be completely on par with Bush Jr, who was less than the prior other 2 term presidents before them going back into the 70s. You can search this information online.

                        I am pretty liberal/progressive, but not a fan of either of the supposed candidates, though I think HRC will win. Bernie, while I believe good intentioned probably believes too deeply some of his own rhetoric which makes very little sense at times. Demographics basically shut out any far right candidates (most live in cities, cities mostly liberal). A more well balanced person could have a chance but if youre not extreme these days you dont have a shot at the nomination.

                        The republicans have built themselves a near impossible obstacle course with their very radical primaries which makes them largely unelectable in a general election. Its something they have to turn around quickly or else they wont have a viable candidate, which is bad for both sides and the country in the long run.

                        I think HRC is a bit too hawkish and same old politicians. Trump would be a disaster, maybe he would about face as soon as he got in (he is smart), but a megalomaniac is not a good thing. Cruz might be worse, he wants it far too badly. Presidents dont have a lot of power and even less so over the business environment, congress is really the most powerful group in the country.

                        Comment


                        • #27




                          I find it interesting that, from what I can discern, there is a primarily conservative member base among participants here, who are (mostly) residents, attendings, or other career professionals. In my experience, most of the students at my school and other med schools where I have friends are more left-leaning and primarily basing their support on candidates’ social policy ideals and personal integrity over fiscal/military/foreign policy; Bernie Sanders is far and away the most popular candidate among my classmates and most other young people I know. I wonder if my generation is truly different from the established, current generation of physicians, or if people will change their political priorities once we’re at those later stages of training/life.

                          I won’t pretend to know enough about each candidate’s individual platform (aside from the latest media headlines) to make an informed decision yet… But I find myself a fan of Sanders due to his personal character.
                          Click to expand...


                          Everyone is liberal in med school, and I went to a med school in a very red state. People who pay a lot of taxes tend to run conservative.

                          I was talking politics with one of my partners the other day and he said he basically votes for any candidate who supports gay rights issues. He's not gay, but that's his #1 issue, which I found fairly foreign, because I'm not sure it is in my top 20 as far as issues go. So it isn't just your political beliefs, but also their priority that affects how you vote.
                          Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I'm a Rand Paul fan since I am socially liberal and fiscally conservative.

                            Bernie Sanders can go rot in Siberia.

                             

                            I fear both HRC and Trump.  Both will say and do whatever they need to get elected.  The only thing is that Trump may be less corrupt than HRC.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Voting on single issues is one of the absolute least productive ways to vote, especially when essentially nothing changes. Its been used to rile up bases and elect someone who does a whole slew of things that you may or may not agree with and nothing about that issue you care so deeply about. It has for a long time been abortion, maybe gay rights is the new one, but...seems really short sighted as that has been basically settled by the Supreme Court last year. I just cant imagine voting for someone based on their view on 1 thing or another, like that means we'll agree on everything or that either of us are right/wrong. Probably too nuanced for politics.

                              All these things like red/bue, city/rural, liberal/conservative are really just meant to divide us into 2 easy camps that in the end mostly keeps things the same. Im all for no labels and think I signed that years ago, but its such a good scam I doubt we get away from it.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                In general, I have voted for those that share values with my faith.  However, sadly, those values don't seem to be held as closely as they once were so I am being a bit more pragmatic and at least Trump values my faith.  The problem I have with experienced politicians is they tend to be already bought and paid for.  So in most areas of life, experience is good (you want experienced doctors, mechanics, plumbers, etc), but in politics the longer you are in, the more likely you have been "corrupted".  So Trump scores another point.  Trump does have experience as a negotiator and businessman, both I believe can serve him well.  He will surround himself with people that strengthen his areas of weakness, but will also learn as much as he can about those areas and be making well informed decisions.

                                Even in my 20s, I wasn't liberal, but I wasn't in college either. :O)  I had to work two jobs to support my growing family and I don't believe as a country we should be providing the amount of hand-outs that we do.  (I spent two years in college, but did not finish).

                                cd :O)
                                Yet those who wait for the LORD Will gain new strength; They will mount up with wings like eagles, They will run and not get tired, They will walk and not become weary. -- Isaiah 40:31

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X