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Maintain state license, even with no plans to move?

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  • Maintain state license, even with no plans to move?

    I am a young 30s surgeon in my 2nd year of practice. I did my fellowship thousands of miles from my current practice and have no plans to move back to that state across the country. I have an active medical license there, and I was considering keeping it active because obtaining a new state medical license is so challenging. I realize that it is a very low likelihood of moving back. My DW wants to let it lapse because of the expense and tiny chance of ever moving back there.

    What do you think, is it worthwhile to maintain my medical license for a state in which I will likely never practice? As I write this, I feel it is probably best to not renew and reapply if the time ever came for us to move back across the country.  Then I can put that money to work paying off debt and investing.

    I appreciate any thoughts or input on this topic.

     

    Indexer

  • #2
    No.

    Is there an option to suspend? I did that with one of mine. Supposedly it is easier then to re-activate.

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    • #3
      .
      Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

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      • #4
        There is no right or wrong answer. Assuming you are paying with pre-tax dollars, if the after tax cost is less than $100, I might keep it; more, let it lapse. Likely not a big deal, either way.

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        • #5
          There may be a way to make your license "inactive" and and not have to pay the fees every cycle.  It can be easier to reactivate an inactive license than start the application process all over again.  In my state, you just have to pay a fee to reactivate and submit evidence of CME.

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          • #6
            It's hard to get a medical license?? During our rotations in other states and for fellowship, it was literally a form, $100 fee, and a copy of diploma. Took a few weeks... Never had a issue.

            I would let it lapse. Just like my resident license and my fellowship license.

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            • #7
              I had a NJ license while I did my fellowship in NY.  In the two years after I moved South and made trips to NJ I realized I never wanted to return to NJ to practice or live there. If I lost my current state license due to some issues it is unlikely NJ will not know of it and not revoke mine.

              So rather than pay fees every 2 years I decided to let my license lapse. Twenty years later, no regrets.

              YMMV

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              • #8




                It’s hard to get a medical license?? During our rotations in other states and for fellowship, it was literally a form, $100 fee, and a copy of diploma. Took a few weeks… Never had a issue.

                I would let it lapse. Just like my resident license and my fellowship license.
                Click to expand...


                Serious question?  Yes in many states it is extremely tedious and time consuming.  God help you if someone threatens a suit or you have some disciplinary actions or some such..

                OP: I let mine lapse.

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                • #9
                  Have you obtained your license in your new state?  Are you continuing to practice?

                  I would not let go of one branch until you have a firm grasp on the next.

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                  • #10







                    It’s hard to get a medical license?? During our rotations in other states and for fellowship, it was literally a form, $100 fee, and a copy of diploma. Took a few weeks… Never had a issue.

                    I would let it lapse. Just like my resident license and my fellowship license.
                    Click to expand…


                    Serious question?  Yes in many states it is extremely tedious and time consuming.  God help you if someone threatens a suit or you have some disciplinary actions or some such..

                    OP: I let mine lapse.
                    Click to expand...


                    Agree, we recommend our new hires start the process immediately when they accept a job with us (which is usually 6-12 months out).  It can literally take 3-6 months with a clean application right out of residency...yes heaven forbid if you've worked several places or have blemishes (justified or not).

                    "Inactive" was the term I was looking for in my post above, not "suspended".  I checked the website for my inactive license and there is a renewal fee plus a late fee which is the same amount.  So basically, the financial cost would seem to be an extra one re-licensing cycle; as I mentioned it is apparently easier to renew an inactive than to reapply.

                    @craigy, one would assume he is licensed in the state that he has been operating for two years otherwise we have a much more serious question to address!   

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                    • #11
                      I trained in one state and then moved, letting my license in the first state lapse

                      7 years later I got recruited back to my original institution (I am in academics) and was pleasantly surprised to find that since the application process was much easier since they still had copies of various documents (med school diploma, board scores) on file and I didn't have to re obtain or resubmit them

                      YMMV

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                      • #12
                        I'd be more inclined to keep the license if:

                        It is very difficult to license there.

                        They do not participate in FCVS.

                        You are employed by a hospital and not in private practice.

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                        • #13
                          i was told my a mentor never to get rid of license. other than your degree, the license is your lifeline to practice. it is all that is needed to hang a shingle. Should your practice get bought out, hospital buy out, hospital closed, hospital or practice leveled by an earthquake, lose your job, etc...you can quickly at least do locums or find another job without any lag time if you have more than one license.  nearly every state allows you to inactivate to save money. it is cheap insurance to your life-line.   I think job insecurity and job risks are much higher in these turbulent medical economic times than loss of life and most of us (I don't anymore) carry life insurance for that small risk.  and lots of people have "no plans to move".....and still end up moving.

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                          • #14




                            It’s hard to get a medical license?? During our rotations in other states and for fellowship, it was literally a form, $100 fee, and a copy of diploma. Took a few weeks… Never had a issue.

                            I would let it lapse. Just like my resident license and my fellowship license.
                            Click to expand...


                            Some states are quite onerous....like CA, Hawaii, NJ...to name a few

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                            • #15
                              I have CA, NY and now PA. Applying for Hawaii (long story). I'm keeping all of them. Need to figure out how to make them inactive to reduce fees.

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