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Tonight is Apollo 11 night

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  • #31
    my clever pla





    looking at the Sun)! 
    Click to expand…


    Hopefully you had the appropriate filters or invest in an ophthalmology practice.
    Click to expand...


    My clever plan is to eliminate that bane of astronomers, light pollution, by blinding the population, thereby rendering the use of streetlights and other nighttime lighting unnecessary!

    I was using a Coronado PST, which is a small H-alpha scope designed for safely viewing the sun.  It's lightweight and affordable, and perfect for daytime astronomy outreach.  A highly recommended purchase if you have any interest in solar observing!

    Comment


    • #32




      my clever pla





      looking at the Sun)! 
      Click to expand…


      Hopefully you had the appropriate filters or invest in an ophthalmology practice.
      Click to expand…


      My clever plan is to eliminate that bane of astronomers, light pollution, by blinding the population, thereby rendering the use of streetlights and other nighttime lighting unnecessary!

      I was using a Coronado PST, which is a small H-alpha scope designed for safely viewing the sun.  It’s lightweight and affordable, and perfect for daytime astronomy outreach.  A highly recommended purchase if you have any interest in solar observing!
      Click to expand...


      I have always had an interest but never any formal training.  It is one of those hobbies I have in mind for when I free up some personal time.

      My oldest is 5.  He is very much into constellations and learning about space and planets.  I got him a telescope but he does not have the patience and dexterity for it.  Not to mention I set it up to look at something and he cannot just simply look in but nudges it all over so he is looking at nothing.  I hope to help him develop these skills.  I figure as he gets into it I will have to learn to stay one step ahead of him.

      Also our definitions of affordable do not align haha.

      https://www.meade.com/coronado-personal-solar-telescope-pst.html

      Comment


      • #33
        I have been watching the 3 part series Chasing the moon which goes from the Sputnik days to the moon landing.

        Also 8 days - To the moon and back - the 8 days it took Apollo 11 from launch to splashdown.

        Comment


        • #34


          “The Last Question” which is probably my favorite short story is an example.
          Click to expand...


          I do love Asimov, and hadn't read this one.  It's a doozy--thanks for sharing!

          Comment


          • #35







            my clever pla





            looking at the Sun)! 
            Click to expand…


            Hopefully you had the appropriate filters or invest in an ophthalmology practice.
            Click to expand…


            My clever plan is to eliminate that bane of astronomers, light pollution, by blinding the population, thereby rendering the use of streetlights and other nighttime lighting unnecessary!

            I was using a Coronado PST, which is a small H-alpha scope designed for safely viewing the sun.  It’s lightweight and affordable, and perfect for daytime astronomy outreach.  A highly recommended purchase if you have any interest in solar observing!
            Click to expand…


            I have always had an interest but never any formal training.  It is one of those hobbies I have in mind for when I free up some personal time.

            My oldest is 5.  He is very much into constellations and learning about space and planets.  I got him a telescope but he does not have the patience and dexterity for it.  Not to mention I set it up to look at something and he cannot just simply look in but nudges it all over so he is looking at nothing.  I hope to help him develop these skills.  I figure as he gets into it I will have to learn to stay one step ahead of him.

            Also our definitions of affordable do not align haha.

            https://www.meade.com/coronado-personal-solar-telescope-pst.html
            Click to expand...


            Kids usually get the hang of looking through a telescope eyepiece somewhere around age 6.  Before then, even if they can see the object in the eyepiece, they can't really grasp what they are looking at.  In another year or two, your son will be ready!

            And the cost of a Coronado PST is cheap compared to the $2,000+ most dedicated hydrogen-alpha scopes run (plus you can use a photo tripod to mount it, which also lowers the cost).  Personally, if I ever win the lottery I'm splurging on this baby:  https://luntsolarsystems.com/shop/telescopes/hydrogen-alpha/152mm-telescopes/ls152tha-solar-telescope-double-stack-b3400-feather-touch-zoom/ (That price is just the scope; you still have to budget the cost of a mount for it.)

            The good news is that a telescope (solar or otherwise) is generally a one-time purchase.  They don't wear out.  My most-used scope is one I bought new back in the late 1980s; apart from the addition of one wide-field eyepiece I've added nothing to it over those 30 years, and it still works perfectly.  So astronomy doesn't have to be an expensive hobby, but the costs do tend to be front-loaded.

