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Tonight is Apollo 11 night

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  • #46
    Landed flawlessly and great first pics from the surface. It only cost $3B and the Rover has a plutonium power plant. They could use some of that in Texas about now.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by dennis View Post
      Landed flawlessly and great first pics from the surface. It only cost $3B and the Rover has a plutonium power plant. They could use some of that in Texas about now.
      That helicopter gizmo too.

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      • #48
        Wow I missed it

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        • #49
          Somebody care to explain how this is different from the other expensive remote control buggies we’ve sent before.

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          • #50
            Navigation.
            https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/spacecraft/rover/
            Cute, a head a neck too!

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            • #51
              helicopter

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              • #52
                So we spent 3B to fly a remote controlled buggy to Mars to collect rock samples which we can’t retrieve until 2030, and as a bonus the buggy will fly a drone over Mars to take photos. Underwhelming.

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                • #53
                  If we have to spend the space money I would focus on finding ET.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by fatlittlepig View Post
                    If we have to spend the space money I would focus on finding ET.
                    I think that's one of the reasons they're doing the core samples and returning them, so they can look for evidence of life with sophisticated measurements with instruments they can't take there.

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                    • #55
                      Imagine where we would be if we spend that proposed student loan forgiveness money on space!

                      Yeah it is a lot of waste and fruitless endeavors but the science learned and the inventions created will be around forever. Unlike an expensive band-aid for a problem that will only last half a generation

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                      • #56
                        I’m more interested in finding intelligent life not some traces of some possible quasi microbes on some rock.

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                        • #57
                          *insert Uranus joke*

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by fatlittlepig View Post
                            I’m more interested in finding intelligent life not some traces of some possible quasi microbes on some rock.
                            Some interesting points. The ROI from the space programs directly has been to say the least, minimal. However, the unintended consequences and byproducts have been substantial. Mostly due to the need generated to solve problems that would not have been possible otherwise.

                            I agree that there are diminishing returns because I honestly don't think finding intelligent life in space is worthwhile. I would prefer finding intelligent life on earth! Sometimes that is a problem. Anecdotally, yours truly has my own shortcomings. No need to point out the obvious.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Tim View Post

                              I would prefer finding intelligent life on earth!
                              Maybe we should see if it exists right here on WCI before we search the earth. :-)

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by fatlittlepig View Post
                                I’m more interested in finding intelligent life not some traces of some possible quasi microbes on some rock.
                                We have been using radio telescopes and other equipment to see if other intelligent life forms exist in the Universe. The problem is the vastness of space. The video linked above on this thread gives a good idea what formidable challenge it is.

                                3B may seem excessive but we have just spent 2.6 Trillion on the coronavirus pandemic, some on dubious recovery programs. In that context the 3B is a drop in the bucket and might pay off big dividends. The scientists do not get paid as well from NASA as they would in the private sector. They are a bargain for the talents they bring.

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