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  • #16
    Originally posted by Dontgetthejab View Post

    yea I’m not saying that $400 is life changing. I’m just trying to say “thanks for your hard work, keep it up”...
    “Didn’t expect everyone’s concern. Maybe I’ll just buy lunch a few times..”

    The former is a personal statement which is exactly the message that you are intending. The difference is symbolic. The staff will “humble brag” all year about how you noticed their dedication. Kids, spouses, family, SO’s and close friends will get a positive mention. $400 is enough to be useful. You token of appreciation will be appreciated. Which is exactly your intent.
    I think you found your personal note. Memorial Day? Fourth of July? June 14th Flag Day?

    Lunch, not so much.

    I can guarantee your support staff already realizes that you are part of “we” rather than “them”. Keep it personal. They work for you but get paid by the hospital.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dontgetthejab View Post

      yea I’m not saying that $400 is life changing. I’m just trying to say “thanks for your hard work, keep it up”...
      ... Using words is often more meaningful than $. Publically vs privately can depend on the person. Take some time to recognize them, the Impact they have, make it sincere, personal and be specific if they've done something awesome.

      (gift is good too, but it's 10x better if you nail the words too.)

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      • #18
        Do something! They will appreciate your kindness.

        I also work in a system where we’re not allowed to give expensive gifts. However we think it’s important to show appreciation bc the techs/front desk staff deserve it & most work very hard. Everyone likes to be thanked, and small gestures are still nice. In the past/present we’ve done: grocery gift cards, Starbucks drinks before esp long clinic days, buy lunch for the staff few times per year (no rep lunchs allowed), take out the team for a yearly nice Holiday dinner (org doesn’t do a big party for the staff, pre-covid of course).

        The more money I have the more I like to be generous. It’s enjoyable and a win-win. They feel appreciated and I receiving the giving warm fuzzies.
        Last edited by eyecandy; 05-23-2021, 03:44 PM.

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        • #19
          If you do something, don't do it quarterly. They will come to expect it and if you decide not to do it, they will be mad.
          I think the gesture is nice but if you do it routinely, it is enabling the system. Which part of the country do you work? My MAs are fabulous but get paid a lot more! They make about $42-52K/year plus benefits but live in a HCOL area.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by SLC OB View Post
            If you do something, don't do it quarterly. They will come to expect it and if you decide not to do it, they will be mad.
            I think the gesture is nice but if you do it routinely, it is enabling the system. Which part of the country do you work? My MAs are fabulous but get paid a lot more! They make about $42-52K/year plus benefits but live in a HCOL area.
            Quarterly came to mind bc that’s when I get my production bonus ...I see your point though. Live in south texas...the range is $12-14 with benefits.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post
              I buy lunch for my staff about 3-4 times per year, and a small holiday gift. The docs together also get holiday gifts ($100) for each staff. You could do more, but what you’ve suggested may - may - be too much. You have to ask yourself if these gifts may contribute to an already imbalanced power dynamic between you and your $12/hr staff. Will they tell you when you’ve made a mistake? Will they favor you and your patients over another provider even if the other provider/patient has a more urgent situation? Would they cover for you if a patient complaint comes in? The ‘gifts’ you’re describing seem excessive in both amount and frequency/regularity to be considered a gift. They could be interpreted as incentives; or bribes. Even if not, they may unconsciously influence behaviors. There is a reason drug rep lunches and gifts are now prohibited by most reputable health care systems. Tread carefully.
              This seems like an odd way of looking at things. If we apply this logic to a small private practice, then we would conclude that it shouldn't exist. The "power dynamic" would be even more unbalanced as they would depend on the doc for the entirety of their compensation.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by AR View Post

                This seems like an odd way of looking at things. If we apply this logic to a small private practice, then we would conclude that it shouldn't exist. The "power dynamic" would be even more unbalanced as they would depend on the doc for the entirety of their compensation.
                That is understood in an employer employee relationship and managed accordingly. It is also a trap, as evidenced by innumerable stories of abuse by those in power. But this situation is different. He is not their employer, yet (inadvertently) may create a dependency situation. This operates outside of HR and thus offers no protections to his staff or to him. In my opinion it's well intentioned but ill advised.

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                • #23
                  I'd say go for it. From what you describe, admin is not going to be giving them a raise either way. I think it is a nice way to express your appreciation.

                  I would agree with perhaps making the gifts a bit random so they are not too expected. Sometimes I feel our staff no longer appreciates the Christmas bonus (was $2500 for each employee last year) because it is expected.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by FIREshrink View Post

                    That is understood in an employer employee relationship and managed accordingly. It is also a trap, as evidenced by innumerable stories of abuse by those in power. But this situation is different. He is not their employer, yet (inadvertently) may create a dependency situation. This operates outside of HR and thus offers no protections to his staff or to him. In my opinion it's well intentioned but ill advised.
                    I think that it is ill-advised too, but not for exactly the reasons you originally gave.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Gamma Knives View Post
                      I'd say go for it. From what you describe, admin is not going to be giving them a raise either way. I think it is a nice way to express your appreciation.

                      I would agree with perhaps making the gifts a bit random so they are not too expected. Sometimes I feel our staff no longer appreciates the Christmas bonus (was $2500 for each employee last year) because it is expected.
                      I hear u, less than half the staff thanks us for the Xmas bonus

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                      • #26
                        You wrote this is to say 'Thank You', but is it also to say 'please don't leave?'

                        I don't see it as enabling. Whether he gives the gifts / income supplements or not, the hospital admin will continue to pinch pennies.
                        Last edited by tylerjw12; 05-23-2021, 06:19 PM. Reason: Fix rypo :)

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                        • #27
                          Somewhat tangentially related: I was invited to open houses for the children of staff graduating high school this spring. I havent been to one in YEARS....whats an appropriate cash gift? Work closely w staff, havent met any of the kids

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                          • #28
                            I think it may be too much, especially if you're expecting to do it frequently.

                            We were in a similar position last year (thought not as understaffed as you), and our staff was really working hard. I tend to do smaller things that our office appreciates. For instance, hand-written notes with some soap last year, homemade baked goods, lunches from time to time. If we had a really hard day, I may do a Starbucks run. I save money/gift cards for my direct staff on birthdays and Christmas only.

                            It's hard when you see them pulling their weight and admin doesn't care. But at the end of the day, you can only do so much, and they may still leave or be unhappy. I know that money can be a huge help for a lot of our staff, but I agree with others that it might create the expectation.

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                            • #29
                              I would do it, but more random so no expectation. Always at the end of the week so they can enjoy the weekend with a little spending money in their pocket.

                              Cards without money.....money talks and you know what walks.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 8arclay View Post
                                Somewhat tangentially related: I was invited to open houses for the children of staff graduating high school this spring. I havent been to one in YEARS....whats an appropriate cash gift? Work closely w staff, havent met any of the kids
                                I’d do $100 atleast,

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