            Comment


            • #36


              So astronomy doesn’t have to be an expensive hobby, but the costs do tend to be front-loaded.
              Click to expand...


              I am going to defer these costs until I no longer have toddlers who will destroy my nice things!  But I see what you mean.  Little ongoing expense.  We live somewhat rural so it is not hard to get away from the light pollution.  However being in upstate NY our cloud cover is a problem.  I will have to get something before the 2024 total solar eclipse!  The partial 2 years ago was fun but I have never experienced a total.


              I do love Asimov, and hadn’t read this one.  It’s a doozy–thanks for sharing!
              Click to expand...


              No problem.  One of my life goals is to read everything he wrote.  Quite the undertaking.

              I recently finished his adolescent series under his pen name Paul French.  Kinda corny but fun

              He wrote a incredible  amount of short stories so that might take a while

              Also a ton of non fiction that I might pick and choose.  Some of them do not hold up to time as well as fiction.

              Comment


              • #37





                So astronomy doesn’t have to be an expensive hobby, but the costs do tend to be front-loaded. 
                Click to expand…


                I am going to defer these costs until I no longer have toddlers who will destroy my nice things!  But I see what you mean.  Little ongoing expense.  We live somewhat rural so it is not hard to get away from the light pollution.  However being in upstate NY our cloud cover is a problem.  I will have to get something before the 2024 total solar eclipse!  The partial 2 years ago was fun but I have never experienced a total.
                Click to expand...


                You have my condolences.  I did my fellowship in Rochester NY, and I think the year I was there the local astronomy club did more cloud-watching than actual star-gazing!

                For the 2024 eclipse, I'd suggest getting some binoculars (if you don't already have them) and a pair of safe solar filters for those binoculars.  And some solar eclipse glasses (which are very inexpensive).  An actual telescope is overkill for an eclipse.  If the scope you have for your son is a refractor or a solid-tube reflector, you can buy or make a solar filter for it and use that, though, if you're really keen to have a telescope for the eclipse.  But if it doesn't have a solid tube, don't chance it!

                The Cloudy Nights website has a good forum dedicated to solar viewing, where you can pick up all the info you need on how to make a safe solar filter.  i recommend paying them a visit (but do it well before 2024, as I expect that just like this last time, the filter material will sell out well in advance of the eclipse).

                Comment


                • #38
                  We were lucky to have the last 100% eclipse center right through out town and we could watch it right from my backyard. The weather gods were great to us and there was nary a cloud in the sky.

                  Comment


                  • #39




                    To reiterate Lordosis’ last point, take a few minutes and watch this video.  One of the best I’ve seen on the internet.  My kids can’t get enough of it.


                    Click to expand...


                    I showed this to my 5 year old.  It is 2 months later and he still wants to watch it every day.

                    Thanks a lot!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Hopefully we get some good footage of this event. I plan to tune in as my work schedule allows.
                       

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I really hope they put Marvin the Martian into the livestream somehow.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Lordosis View Post
                          Hopefully we get some good footage of this event. I plan to tune in as my work schedule allows.
                          I found out a few days ago that the Operations Lead for landing is the niece of the wife of my close classmate from medical school. It makes me proud, yet old and not so smart as a physician when compared to the rocket scientists, at the same time. I hope everything goes well as I know she will be on tenterhooks for those 7 minutes of terror, as they call it. If you see an Indian lady on the video, it is her.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Kamban View Post

                            I found out a few days ago that the Operations Lead for landing is the niece of the wife of my close classmate from medical school. It makes me proud, yet old and not so smart as a physician when compared to the rocket scientists, at the same time. I hope everything goes well as I know she will be on tenterhooks for those 7 minutes of terror, as they call it. If you see an Indian lady on the video, it is her.
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gm0b_ijaYMQ

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              I love how excited they are when they reach a milestone. There's a reason I don't work for NASA. I'd probably have forgotten to pack the parachute.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
                                I love how excited they are when they reach a milestone. There's a reason I don't work for NASA. I'd probably have forgotten to pack the parachute.
                                JPL/Cal Tech is filled with nothing but modest folks that have the brains that are difficult to even grasp.They have simply chosen to be pure scientists. Congrats to all. Self selection.

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