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Thoughts on this article directed at the Millennial Physician

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  • Thoughts on this article directed at the Millennial Physician

    This article was recently posted and although it is directed at dermatologists, the points aren't derm specific. I'm super curious as to folks' opinion here, since I know there is a range of docs - young and more experienced. I'll let you know what I think after some responses are posted.

    http://practicaldermatology.com/2017/08/dear-millennial-physician/

  • #2




    This article was recently posted and although it is directed at dermatologists, the points aren’t derm specific. I’m super curious as to folks’ opinion here, since I know there is a range of docs – young and more experienced. I’ll let you know what I think after some responses are posted. Let’s jsut say there was a lively discussion about this article from both sides.

    http://practicaldermatology.com/2017/08/dear-millennial-physician/
    Click to expand...


    A lot of the points are fair and reasonable but the whole article comes off in a very condescending manner (although I'm sure it was written with good intentions)

    Sounds like a great person to learn from but not work for/with.....

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    • #3
      It's that type of mentality that makes young docs reluctant to join private practice these days. Last thing I would want is a senior physician "employer".

      Better to dance with the devil you know (corporate Med) than the devil you don't imo

      (Though I do agree with never speaking ill of another Doc but I don't think that's a generational thing one bit)

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      • #4
        I think that this article implies that Millenial Docs should be overly deferential to their senior colleagues. As the senior colleague, I think that is unnecessary.

        I would just be happy if my Millenial Doc colleagues came to work on time, stayed until the work was done, and did enough work to support 75% of their compensation!

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        • #5
          Well, my opinion echoes those above. Unfortunately this person doesn't think the tone should matter if the points are valid. Which is too bad. It's all about how information is presented. In the right tone, this could've been a GREAT article. Although some specific points were ludicrous .... needing permission before presenting yourself as an expert as a board certified physician?

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          • #6
            Absolutely painful to read. Very odd that it jumps around from "respect mah authoritah!" to fairly nitty gritty practice management stuff.

            It also makes me really glad that I didn't have to build a practice.

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            • #7
              Dude or dudette should find a different hobby (i.e., writing is not his thing...). He/she also sounds like a poor manager.

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              • #8
                I think the idea of being respectful and honest with your mentors/employers could have been summed up in a couple bullet points, not two dozen.  Further, this bears repeating to everyone, not just young docs.

                That said, the idea of respect for your elders does resonate with me: at times I have been floored by my interaction with some students and off-service residents.  I've always thought it was poor upbringing (by their professors and attendings) than any kind of generational thing!  And I'm also pretty sure my attendings said the same thing about me 20 years ago.

                We have hired many "millennials" and have had not needed to write a letter about a code of conduct; perhaps the author of the paper got a bad batch of apples?

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                • #9
                  I agree with the above sentiments. I think it's possible, and maybe even probable, that there are more millennial physicians out there who feel more entitled than their senior counterparts, but generalizing an entire age group of people is never a good way to get your point across. I also did not like the condescending tone of the article.

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                  • #10
                    This point was memorable:

                    18. Never tell someone more senior than you when you will meet them. Instead ask when they are available or if they are available at several times you know you can make yourself available.

                     

                    Really? Does he want to open their car door or fetch the senior doc lunch/coffee too?

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                    • #11
                      I am not the intended audience, but I didn't think the article was that condescending.

                      Lot's of repetition.  Could have been condensed into an intro of: What's the deal with kids these days?

                      Followed by two bullets:

                      • Treat people with respect

                      • Don't steal stuff or ideas


                       

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                      • #12
                        I'm not the intended audience at all. But I found it arrogant, condescending and emotionally tone deaf. There was a strong sense of chastisement and guilty-until-proven-innocent, despite the initial disclaimer. Address these issues with the person who has shown he/she doesn't get it. Otherwise it says more about the writer than the content.
                        My Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFF...MwBiAAKd5N8qPg

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                        • #13
                          Agree totally condescending.  Also most senior physicians are extremely knowledgeable. However, you might come across one that has not been keeping up with CME and is practicing medicine from 30 years ago. In that case, a any qualified physician (young or old) SHOULD speak up.

                          My mom had cancer and initially treated by a more seasoned oncologist.  As a physician I could easily look up the current standards of care for her cancer and they were not following standard protocol.  I expressed my concerns and the physician clearly was not uptodate on the current literature.  I had my mom move to another practice with another senior physician who WAS uptodate and they followed the NCCN guidelines.

                          My point is that not all physicians are practicing according to standard of care and if a millennial physician notices that, they should be able to point it out, which this article suggest otherwise.

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                          • #14
                            I'm a millennial med student, and I want to do PP if possible.  I've had mostly PP preceptors for 3rd year rotations, and they were better compensated and had better work/life balance+control than many employed physicians.  Of course, I feel like they were all very competent from a business stand-point, which is why they had time to take students--and they wanted to pass business "pearls" to me.

                            However, I would never consider working for this author.  I was given more respect as a student, let alone if I was a just-out-of-residency physician. The author seems worn out

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                            • #15




                              Absolutely painful to read. Very odd that it jumps around from “respect mah authoritah!” to fairly nitty gritty practice management stuff.

                              It also makes me really glad that I didn’t have to build a practice.
                              Click to expand...


                              The author joined her dad's practice.

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