Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dental student considering the switch (Accepted to MD)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46




    I hear what you’re saying, but let’s face it, you just finished up the hardest year of dental school. Setting denture teeth sucks.  Waxing crowns sucks. Prepping teeth in the lab to a 0.1 mm chamfer margin sucks…2nd year of dental school sucks. And in your 3rd year you’ll actually start applying what you’ve learned for the past two years. Before making a huge switch like this spend a little time in the patients mouth.  See what aspects of dentistry you enjoy. Maybe you’ll love shucking wisdom teeth…maybe you’ll hate it, but my guess is you haven’t done much clinical dentistry after your first two years. I’ve been out for 20 years and I still love the fact that I’ve never had to work more then 4 days a week.  I love my wednesdays off. I love finishing at 2:00 on Friday. I love being my own boss. I love my 6 weeks vacation every year. I know medicine offers tremendous opportunity as well, but I would strongly encourage you not to base your decision on two years of book work and lab work. Let me say it again, the second year of dental school is definitely the hardest and it sucks!
    Click to expand...


    This, a thousand times over. You haven't actually done dentistry yet, you've done the first two years of dental school, which I can say with certainty were the two worst years of my life from a professional/academic standpoint. Private practice is nothing like dental school, and is mostly actually enjoyable. Do I enjoy every day? Absolutely not, but as has been said, medicine has plenty to dislike about it as well.

    As for the physical concerns, every job has those, but back and neck problems are definitely a widespread problem for dentists, no question. Get a good pair of loupes, be conscious about your posture, and keep in shape, and that will help immensely.

    Comment


    • #47


      As for the physical concerns, every job has those, but back and neck problems are definitely a widespread problem for dentists, no question. Get a good pair of loupes, be conscious about your posture, and keep in shape, and that will help immensely.
      Click to expand...


      Cervical disc disease is a common problem for interventional cardiologists and radiologists. This occurs because of long hours wearing lead suits every day.

      One of the senior interventionalists at my university was disabled for a while, and then wore a special shoulder harness thereafter. I knew another cardiologist who collapsed during a case due to disc disease.

      One of my med school roommates (an interventional radiologist) lost strength in one arm and required surgery.

      Coal miners and lion tamers have more hazardous jobs, but invasive work isn't risk free.
      Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

      Comment


      • #48
        All the more reason to have a good disability policy as well.

        Comment


        • #49













          I am a pediatric dentist and during the second and third year of dental school considered applying to medical school. I enjoy my chosen profession, most days, pending on the crazy parents that are encountered, but there’s always a part of me that wish that I  did OMFS.

          Routine is good. Mostly everything becomes routine after awhile. The benefit of non academic OMFS is that most of the procedures you’re compensated well. Both professions are undergoing significant changes in the states with corporate dentistry and hospital. At the end of the day, you have to enjoy what you do and provide enough time to your family. Live to work or work to live. I am glad I am a dentist for the hours, autonomy, but there are days where being a cardiologist sounds more entertaining than being a janitor of the mouth…
          Click to expand…


          … and I’m a cardiologist who dated a couple of dentists back in the day, and envied their work-life balance.
          Click to expand…


          If you could do it all again, would you do dentistry for the lifestyle or redo cardiology? Would you mind the pay cut you’d be taking or not at all?
          Click to expand…


          Knowing what I know now, I would have majored in computer science and then earned an MBA from Stanford, but my only computer science exposure was Fortran using punch cards at the university main frame (1977), and I thought business school was for the slow kids who couldn’t handle medicine or law. (Yes, I really thought that. :-))

          Given a choice today between a DDS at 23 or a switch to med school, I would choose the DDS every time. The lifestyle is the only reason you need, but the money is likely to work out better as well.

          If you want to be a top-earning cardiologist, you’ll need 4 years of med school, 3 years of IM residency, 3 years of general cardiology fellowship, and then probably 2 years of EP or interventional fellowship. You’ll emerge at 31-33 under a mountain of debt (at least in US) and then you’ll continue to work just as hard as you did in training.

          Your youth will be gone. You can’t appreciate this cost now, but it is the highest price you’ll pay.

          You will probably make great money, but less than current cardiologists (at least in real terms), and maybe much less. You can’t embark on a 10-12 year plan in medicine with the expectation that the money is a given. If money is your goal, there are better paths.

          If I was a dentist at 23 I would have a giant pile of FU money by the time I was 33, and no one would be yanking me out of a deep sleep at 3 a.m. to run to the ER. The poor cardiologist would have a negative net worth at that age. He might pull ahead by 65 but at great cost in quality of life.

          If you don’t mind working your a** off and you want to make money, then earn an MBA at Wharton or Booth (or maybe NYU) and become an investment banker. That path is much quicker and the money is much bigger.
          Click to expand...


          I think that giant pile of FU money you speak of is unrealistic. Knowing many dentists, none of them had anywhere near FU money until 10-15 years into practice. The positive however is the lifestyle.

