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Poll: How much % taxable brokerage do you have?

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  • Poll: How much % taxable brokerage do you have?

    What percentage of total retirement savings do you currently have in taxable accounts?
    88
    0%
    7.95%
    7
    1-10%
    12.50%
    11
    10-20%
    13.64%
    12
    20-30%
    12.50%
    11
    30-40%
    7.95%
    7
    40-50%
    14.77%
    13
    50-60%
    6.82%
    6
    60-70%
    9.09%
    8
    70-80%
    9.09%
    8
    >80%
    5.68%
    5

  • #2
    48.5%

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    • #3
      48.9%

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      • #4
        I am about one third but it is growing way faster then everything else since half of my contributions go to it.

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        • #5
          lol, as I just read the other forum thread addressing this issue. Used to be in the 1-10% zone because my old company had an ESPP. But I've left and sold all the stock since it was with a single company and had passed the required 1-year vesting period. Used the proceeds to finish paying off student loans

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          • #6
            About 60%. Started off very low though...

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            • #7
              Just under 30% at the moment. Definitely growing.

              Wonder what the optimal proportion would be for an early retirement in your mid 40s.

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              • #8
                Quick and dirty math shows 72%. Increased significantly after I sold my house and added equity to the numerator/denominator. Dividend taxes are no fun.

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                • #9
                  I would think most physicians would have more money in taxable as there is no limit like 401 and ira. If you save 100k a year you can only put 19k in 401 and 6k in ira. Maybe hsa. But thats about it right? The rest would have to go into taxable account. Im not counting matching money as thats is coming from elsewhere. Therefore over many years taxable shoudl be higher percentage.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by STATscans View Post
                    I would think most physicians would have more money in taxable as there is no limit like 401 and ira. If you save 100k a year you can only put 19k in 401 and 6k in ira. Maybe hsa. But thats about it right? The rest would have to go into taxable account. Im not counting matching money as thats is coming from elsewhere. Therefore over many years taxable shoudl be higher percentage.
                    So you are assuming most physician make $500K/year? That is a pretty good salary, even for docs.

                    If people have W2 and 1099 income, they can do $19.5K in 401K/457 and then in their i401K they can put in another $58K. What about a 401a with post-tax dollars that you then flip into your Roth (MegaBackDoor Roth)? That could be another $20K+. Then, if you have a spouse working in the same organization, then double that.
                    Just my thoughts....
                    But maybe that is because I have LOTS in my retirement accounts, LOTS in real estate and only a little in taxable.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by STATscans View Post
                      I would think most physicians would have more money in taxable as there is no limit like 401 and ira. If you save 100k a year you can only put 19k in 401 and 6k in ira. Maybe hsa. But thats about it right? The rest would have to go into taxable account. Im not counting matching money as thats is coming from elsewhere. Therefore over many years taxable shoudl be higher percentage.
                      Not necessarily. While probably true for many employed docs, private practice owners can set up their retirement plans to max out both employEE and employER contributions. I benefited from this type of plan for over 20 years in my former group practice. Currently I'm at 40% taxable. Used to be 45-50%, but the past several years I've been bolstering my Roth accounts with MBDR and Roth conversions in my i401k.

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                      • #12
                        Wife and I each do 58k profit sharing contributions per year. Backdoor Roths x2. Max HSA. 529s for kids. Have built a net worth of 1.5m pretty quickly this way (some home equity in there too).

                        Doesn’t leave much extra for a brokerage account. I am a bit worried about that, but plan to take the money we are paying to student loans each month and reallocate it to brokerage contributions in a year or two when they are paid off.

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                        • #13
                          66%. Being military before the TSP, the only good option besides the 2K you could put in your own IRA (and not even a Roth then) was your own brokerage. So our brokerage account had a big head start as the easiest place to stash money for physicians x 2. We now max out our employer accounts with old people contribution limits (403b x 2, 457 x 2, 401a) and still put more away into brokerage because we only really live on one income.
                          Last edited by bean1970; 02-05-2021, 04:40 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SLC OB View Post

                            So you are assuming most physician make $500K/year? That is a pretty good salary, even for docs.

                            If people have W2 and 1099 income, they can do $19.5K in 401K/457 and then in their i401K they can put in another $58K. What about a 401a with post-tax dollars that you then flip into your Roth (MegaBackDoor Roth)? That could be another $20K+. Then, if you have a spouse working in the same organization, then double that.
                            Just my thoughts....
                            But maybe that is because I have LOTS in my retirement accounts, LOTS in real estate and only a little in taxable.
                            Yes, these set ups are all situationally dependent. Annually I have a 401a and 403b at $58k each, a 457b at $19.5k, my wife’s 401k at $19.5k, two BDRs at $14k, and a 457f at 25% of my salary. I still dump a lot into taxable but it is only ~30% of the current total. I don’t see the taxable accounts making up that much ground.

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                            • #15
                              75% taxable. Retired. Roth converting.

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