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  • MPMD
    replied
    Originally posted by Kamban View Post

    Me too. I heard Chicago is gorgeous in summer.
    i will pick the wine
    White.Beard.Doc is paying

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim
    replied
    Originally posted by Kamban View Post

    Me too. I heard Chicago is gorgeous in summer.
    MPMD recommended some really nice restaurants in the Windy City. Now that would be awesome. A farewell dinner.

    Leave a comment:


  • CordMcNally
    replied
    I honestly don't think a long drawn-out letter is better than a short and sweet email. We got a short and sweet resignation email not too long ago and we didn't take it as a slight at all. Some people need to be in different situations for personal or professional reasons. As long as there wasn't an issue the group didn't know about. Is this a democratic group, CMG, or hospital employed position? A resignation only needs a few things: your intent to resign and your last day. If you're retiring then feel free to get as wordy as you want. It isn't going to be practical to let all your colleagues know in person in EM. It may be months before you see them all.

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  • JBME
    replied
    Originally posted by VagabondMD View Post

    I actually do not like this explanation in the resignation letter. It can be construed as criticism and as a negative. The last thing you would want to do is open new wounds. You will need them to write letters of "recommendation" or at the very least, verification, for future licensing and credentialing for the next ten years or longer. You want them to think of you as a good guy/gal and nothing more than that.

    One more thing. I did this badly, early in my career, and it could have come back to bite me. When I resigned after two years in my first job, I told enough people such that it was widely known when I hand delivered my resignation to the head of the practice. It was disrespectful and not cool. Fortunately, he had the professional maturity that I lacked at the time and did not hold a grudge when he hired me back later in the same year.
    Fwiw while I see your point and forgot my exact words they didn’t come across as criticism. But yes always make sure your boss is the first person to know you are leaving

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  • VagabondMD
    replied
    Originally posted by JBME View Post

    This is a very sound strategy. One tactic I took the last time I quit, as it was clear I was no longer aligned with the direction my department wanted to go. For months they tried to convince me to get on board and why and I'd say why I didn't think this was a good idea. I realized soon enough that this wasn't going to work and went on the market. Once I secured a new job and had accepted, I put in my two weeks. I framed this as "you guys deserve to have the best team going forward with the new strategy. Thank you for giving me the chance to try to shift my mentality to be in sync with the new direction we're going in. I have determined that I am not able to do this, and thus I'm no longer the best person for this position. Thank you for giving me a chance, and best wishes finding someone who can now better perform in this role than I am able." Totally made them feel they had the freedom to choose while I remain convinced they were headed in the wrong direction.

    I think ultimately I would have been let go but my boss was one who didn't like conflict and I knew it, so I lifted a huge weight off his shoulders and I think he was really grateful.
    I actually do not like this explanation in the resignation letter. It can be construed as criticism and as a negative. The last thing you would want to do is open new wounds. You will need them to write letters of "recommendation" or at the very least, verification, for future licensing and credentialing for the next ten years or longer. You want them to think of you as a good guy/gal and nothing more than that.

    One more thing. I did this badly, early in my career, and it could have come back to bite me. When I resigned after two years in my first job, I told enough people such that it was widely known when I hand delivered my resignation to the head of the practice. It was disrespectful and not cool. Fortunately, he had the professional maturity that I lacked at the time and did not hold a grudge when he hired me back later in the same year.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lithium
    replied
    My take on all these professional formalities and theatrics:

    - most of us just aren't that important and valuable to these institutions (the hospital doesn't love us back). We'll be replaced and forgotten sooner or later. Several of us have multiple bosses, some of whom we haven't met, and we might encounter only a few times a year. Should we postpone our resignation date or wait until we return from vacation so we can sit down with all these people who barely know us, and who might not even care?

    - For those of us who are exceptions and are more difficult to replace, administrators can't afford to hold petty grudges against us for this kind of stuff.

    - Similar to relationships, there really is no good easy way to break up with someone to make them feel better about it. The best you can do is try to make it quick, honest, and less painful on yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • GIMD
    replied
    Let your boss and colleagues know in person, then keep it short and simple in your resignation letter/email. Stay low during the lame duck period; the less drama, the better. That's how I did it last year. I have seen some drama during the lame duck period and it has never led to anything good.

    Leave a comment:


  • GasFIRE
    replied
    Originally posted by JBME View Post

    This is a very sound strategy. One tactic I took the last time I quit, as it was clear I was no longer aligned with the direction my department wanted to go. For months they tried to convince me to get on board and why and I'd say why I didn't think this was a good idea. I realized soon enough that this wasn't going to work and went on the market. Once I secured a new job and had accepted, I put in my two weeks. I framed this as "you guys deserve to have the best team going forward with the new strategy. Thank you for giving me the chance to try to shift my mentality to be in sync with the new direction we're going in. I have determined that I am not able to do this, and thus I'm no longer the best person for this position. Thank you for giving me a chance, and best wishes finding someone who can now better perform in this role than I am able." Totally made them feel they had the freedom to choose while I remain convinced they were headed in the wrong direction.