          And well... earning that MBA would have been great, but have you seen the competition to get into Wharton? About 100x tougher than getting into med school. lol :P I think you're underestimating how easy it is to get into a top MBA program

          Comment


          • #50







            I hear what you’re saying, but let’s face it, you just finished up the hardest year of dental school. Setting denture teeth sucks.  Waxing crowns sucks. Prepping teeth in the lab to a 0.1 mm chamfer margin sucks…2nd year of dental school sucks. And in your 3rd year you’ll actually start applying what you’ve learned for the past two years. Before making a huge switch like this spend a little time in the patients mouth.  See what aspects of dentistry you enjoy. Maybe you’ll love shucking wisdom teeth…maybe you’ll hate it, but my guess is you haven’t done much clinical dentistry after your first two years. I’ve been out for 20 years and I still love the fact that I’ve never had to work more then 4 days a week.  I love my wednesdays off. I love finishing at 2:00 on Friday. I love being my own boss. I love my 6 weeks vacation every year. I know medicine offers tremendous opportunity as well, but I would strongly encourage you not to base your decision on two years of book work and lab work. Let me say it again, the second year of dental school is definitely the hardest and it sucks!
            Click to expand…


            This, a thousand times over. You haven’t actually done dentistry yet, you’ve done the first two years of dental school, which I can say with certainty were the two worst years of my life from a professional/academic standpoint. Private practice is nothing like dental school, and is mostly actually enjoyable. Do I enjoy every day? Absolutely not, but as has been said, medicine has plenty to dislike about it as well.

            As for the physical concerns, every job has those, but back and neck problems are definitely a widespread problem for dentists, no question. Get a good pair of loupes, be conscious about your posture, and keep in shape, and that will help immensely.
            Click to expand...


            Thanks I messaged you!

            Comment


            • #51




              I think that giant pile of FU money you speak of is unrealistic. Knowing many dentists, none of them had anywhere near FU money until 10-15 years into practice. The positive however is the lifestyle. And well… earning that MBA would have been great, but have you seen the competition to get into Wharton? About 100x tougher than getting into med school. lol ? I think you’re underestimating how easy it is to get into a top MBA program ?
              Click to expand...


              .
              Erstwhile Dance Theatre of Dayton performer cum bellhop. Carried (many) bags for a lovely and gracious 59 yo Cyd Charisse. (RIP) Hosted epic company parties after Friday night rehearsals.

              Comment


              • #52







                I think that giant pile of FU money you speak of is unrealistic. Knowing many dentists, none of them had anywhere near FU money until 10-15 years into practice. The positive however is the lifestyle. And well… earning that MBA would have been great, but have you seen the competition to get into Wharton? About 100x tougher than getting into med school. lol  I think you’re underestimating how easy it is to get into a top MBA program
                Click to expand…


                You will be 10 years into practice at 33. Most physicians don’t have FU money after 10 years as an attending, but I did. PoF did. WCI did. Your presence on this website means you can learn how it is done. You might want to check out PoF’s “4 Physicians” series for a look at the numbers: http://www.physicianonfire.com/4-physicians/.

                I earned an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business (2008), which was ranked number 1 in the US by Businessweek and number 1 in the world by either The Economist or the Financial Times (can’t remember which) while I was there. Business school is much less competitive than medical school.

                Don’t sell yourself short. If you are “crushing school” as you report, then you’ll have no trouble. You don’t even need business school. If you can gain acceptance to med school then I’m sure you have the ability to obtain a job as an analyst at an investment bank. (That’s the pre-MBA, post-BS entry level.) You can earn a nice salary while learning if Wall Street is for you.
                Click to expand...


                Thank you for the insight!

                Look, I've always thought about working on Wall st, but I am Canadian as well, which doesn't help me much. I also don't even have an undergrad, but I've messaged you!

                If any surgical physicians are here, please comment your opinion!

                Comment


                • #53










                  I think that giant pile of FU money you speak of is unrealistic. Knowing many dentists, none of them had anywhere near FU money until 10-15 years into practice. The positive however is the lifestyle. And well… earning that MBA would have been great, but have you seen the competition to get into Wharton? About 100x tougher than getting into med school. lol  I think you’re underestimating how easy it is to get into a top MBA program
                  Click to expand…


                  You will be 10 years into practice at 33. Most physicians don’t have FU money after 10 years as an attending, but I did. PoF did. WCI did. Your presence on this website means you can learn how it is done. You might want to check out PoF’s “4 Physicians” series for a look at the numbers: http://www.physicianonfire.com/4-physicians/.

                  I earned an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business (2008), which was ranked number 1 in the US by Businessweek and number 1 in the world by either The Economist or the Financial Times (can’t remember which) while I was there. Business school is much less competitive than medical school.

