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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dontgetthejab View Post

    I will say he has ran it like this for close to 10yrs...
    I figure a reasonable defense is the supervising physician had every right to believe the midlevel was competent and working within their scope of practice which should put it back on the midlevel. Has anyone actually heard of a physician getting sued because of negligence by their midlevel?

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    • #32
      Originally posted by wideopenspaces View Post

      That's what I was thinking. I won't do PP because my own liability makes me too nervous, can't imagine taking it on for 7 mid-levels. No amount of money would be worth that constant fear.
      That’s just the cost of doing business in medicine. Private practice or not, if you make a grossly negligent mistake they’re going to come after you regardless of who your employer is (except the VA, I think). Your chances of getting sued are directly related to the number of patient encounters you have and not what kind of doctor you are.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Random1 View Post
        Hope he has a good malpractice policy , because it sounds like he will probably end up needing to use it.
        Kind of like most other doctors…

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        • #34
          Originally posted by wideopenspaces View Post

          That's what I was thinking. I won't do PP because my own liability makes me too nervous, can't imagine taking it on for 7 mid-levels. No amount of money would be worth that constant fear.
          I'm not sure I understand this. Obviously you would just buy malpractice insurance. You would be worried even if you were insured?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post

            That’s just the cost of doing business in medicine. Private practice or not, if you make a grossly negligent mistake they’re going to come after you regardless of who your employer is (except the VA, I think). Your chances of getting sued are directly related to the number of patient encounters you have and not what kind of doctor you are.
            I've had the pleasure of being sued which is how I know how much risk I can handle. I moved to the VA partially because of the effect the lawsuit had on me. I knew if I had another one within a few years I'd just straight up quit medicine. It was very stressful. So while some may be totally cool with 7x the risk of being sued (because7x the number of patients) I know with 100% certainty I am not and no amount of money would make me willing to take on that risk.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by AR View Post

              I'm not sure I understand this. Obviously you would just buy malpractice insurance. You would be worried even if you were insured?
              Maybe it's irrational but with my lawsuit I was initially named along with a handful of other docs. Because we worked for the university hospital eventually they took us all off and named the university instead. So I felt more protected. The case settled and I don't think the payout came from my individual policy, per se. Plus I knew we had the best lawyers in the state working for the university. In private practice it would just feel like you were on your own more. Certainly there would not be a larger organization to target and any payout would come out of your policy which has limits. And who knows about the quality of the legal team? Maybe I'm misunderstanding how all of this would work in PP but my experience was stressful enough and I had a lot of institutional support and a good outcome. I can't imagine going through it alone.

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              • #37
                I got hit with a threat of an above policy limit payout, so talk about stress. Go from being conservative your entire life, saving for the future and retirement and with one stroke of the pen you entire life savings and potential for retirement changes. Fortunately that did not happen , but it was over a year of sleepless nights and lawyer meetings. This was on top of the first 3 years of the the complaint. So I personally chose not to be responsible for any mid levels errors in judgement

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Sundance View Post
                  That guy/gal has it figured out. Good for him/her. All of us other lackeys better show on time tomorrow.
                  Ah yes, they’ve certainly figured it out. Super good for them to sell out the future of their profession for an easy buck. Surely there will be a plethora of jobs for all those residents finishing their eighth year of medical training, somewhere, maybe for half the pay, but who goes into medicine for the money anyway! And as far as all of those patients. Surely the mid levels have as much training and can deliver just as high quality care. After all, they did go to medical school anyway, they just did what we did in half the time! Have you heard that it’s actually harder to get into midlevel school than medical school? Talk about top tier students, wow! Hopefully if any of us are in need of psychiatric care they can get us on board to see one of the mid levels this week!

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by StateOfMyHead View Post

                    I figure a reasonable defense is the supervising physician had every right to believe the midlevel was competent and working within their scope of practice which should put it back on the midlevel. Has anyone actually heard of a physician getting sued because of negligence by their midlevel?
                    Without getting into specifics, a couple of CRNAs at my institution did some bad blocks and as a result, their supervising anesthesiologists/anesthesia company got sued and they had to switch malpractice companies.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by wcinewbie View Post

                      Without getting into specifics, a couple of CRNAs at my institution did some bad blocks and as a result, their supervising anesthesiologists/anesthesia company got sued and they had to switch malpractice companies.
                      Yeah, I have heard similar stories as well. My understanding is that it always comes back to the person supervising. I will supervise residents, but no one else. I know what education a resident has, where they are in their training, potential gaps in knowledge, etc. With an APRN I can't even be sure you did an appropriate screen for bipolar disorder or that you can spot a personality disorder, etc, etc. I am not interested in being liable for their mistakes. Especially when they are very likely being given patients too complicated for their level of training. Just a recipe for disaster in my mind.

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                      • #41
                        One thing we can always rely on in medicine is that we will find a way to screw over the next generation for a buck

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