    I think ultimately I would have been let go but my boss was one who didn't like conflict and I knew it, so I lifted a huge weight off his shoulders and I think he was really grateful.
    TL;DR It’s not you, it’s me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lithium
    replied
    Originally posted by JBME View Post

    This is a very sound strategy. One tactic I took the last time I quit, as it was clear I was no longer aligned with the direction my department wanted to go. For months they tried to convince me to get on board and why and I'd say why I didn't think this was a good idea. I realized soon enough that this wasn't going to work and went on the market. Once I secured a new job and had accepted, I put in my two weeks. I framed this as "you guys deserve to have the best team going forward with the new strategy. Thank you for giving me the chance to try to shift my mentality to be in sync with the new direction we're going in. I have determined that I am not able to do this, and thus I'm no longer the best person for this position. Thank you for giving me a chance, and best wishes finding someone who can now better perform in this role than I am able." Totally made them feel they had the freedom to choose while I remain convinced they were headed in the wrong direction.

    I think ultimately I would have been let go but my boss was one who didn't like conflict and I knew it, so I lifted a huge weight off his shoulders and I think he was really grateful.
    You could have just said "It's not you, it's me."

    Leave a comment:


  • JBME
    replied
    Originally posted by VagabondMD View Post

    All I can say is that the way MPMD is throwing around $150 bottlers of whiskey and wine, I cannot wait to be invited over for drinks at his place!

    I agree with a conversation with your immediate boss or chief of service prior to the formal resignation. The content of the letter may vary depending on the relationship and the employer (private practice vs. hospital vs. company). An email should be sufficient, but some entities might request a written letter, too.

    I recently (late 2020) resigned from three different positions. My resignation letters were along the lines of:

    "Dr. X,

    As we have recently discussed, I am officially resigning from xxx effective xx/xx/xxxx. I have enjoyed working with you and the others here at xx over the past x years and wish you and my other colleagues (or teammates, if appropriate) continued success in the future. Please do not hesitate to reach out if I can be of service to you in the future.

    Best regards, xx"

    Aside - My service chief at my longest standing position presented me with a $75 bottle of Cabernet on my last day.
    This is a very sound strategy. One tactic I took the last time I quit, as it was clear I was no longer aligned with the direction my department wanted to go. For months they tried to convince me to get on board and why and I'd say why I didn't think this was a good idea. I realized soon enough that this wasn't going to work and went on the market. Once I secured a new job and had accepted, I put in my two weeks. I framed this as "you guys deserve to have the best team going forward with the new strategy. Thank you for giving me the chance to try to shift my mentality to be in sync with the new direction we're going in. I have determined that I am not able to do this, and thus I'm no longer the best person for this position. Thank you for giving me a chance, and best wishes finding someone who can now better perform in this role than I am able." Totally made them feel they had the freedom to choose while I remain convinced they were headed in the wrong direction.

    I think ultimately I would have been let go but my boss was one who didn't like conflict and I knew it, so I lifted a huge weight off his shoulders and I think he was really grateful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kamban
    replied
    Originally posted by VagabondMD View Post
    All I can say is that the way MPMD is throwing around $150 bottlers of whiskey and wine, I cannot wait to be invited over for drinks at his place!
    Me too. I heard Chicago is gorgeous in summer.

    Leave a comment:


  • VagabondMD
    replied
    Originally posted by MPMD View Post
    assuming you have reasonable relationships with your bosses i would keep this as classy as possible.
    hand written thank you note (totally separate from resignation notice) with a $150 bottle of wine.
    this will likely be money well spent.
    note that a few disagreements doesn't take this strategy off the table, people remember stuff like this.
    All I can say is that the way MPMD is throwing around $150 bottlers of whiskey and wine, I cannot wait to be invited over for drinks at his place!

    I agree with a conversation with your immediate boss or chief of service prior to the formal resignation. The content of the letter may vary depending on the relationship and the employer (private practice vs. hospital vs. company). An email should be sufficient, but some entities might request a written letter, too.

    I recently (late 2020) resigned from three different positions. My resignation letters were along the lines of:

    "Dr. X,

    As we have recently discussed, I am officially resigning from xxx effective xx/xx/xxxx. I have enjoyed working with you and the others here at xx over the past x years and wish you and my other colleagues (or teammates, if appropriate) continued success in the future. Please do not hesitate to reach out if I can be of service to you in the future.

    Best regards, xx"

    Aside - My service chief at my longest standing position presented me with a $75 bottle of Cabernet on my last day.

    Leave a comment:


  • MPMD
    replied
    assuming you have reasonable relationships with your bosses i would keep this as classy as possible.
    hand written thank you note (totally separate from resignation notice) with a $150 bottle of wine.
    this will likely be money well spent.
    note that a few disagreements doesn't take this strategy off the table, people remember stuff like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bev
    replied
    Don't burn your bridges.

    Leave a comment:


  • White.Beard.Doc
    replied
    I would never give notice of resignation in an email first. I value my relationships with my colleagues too much. And most specialties in medicine are a small world, so I like to keep things very professional.

    First thought, I would meet with my director in person, let them know of my resignation plans, then send written confirmation by email shortly after the meeting to formalize and document, in writing, the exact situation.

    Second thought, what is your next move? Are you retiring? EM jobs are not easy to come by these days. And the word has gotten out. The match this year had 67 EM programs that did not fill. The med students heard that the job market was sh!t and they ran for the exits. What a difference a year makes!

    Leave a comment:

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