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Non 501c3 non-profit health insurer PSLF

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  • Non 501c3 non-profit health insurer PSLF

    I am considering a job offer from a non-profit health insurer that is not a 501c3 and am trying to determine if they qualify as a public service employer for PSLF purposes. (The name of the company is Cambia Health Solutions, Inc. – Oregon). It is complicated because this non-profit has subsidiary non-profits that appear to meet the requirements of a “public health employer,” anyhow I would have thought that the more general issue of whether non 501c3 non-profit health insurers meet the PSLF requirement. I can’t find any specific guidance in this area.

  • #2
    Have them fill out page 2 of the employment certification form and hope they approve it. Seems like that should hopefully work as one of the "qualifying services" as public health.

    https://studentaid.ed.gov/sites/default/files/public-service-employment-certification-form.pdf

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    • #3
      I know nothing of PSLF, but quite a bit about Estimated Prophet. ???

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      • #4
        Anyone have experience trying to figure out if an employer qualifies for PSLF without submitting the Employment Certification Form (ECF)? For instance, calling FedLoan and asking? I've been wondering if I were to switch jobs before the 10 years is up, how can I be certain that the new employer will qualify for PSLF? I understand that you need to be employed by a 501(c)3, so is looking them up on the IRS database or even a nonprofit directory enough? Knowing before signing on the dotted line would be best for my peace of mind because when submitting the ECF you're likely already at the job---and, God forbid, one that may not qualify. Articles like this one in the NYT make me anxious.

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        • #5




          Anyone have experience trying to figure out if an employer qualifies for PSLF without submitting the Employment Certification Form (ECF)? For instance, calling FedLoan and asking? I’ve been wondering if I were to switch jobs before the 10 years is up, how can I be certain that the new employer will qualify for PSLF? I understand that you need to be employed by a 501(c)3, so is looking them up on the IRS database or even a nonprofit directory enough? Knowing before signing on the dotted line would be best for my peace of mind because when submitting the ECF you’re likely already at the job—and, God forbid, one that may not qualify. Articles like this one in the NYT make me anxious.
          Click to expand...


          It doesn't *have* to be 501(c)(3), but that p much counts for automatic acceptance.  If it is nonprofit but not 501(c)(3), it has to meet certain qualifications or be in a particular sector.  Here's a screenshot of the sheet and the official pdf attached.

          Unfortunately, sometimes I think it matters who is sitting behind the desk reading these.  My wife's employer (who is 501(c)(3), for cryin' out loud) was rejected until she got on the phone with someone to straighten it out.

          The FAQ can also be pretty handy.

          ...anyway, to answer the question, the Dept of Ed just says that if you meet those requirements, then you should be good-to-go, but their guidance basically just says "apply and find out," which is very un-helpful and lousy for planning (obv).  I wonder if they'd let you forward-date an application with your employer signing it.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the responses, the info from DMFA is accurate (there is no way you could get a response from forward dating before the deadline for accepting any offer). The obvious solution would be a public listing from Dept of Ed with accepted/declined employers by year based on their evaluation of submitted forms (which hopefully they have internally anyway). My only play is to accept and then immediately submit, hope for the best, and be prepared to have to make my case when they decline. Here is some info I got from emailing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau:

            Non-501(c)(3)’s that provide certain services are eligible, but I don’t believe that Cambia Health Solutions would fall under the “public health” category. The Department of Education considers public health employer to be “organizations that employ nurses, nurse practitioners, nurses in a clinical setting, and full-time professionals engaged in health care practitioner occupations and health support occupations, as such terms are defined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.” https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/glossary#Qualifying_Public_Services. An insurance company does not seem to fall under fit the “health care practitioner” standard.

            I did not bother making my case to them since they are not the decision making body. I will post here when I get get a response from Dept of Ed.

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            • #7
              You don't necessarily have to be one of the BLS-defined occupations to qualify, but the organization has to provide those services. So if all they do is insurance, then I wouldn't think they'd qualify under that statute. If they do other things within that, the employer *might* still qualify, but I think it's a low-percentage shot.

              Interesting to note community services like social work weren't in there, unless they particularly pertained to the elderly...? Some strange choices and verbiage, there.

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              • #8
                Any update? The lack of transparency and info is shocking. I too am in a similar boat- looking to move to a health insurance company but want to see if it will be PSLF eligible.

                 

                Thanks!

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                • #9
                  Update from OP:

                  I took the position with the non-501c3 insurer and submitted the PSLF application, Fedloan Servicing accepted it and told me my employer was a qualifying employer for PSLF. All was good for 6 months until I received a letter from Fedloan saying they made a mistake and that my employer was not a qualifying employer and retroactively disallowed the payments I have made as counting for PSLF. As you probably know, this is exactly the situation that the ABA employees found themselves in. So now I am waiting on the resolution of that lawsuit.

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