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Job Search and Contract Negotiations

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  • pulmdoc
    replied
    If you know exactly where you want/need to be, I recommend figuring out who potential employers are (if you aren't starting your own practice) and cold calling to find out if they are interested. Many job positions have not been formally advertised yet but are available for a quality candidate.

    If you are geographically flexible, I recommend national specialty journals in addition as they will often advertise jobs. Working with a recruiter should be a last option IMO simply because many of the places that are willing to spend big $$ on recruiters do so because they have difficulty attracting interest otherwise. Also, the recruiter's interest is in filling the position, not in making sure this is your dream job you will put down roots over. That doesn't mean that all the jobs being offered by recruiters are bad ones, just that it serves you well to figure out what makes them difficult to fill (geographic remoteness, super specialized field, high turnover etc) and figure out if you can live with that drawback or not.

    I found that the best way to figure out what the salary/benefits/etc should be for your field is simply to make lots and lots of inquiries. Specialty salary data from Medscape or Merritt Hawkins etc has some usefulness, but only as a general ballpark to know when an offer is crazy low/high (eg $200k for an orthopod or $400k for family practice). If you want to know how much an ENT makes in Denver, the best way is to look at the ENT jobs in Denver.

    When determining compensation plan, keep in mind that private practice jobs will/should pay on collections, because if there's no money coming in, there's nothing to pay you with. Hospital employee/academic jobs are more likely to use a salary or wRVU model because of payor mix (uninsured patients) or nonclinical responsibilities. So there is not likely room to negotiate a completely different comp model. Just make sure you have an accurate assessment of how much work it will take to earn what you want to earn. A job offer advertising $700k potential isn't really $700k if you want to work 50hrs/week and it would take 100hrs/week to reach that compensation level.

    Once you have a contract offer in hand, I do recommend having a lawyer review the contract to look for red flags, ideally someone experienced in medical contract law for your state. This is because law governing things like non compete clauses, severence, etc is state specific.

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  • childay
    replied
    If you know where you want to go you could just call the specialty practices or hospitals and ask.  A lot of jobs are not advertised but that doesn't mean they aren't looking.

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  • SValleyMD
    replied
    Posting details here of your specialty and different job setups/offers will probably get u better feedback than anywhere else.. unless u know a lot of the docs in your field in the area you're interested in

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  • VagabondMD
    replied




    I was curious if anyone had general tips for job search? I know the area I want to work in, approx city of 2.5 million. Surgical sub specialty. The other question is where to find information on contract negotiation? How to? What factors are important? Salary vs RVU vs mix vs collection va other. Where to find averages for compensation, collection/billing for your speciality? Has anyone used a service that searches for jobs and negotiates for you? Are lawyers a must? Sorry for all the questions and thanks in advance!
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    There are online resources for that info (i.e. Medscape), but they are not very accurate, IMO. You will get the best info on what is going in a market by networking with other people in the same field in that market, especially recent grads from your program.

    In my opinion, the best jobs are found by networking (we previously called that "word of mouth" ). Recruiters match the lower caliber (or unconnected) candidates with the lower caliber jobs, in my experience. Apologies if I offended anyone, but the best jobs seem to come from who you know, not a stranger.

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  • jfoxcpacfp
    replied




    I was curious if anyone had general tips for job search? I know the area I want to work in, approx city of 2.5 million. Surgical sub specialty. The other question is where to find information on contract negotiation? How to? What factors are important? Salary vs RVU vs mix vs collection va other. Where to find averages for compensation, collection/billing for your speciality? Has anyone used a service that searches for jobs and negotiates for you? Are lawyers a must? Sorry for all the questions and thanks in advance!
    Click to expand...


    We have satisfied clients of Jon Appino's firm, Contract Diagnostics. Another client has been happy with another firm but they are not advertisers so I'm not going to advertise for them. PM me if you want me to get the name for you.

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  • wozo30
    started a topic Job Search and Contract Negotiations

    Job Search and Contract Negotiations

    I was curious if anyone had general tips for job search? I know the area I want to work in, approx city of 2.5 million. Surgical sub specialty. The other question is where to find information on contract negotiation? How to? What factors are important? Salary vs RVU vs mix vs collection va other. Where to find averages for compensation, collection/billing for your speciality? Has anyone used a service that searches for jobs and negotiates for you? Are lawyers a must? Sorry for all the questions and thanks in advance!
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