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Partner wants to buy a Super Car worth 150k

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    https://ibb.co/HphmVqj

    FLP’s car, 28K out the door, superior to the ferrari in almost all aspects other than “exclusivity” LOL

    If FLP notices a scratch on the car, instead of hyperventilating, FLP will just shrug and move on with life.
    Click to expand...


    Are you wearing capri pants?

    Are those superior to regular pants because they were cheaper since it took less thread to make them? LOL

     

    On a serious note, what you describe is a general lack of caring. Personally, if I got a scratch on my Civic I would care a lot, not because its a cheap car, but because it's my car. Now if I got a scuff on my shoes, no big deal. However there are sneakerheads that would immediately go clean it off. Just because you don't care about something doesn't mean no one else should either.

    At this point, I think you are just trying to put others down to justify yourself not being able to afford such a car.

     

     

     

     

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    • I would guess that 90% of this forum could afford a 150k car. The reason they do not is because they do not want to or it would impact other financial goals.

      After the first couple of dings I don't care any more either. I got better things to spend my money on. Nobody would guess my car is a doctor car anyways.

      Comment






      •  




        https://ibb.co/HphmVqj

        FLP’s car, 28K out the door, superior to the ferrari in almost all aspects other than “exclusivity” LOL

        If FLP notices a scratch on the car, instead of hyperventilating, FLP will just shrug and move on with life.
        Click to expand…


        Are you wearing capri pants?

        Are those superior to regular pants because they were cheaper since it took less thread to make them? LOL

         

        On a serious note, what you describe is a general lack of caring. Personally, if I got a scratch on my Civic I would care a lot, not because its a cheap car, but because it’s my car. Now if I got a scuff on my shoes, no big deal. However there are sneakerheads that would immediately go clean it off. Just because you don’t care about something doesn’t mean no one else should either.

        At this point, I think you are just trying to put others down to justify yourself not being able to afford such a car.

         

         

         

         
        Click to expand...


        Yep your absolutely right. I can’t afford a super car, and I was hoping that after spending that kind of money on a Ferrari, EMD could post a picture of his here so the Fatlittlepig could salivate at it.

        Comment






        • I would guess that 90% of this forum could afford a 150k car. The reason they do not is because they do not want to or it would impact other financial goals.

          After the first couple of dings I don’t care any more either. I got better things to spend my money on. Nobody would guess my car is a doctor car anyways.
          Click to expand...


          Lordosis, my friend, we are strictly in the minivan club, definitely can’t afford to be driving unreliable, gas guzzling, high maintenance cars. Fatlittlepig proudly embraces this.

          Comment




          • I would guess that 90% of this forum could afford a 150k car. The reason they do not is because they do not want to or it would impact other financial goals.
            Click to expand...


            For a significant percentage of people on this high saver forum they could not only afford the $150K car but also not have it have any impact on their financial goals. The reason they do not get the car is that a $150K car does not excite them and they don't see the value for that money.

            I feel most comfortable driving a 10 year, $25K initial value car that is now worth $2-5K. Does the job, blends in well and has routine maintenance costs. I will leave it to others to buy the $150K car and keep the economy going.

            Comment


            •             Civic   Ferrari

              Price    $.        $$$$

              Gas guzzling.X   XXXX

              Unreliability X    XXXX

              Cost ownership X   XXXX

              Heated leather seats, CarPlay, Bluetooth, backup camera, LKAS, ACC etc (i don’t know if a ferrari has all of these things and I was too lazy to google it.)

              FLP only sees one of these cars that could be labeled a super car IMHO...

              (Also FLP definitely can’t afford a car that’s always going to be in the shop. Don’t have the time for that.)

              in addition I absolutely love it when people snicker at the thought of driving a Honda Civic. #stealthwealth

              Comment



              • fatlittlepig wrote:in addition I absolutely love it when people snicker at the thought of driving a Honda Civic. #stealthwealth

                Depends on which civic

                my husband just picked up a type r and I’ve learned way more about Civics than I’ve wanted to ?

                https://www.carthrottle.com/post/10-rwd-supercars-that-are-slower-around-the-nurburgring-than-the-new-civic-type-r/

                 

                Comment


                • Civic touring trim.

                  Comment


                  • Despite this thread running a very predictable course, I am glad to see there are some enthusiasts on this forum.

                    If you are being fiscally responsible, there is nothing wrong with splurging on a vehicle just like you would splurge on a boat, vacation, or kitchen remodel. I am always amused to see that some who consider a car simply a means of getting from point A to point B feel as if they are entitled to a pat on the back for keeping it low key. But even more than that, they seem to want to admonish those who care more about the experience than themselves. I can certainly appreciate the non-enthusiast's perspective but how come it never goes the other way?

                    I've loved automobiles from a young age and have driven a variety of cars with three pedals since I was a teenager. The visceral experience of selecting my own gears and feeling the engine do exactly what I want never gets old and makes my commute a rewarding part of my day. I have kept it modest but someday, when my loans are long gone and our financial health allows, I'd like to find myself in a used 911 that I plan to keep and maintain for a long time. I don't see any problem with that and don't know why a reasonable person would either.

