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Any civilian employee physicians working for the Army?

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  • Hank
    replied
    I have to disagree with Bev on a couple points. PX is open to DoD and Coast Guard civil servants, but not commissary (except overseas). No tobacco, alcohol, or military uniform items at the PX for civilians.

    You can carry your Federal Employee Health Benefit into retirement if you have at least five years of continuous coverage right before an immediate (not deferred) annuity. This means you could work from 57 to 62 and get health insurance in retirement. However, you couldn’t work from 30 to 35 and get the health insurance after you leave.

    To the extent that you have bond holdings, the G fund has some good properties. However, you probably want to be more heavily invested in C and S funds.
    if you separate from service, leave at least some money in the TSP. You can roll in money from a traditional 401(k) into the TSP. (You can’t roll in Roth money.)
    Once you have a good bit of retirement savings and want some / more bond holdings, the TSP is good for the G fund.

    I went with a high deductible health insurance plan for the HSA. No personal experience with Blue Cross / Blue Shield.
    Last edited by Hank; 07-15-2021, 01:27 PM. Reason: Corrected retirement for just five years of civil service. Also PX privileges are for DoD and Coast Guard civil servants. No luck for DoD contractors or civil servants with HUD, Social Security, Fores

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  • DrSam
    replied
    Originally posted by Bev View Post
    • Look at the "G" fund in your TSP account. Best bond fund you will find (IMHO).
    • Look carefully at the health care options you will have to chose from. Keep the same fund at least five years and then you will be able to take it with you when you retire. BCBS is the best (again IMHO).
    • You will also be able to take advantage of the commissary and PX. (new change for civilians)
    Thanks, I really appreciate this.
    Can you explain the health care stuff a bit further? Are you saying that the DOD will provide me with employer sponsored health insurance and that if I stay with them and that plan for 5 years or more, they will continue to provide this coverage after I leave?
    If so, that sounds pretty incredible actually.
    I wasn't actually looking at this job so much for benefits like retirement, but rather for the opportunity provided to help serve the troops for a bit and also for the opportunity to live in the specific location where this job is. That said, I like a buck as much as the next guy, so absolutely eager to maximize pay and benefits as much as I can.

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  • Bev
    replied
    • Look at the "G" fund in your TSP account. Best bond fund you will find (IMHO).
    • Look carefully at the health care options you will have to chose from. Keep the same fund at least five years and then you will be able to take it with you when you retire. BCBS is the best (again IMHO).
    • You will also be able to take advantage of the commissary and PX. (new change for civilians)

    Leave a comment:


  • DrSam
    replied
    Originally posted by bean1970 View Post
    i worked as a DoD civilian for 5 years. Since we are on a finance board, you will get a TSP with matching. Like anything government...administration moves slow, lots of paperwork for anything, a ridiculous amount of required annual trainings, the EMR is slow and stalls a lot (AHLTA stands for ah..let's try this again...)
    Ha ha. Hadn't heard the true meaning of AHLTA before.
    I spent a year in an Army clinic in Germany years ago. At that time, the EMR was called CHCS II. I actually got pretty decent with it, but this was back in 2004/2005, so I'm assuming things have likely changed since then.
    When I worked in that clinic, I wasn't a DOD employee, but instead was working for a staffing firm and only seeing non-active duty folks (dependents, other fed employees, and retirees), so all the employee specific stuff is a bit mysterious to me.
    Are there any user-friendly resources you might recommend to learn more about this stuff as well as perhaps to get some EMR training prior to starting the job?
    Thanks!

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  • bean1970
    replied
    i worked as a DoD civilian for 5 years. Since we are on a finance board, you will get a TSP with matching. Like anything government...administration moves slow, lots of paperwork for anything, a ridiculous amount of required annual trainings, the EMR is slow and stalls a lot (AHLTA stands for ah..let's try this again...)

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  • DrSam
    started a topic Any civilian employee physicians working for the Army?

    Any civilian employee physicians working for the Army?

    I've recently been offered a position in a U.S. Army outpatient clinic as civilian employee. I still don't know the final terms they will offer (in terms of salary/benefits), but suspect I will end up accepting the job. (Currently in the "hiring" phase where they are doing criminal background checks, etc. Not sure how long that stuff will end up taking).

    Anyway, wondering if anyone here is working in a similar position or has recently done so that might be willing to share their wisdom. I've never been a federal employee before, so this is all new (and somewhat confusing) territory for me.

    Cheers!
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