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How to answer: what's your ideal salary?

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  • How to answer: what's your ideal salary?

    Hi everyone, I'm currently in the job market for the first time, as I'm finishing fellowship. So far I've been approached by recruiters, most asking the same questions, yet I don't know what to answer when asked what salary am I looking for?

    How should I approach this? Should I go for the median salary? Go for the mean? Ask more, if so how much % more?

    Appreciate it!

  • #2
    In negotiations, the first person who speaks loses. Ask them what their offer is first, and go from there.

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    • #3
      Ideally, you’d bring in whatever you produce minus your share of expenses.

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      • #4
        .

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        • #5
          The right answer is : There is Comp, the job and location to consider. Feel free to bring up any potential opportunities.

          The best answer for you is to find opportunities through networking, not through recruiters. The better opportunities often are not even found through recruiters.
          Even with a potential employer, you should respond such that they are free to make an offer. You negotiate after they make the first move. From there, the best bargaining chip is another offer or two, or three.

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          • #6
            So I should just backfire with "what's your avg pay?"or "what is your offer?".
            ​​​​​​this can also be said once speaking to the office/hospital group without it being uncomfortable?

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            • #7
              If you’re talking to recruiters then they know what the hospital/group will pay. They just want to know how much money they can make off of you.

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              • #8
                "it depends"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by HikingDO View Post
                  In negotiations, the first person who speaks loses. Ask them what their offer is first, and go from there.
                  I think this advice is often useful, but not universally true.

                  Sometimes throwing the first figure out there creates the anchoring point for the whole negotiation. Of course, one should only do this if one has a really good handle on the market.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah recruiters are horrible w this. I always say “$1mil for one day per week” and get them to laugh. Then say I have the same MGMA data you have so why don’t you just tell me what you are paying people currently and I’ll tell you if I’m interested. Saves a ton of time

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                    • #11
                      Speaking as an employer your best negotiating position is to know what new hires are being paid in your area. Then factor in the current wage inflation and ask for something near the high end. Best case, they offer it. Worst is they counter with something lower that may still be in an acceptable range to you. The key though is to be able to say, “I know new hires with my specialty have been getting XXX in your area.” If you are accurate, they will come close to it or you don’t want to work there.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HikingDO View Post
                        In negotiations, the first person who speaks loses. Ask them what their offer is first, and go from there.
                        I am declining to speak first
                         

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                        • #13
                          You need to know what others are getting. If you're just responding to an email, it's "negotiable"

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                          • #14
                            I'm sure I'll be perceived as a chump here. Been working at the same UC since finishing residency. Vaguely aware of average pay. I'm pretty sure I was in the bottom 25th percentile. I've gotten intermittent small pay raises over the years with contract renewals. I think I proactively asked for a pay hike maybe once or twice. It was family owned, but was sold last year to a corporation. Was going to ask for pay hike from the corporation, but when they gave me the contract it was market rate so for me it was a 40% raise plus options. Way more than I expected. So I can't complain.

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                            • #15
                              The correct answer is "go fudge yourself, I don't talk to recruiters". Don't go through a recruiter to find your next job, they are not looking out for your best interest. They will try to extract a 20-30K fee from your next employer that could be used for your signing bonus and besides hiding you from potential employers, they will make an employer less likely to hire you over someone who is not using a recruiter. It's not that hard to not use a recruiter, you can google whatever specialty you are in and make a few cold calls. Doctors don't mind cold calls from other doctors. It's in our nature to be helpful.

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