                    Comment


                    • yes, honestly you 2 stop it.

                       

                      if you having nothing else to add to the OP please go bat your eyes at each other in a different thread.

                       

                      Comment






                      • Despite this thread running a very predictable course, I am glad to see there are some enthusiasts on this forum.

                        If you are being fiscally responsible, there is nothing wrong with splurging on a vehicle just like you would splurge on a boat, vacation, or kitchen remodel. I am always amused to see that some who consider a car simply a means of getting from point A to point B feel as if they are entitled to a pat on the back for keeping it low key. But even more than that, they seem to want to admonish those who care more about the experience than themselves. I can certainly appreciate the non-enthusiast’s perspective but how come it never goes the other way?

                        I’ve loved automobiles from a young age and have driven a variety of cars with three pedals since I was a teenager. The visceral experience of selecting my own gears and feeling the engine do exactly what I want never gets old and makes my commute a rewarding part of my day. I have kept it modest but someday, when my loans are long gone and our financial health allows, I’d like to find myself in a used 911 that I plan to keep and maintain for a long time. I don’t see any problem with that and don’t know why a reasonable person would either.
                        Click to expand...


                        I see cars as something quite different, to expound on earlier points.

                        The kitchen remodel thing is not a great analogy as you are adding value to your home. You can actually make money on a kitchen remodel fairly easily.

                        The vacation also falls a little flat as there is no way justify vacation dollars as anything other than just luxury spending. You are never going to have any kind of ROI on a vacation nor are you going to resell it.

                        A boat is something that people tend to either have or not have.

                        The point I made before is that a super car is a fantastically bad way to spend money marginally. If I got to Italy instead of not going, basically every dollar I spend is increasing my Italy experience over my staycation. The thing with a super car is that, again, most of what it can do that something like Corvette can't is illegal or dangerous. You can't even legally use the thing for what it's designed to do. That's my issue with this. You spend $100k more than you would for a vette and you experience that delta in very limited ways.

                        All discretionary spending is not the same. I could decide that I would only use the finest bath towels and I would throw them away after a single use. This would be hugely expensive but objectively stupid. Why do we all recognize it as stupid? Because I'm not experiencing anything meaningful by spending that money. I shrug and say "well I just love the feeling of a new, high-end towel" and you all say, "great, you're an idiot."

                        If you have it to spend and want to be a Ferrari do it, heck come pick me up and let me take a spin I'd love it, it's just a really dumb thing to do with money. If you have a bunch of money you can do dumb stuff with it.

                        Comment









                        • Despite this thread running a very predictable course, I am glad to see there are some enthusiasts on this forum.

                          If you are being fiscally responsible, there is nothing wrong with splurging on a vehicle just like you would splurge on a boat, vacation, or kitchen remodel. I am always amused to see that some who consider a car simply a means of getting from point A to point B feel as if they are entitled to a pat on the back for keeping it low key. But even more than that, they seem to want to admonish those who care more about the experience than themselves. I can certainly appreciate the non-enthusiast’s perspective but how come it never goes the other way?

                          I’ve loved automobiles from a young age and have driven a variety of cars with three pedals since I was a teenager. The visceral experience of selecting my own gears and feeling the engine do exactly what I want never gets old and makes my commute a rewarding part of my day. I have kept it modest but someday, when my loans are long gone and our financial health allows, I’d like to find myself in a used 911 that I plan to keep and maintain for a long time. I don’t see any problem with that and don’t know why a reasonable person would either.
                          Click to expand…


                          I see cars as something quite different, to expound on earlier points.

                          The kitchen remodel thing is not a great analogy as you are adding value to your home. You can actually make money on a kitchen remodel fairly easily.

                          The vacation also falls a little flat as there is no way justify vacation dollars as anything other than just luxury spending. You are never going to have any kind of ROI on a vacation nor are you going to resell it.

                          A boat is something that people tend to either have or not have.

                          The point I made before is that a super car is a fantastically bad way to spend money marginally. If I got to Italy instead of not going, basically every dollar I spend is increasing my Italy experience over my staycation. The thing with a super car is that, again, most of what it can do that something like Corvette can’t is illegal or dangerous. You can’t even legally use the thing for what it’s designed to do. That’s my issue with this. You spend $100k more than you would for a vette and you experience that delta in very limited ways.

                          All discretionary spending is not the same. I could decide that I would only use the finest bath towels and I would throw them away after a single use. This would be hugely expensive but objectively stupid. Why do we all recognize it as stupid? Because I’m not experiencing anything meaningful by spending that money. I shrug and say “well I just love the feeling of a new, high-end towel” and you all say, “great, you’re an idiot.”

                          If you have it to spend and want to be a Ferrari do it, heck come pick me up and let me take a spin I’d love it, it’s just a really dumb thing to do with money. If you have a bunch of money you can do dumb stuff with it.
                          Click to expand...


