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Private Practice Interview: First meeting etiquette

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  • VagabondMD
    replied
    My position to your asking loads of questions in advance depends a lot on some factors that you did not specify in the OP, mostly that get to the question of whether or not this job likely to be in high demand and what are your alternatives (other than staying put).

    If the job is in high demand and you are likely competing with dozens of others, I would be careful to not turn him off with an endless torrent of questions. That is not to say that you should not get all of the necessary basic information, but do it in a methodical fashion, with a purpose, not for sport.

    As someone who has been in the position to recruit and hire for PP, I have had the both opportunity to attempt to fill jobs for which we were desperate and to fill jobs for which we had a seemingly endless number of excellent applicants. For the former, I would have gladly answered any and all questions, up to and including playing virtual Trivial Pursuit. For the latter circumstance, I might have been more favorably disposed to the less inquisitive type, all things being equal.

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  • jhwkr542
    replied
    At first meetings, I always think it's important to first ask about work and practice dynamics (who splits up the work, how do you do it, etc), which will naturally lead into a pay/compensation package discussion.

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  • ENT Doc
    replied




    Thank you ! I’m planning to send him an e mail with some of the basic questions. Should I mention my current benefits/vacation/CME( which I’m sure are much better than what he is going to offer) just as FYI or just wait for his answers.
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    Honestly, I would seek other viable options in the area you want to go.  And perhaps even be ready to stay.  See if you can improve upon your current contract - faculty searches aren't necessarily cheap and you are a known commodity that was asked to stay on.  That says a lot - you are a known, positive asset.  If there's something that you could see sweetening the current situation then I'd ask for that.  Then, separately, you've explored multiple options in the area you really want to be, so that if the chairman says no to a bump in pay/benefits you can more easily walk away.  You also improve your leverage with the guy you're thinking about joining now - especially if he knows you are looking in the area (which I would probably state...curious to hear others' opinions on this).  It allows you to understand the market in that area so you can more reasonably suggest what is more typical and what you'd be comfortable with.  I'd just do lots of information gathering first, but don't ask too many question that will be later discovered when you ask to see the financials unless it's really important - like what's your A/R turnover or something.  No financials offered?  Walk away.  Find out if you're obligated to give your current job X months notice and what vesting issues there might be with a retirement plan.  Might even be worth delaying a matter of months for that benefit.  I don't think I'd mention what you are currently getting.  You'll know if it's a good deal or not and what suits your own utility.  When it comes to negotiate something higher, however, you want to do this from a position of strength - a willingness to walk away to a better option.

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  • Sid16
    replied
    Thank you ! I'm planning to send him an e mail with some of the basic questions. Should I mention my current benefits/vacation/CME( which I'm sure are much better than what he is going to offer) just as FYI or just wait for his answers.

    Leave a comment:


  • The White Coat Investor
    replied
    I certainly would not feel bad asking him any question that you or this entire community can think of to ask him. Ask them in advance. Ask them in person. Ask the ones you forgot later. Once the contracts are signed, you lose a lot of negotiating power so get as much information up front as possible from him and every other source you can find.

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  • Sid16
    started a topic Private Practice Interview: First meeting etiquette

    Private Practice Interview: First meeting etiquette

    Hi All, I enjoy reading WCI blog and forum and find it very helpful ! I'm 3 years out of fellowship and currently hospital employed. I'd be interviewing for a private practice position for the first time and would appreciate any assistance.

    I've stayed back as faculty at my program and we want to move back to our previous location where we already own a home. I'm interested in this job as it is close to our home and would love to explore PP opportunity. I've spoken to him over phone once and we will be meeting in a week or two. He has been a solo practitioner for more than 10 years and added a PA 2-3 years ago. He wants to cut down clinical duties to be able to focus on his other business.I've no information except base pay the first year that was stated on job description. I have written down lots of questions regarding pay, benefits, partnership track, practice set up, non compete etc.

    I don't want to put him off with too many questions but at the same time he is the only one that can provide me the information. What are the most important questions to ask during the first meeting ? Is there anything I should avoid ? Should I e-mail him some of the basic questions before I meet him.

    I currently make about 50 K more than what he is offering but I don't have much potential for growth. I've spoken to some people and heard he has a successful practice and has been doing well financially.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thank you !

     
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