                          You are forgetting the value in a non corvette super car, is almost solely psychic, it makes people feel better than others, feel good about themselves, validating, etc....its like paying off your mortgage or something.

                          Comment


                          • I'll bite and chip in my $0.02.

                            First of all, your partner can get whatever he/she wants.

                            If it was my money, I'd look seriously at the upcoming 2020 Corvette. I agree with what everyone else has noted about this choice - mainly it's not exclusive and maybe not a true "supercar", but at about $75k (with Z51 performance package and some optional trim) it would be all the performance virtually anyone could handle, certainly on the street and probably on the track as well, and at a fraction of what the true "supercars" go for.

                            If one must have the designer label, then look at an earlier model Ferrari 360/430/California, any of which now go for under $100k used. I think the new Vette will spank any of them on the track, but that wouldn't be the primary motivation, I'm thinking, for that buyer.

                            And, even with all that performance and money spent, you could still be this guy in the Porsche 911 Turbo S getting passed on the track by a Miata!

                            https://www.roadandtrack.com/motorsports/videos/a29929/spec-miata-versus-911-turbo-s-track-battle-proves-driver-skill-is-everything/

                            Comment


                            • @MPMD

                              My post was not directed at you and I wasn't trying to jump in to a vette vs. supercar argument but it is an interesting thought experiment. Also interesting that all of a sudden since the C8 reveal, and before anyone has had the chance to drive, review, feel or hear the actual car, it has already become a new benchmark of sorts. I sure hope it lives up to everyone's expectations and proves to be reliable. That would be a great thing for the Auto industry.

                              Anyway, back to your original thought. You are trying to objectively compare things that are subjective for many enthusiast car buyers. It's not just the horsepower, the acceleration, and the cost. Cars handle differently, their chassis behave differently, their engines sound differently and have different characteristics and torque curves. Chevy has famously cheaped out on Vette interiors which might not be everyone's cup of tea. Other competitors may offer more refinement and in turn, a more rewarding driving experience. It's not just about speed.

                              Your bath towel analogy falls flat as well -- you can reuse a bath towel so of course throwing it out would objectively wasteful. Spending more on a car that subjectively better suits your taste is not the same thing.

                              (FYI I personally could never imagine myself spending anywhere near 100k or more on a car, at least not in today's dollars)

                              Comment






                              • Despite this thread running a very predictable course, I am glad to see there are some enthusiasts on this forum.

                                If you are being fiscally responsible, there is nothing wrong with splurging on a vehicle just like you would splurge on a boat, vacation, or kitchen remodel. I am always amused to see that some who consider a car simply a means of getting from point A to point B feel as if they are entitled to a pat on the back for keeping it low key. But even more than that, they seem to want to admonish those who care more about the experience than themselves. I can certainly appreciate the non-enthusiast’s perspective but how come it never goes the other way?

                                I’ve loved automobiles from a young age and have driven a variety of cars with three pedals since I was a teenager. The visceral experience of selecting my own gears and feeling the engine do exactly what I want never gets old and makes my commute a rewarding part of my day. I have kept it modest but someday, when my loans are long gone and our financial health allows, I’d like to find myself in a used 911 that I plan to keep and maintain for a long time. I don’t see any problem with that and don’t know why a reasonable person would either.
                                Click to expand...


                                Except that I would never splurge on a boat, vacation, or kitchen remodel. I don't "splurge." I don't accept the assumption that the more expensive option is more desirable. I don't agree that I really want a fancy expensive-thingy- and only my lack of money or fear of poverty restrains me. I would not want to drive or ride in someone else's wanna be supercar. They sound loud, uncomfortable, dangerous and annoying. Even worse if the driver wants to show off how illegally they can drive it. Offensively low gas mileage. Not only do I not want to own one, I want nothing to do with it.

                                I have long found it fascinating that many people, all evidence to the contrary, assume that everyone shares their desires. Smokers who assume that everyone wants to smoke, but some are intimidated by the fear of cancer. Drinkers who assumes that everyone wants to drink and those who do not suffer medical conditions that make it unusually dangerous or are recovering alcoholics. Fancy vacation enthusiasts who assume that everyone who can afford it would fly first class to stay in 12 star hotels in Rome. Car aficionados who believe that everyone WANTS a fancy, expensive, fast, exclusive car. None seem able to understand that not everyone wants any of those things. Not everyone has an endless list of things they want to waste their money on.

                                Rather than buy any of the above, I would prefer to pick up more shares of VTI. No maintenance. No liability. Very low tax cost and only on the money I actually receive in dividends. Long term likely to be worth more than I paid for them.

                                I toy with marketing a line of exclusive pencils. Carefully curated collections of fine #2's hand selected by the world's leading pencil authorities. Covered in gold paint. Owner's initials engraved by old world artisans in Paris. $50,000 each. Only the truly discerning will see the value. Does it do anything useful that a 20 cent pencil (which is how they start life before the gold paint) will not? Of course not. It is a pencil. But that is so not the point.

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