                  Don’t sell yourself short. If you are “crushing school” as you report, then you’ll have no trouble. You don’t even need business school. If you can gain acceptance to med school then I’m sure you have the ability to obtain a job as an analyst at an investment bank. (That’s the pre-MBA, post-BS entry level.) You can earn a nice salary while learning if Wall Street is for you.
                  Click to expand…


                  Thank you for the insight!

                  Look, I’ve always thought about working on Wall st, but I am Canadian as well, which doesn’t help me much. I also don’t even have an undergrad, but I’ve messaged you!

                  If any surgical physicians are here, please comment your opinion!
                  Click to expand...


                  Surgical physicians?  Lol...I believe they're called "surgeons."

                  Do they call surgeons Mr. in Canada instead of Dr., like they do in England?  "I beg your pardon, that's *Mister* Smith.  I'm a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons; I've worked very hard to be called Mr instead of Dr."

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    No one tells you when youre young how physical these jobs are. Im fit and always have been (okay, it ebbs and flows) but I was surprised at how much I underestimated the physicality of the job.

                    Comment


                    • #55













                      I think that giant pile of FU money you speak of is unrealistic. Knowing many dentists, none of them had anywhere near FU money until 10-15 years into practice. The positive however is the lifestyle. And well… earning that MBA would have been great, but have you seen the competition to get into Wharton? About 100x tougher than getting into med school. lol  I think you’re underestimating how easy it is to get into a top MBA program
                      Click to expand…


                      You will be 10 years into practice at 33. Most physicians don’t have FU money after 10 years as an attending, but I did. PoF did. WCI did. Your presence on this website means you can learn how it is done. You might want to check out PoF’s “4 Physicians” series for a look at the numbers: http://www.physicianonfire.com/4-physicians/.

                      I earned an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business (2008), which was ranked number 1 in the US by Businessweek and number 1 in the world by either The Economist or the Financial Times (can’t remember which) while I was there. Business school is much less competitive than medical school.

                      Don’t sell yourself short. If you are “crushing school” as you report, then you’ll have no trouble. You don’t even need business school. If you can gain acceptance to med school then I’m sure you have the ability to obtain a job as an analyst at an investment bank. (That’s the pre-MBA, post-BS entry level.) You can earn a nice salary while learning if Wall Street is for you.
                      Click to expand…


                      Thank you for the insight!

                      Look, I’ve always thought about working on Wall st, but I am Canadian as well, which doesn’t help me much. I also don’t even have an undergrad, but I’ve messaged you!

                      If any surgical physicians are here, please comment your opinion!
                      Click to expand…


                      Surgical physicians?  Lol…I believe they’re called “surgeons.”

                      Do they call surgeons Mr. in Canada instead of Dr., like they do in England?  “I beg your pardon, that’s *Mister* Smith.  I’m a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons; I’ve worked very hard to be called Mr instead of Dr.”
                      Click to expand...


                      Lol!! Nono, SORRY for my poor terminology  ops:

                      Comment


                      • #56




                        No one tells you when youre young how physical these jobs are. Im fit and always have been (okay, it ebbs and flows) but I was surprised at how much I underestimated the physicality of the job.
                        Click to expand...


                        I saw that with dentistry. I went in not even thinking twice about the physical portion of the job. I was... young(er? )

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I'm 6 years out of dental school, but definitely remember how terrible the second year was. I remember wanting to get the ************************ out of there, cut my losses and fall back on my finance degree... I'm glad I didn't. If the crap you have to deal with in Canadian schools is anything like ours in the States, you've probably made it through most of your didactic courses and pre-clinical work. Setting denture teeth, waxing labs, cutting crown preps on plastic typodont teeth... Do what you gotta do to get through and move on to actual clinic work. It gets better. And when you get out of dental school and begin to practice you get to do whatever you want in your practice.

                          I can't speak for the comparison to medical school or their profession, but I'm happy with the life dentistry has afforded me. I would think long and hard before making the switch, especially if you see yourself being happier as a general dentist. The first two years of dental school were essentially hazing... you're almost there... stick with it, I think you'll be glad you did. Just thought I'd weigh in, since I've had similar thoughts.

                          Comment


                          • #58










                            I hear what you’re saying, but let’s face it, you just finished up the hardest year of dental school. Setting denture teeth sucks.  Waxing crowns sucks. Prepping teeth in the lab to a 0.1 mm chamfer margin sucks…2nd year of dental school sucks. And in your 3rd year you’ll actually start applying what you’ve learned for the past two years. Before making a huge switch like this spend a little time in the patients mouth.  See what aspects of dentistry you enjoy. Maybe you’ll love shucking wisdom teeth…maybe you’ll hate it, but my guess is you haven’t done much clinical dentistry after your first two years. I’ve been out for 20 years and I still love the fact that I’ve never had to work more then 4 days a week.  I love my wednesdays off. I love finishing at 2:00 on Friday. I love being my own boss. I love my 6 weeks vacation every year. I know medicine offers tremendous opportunity as well, but I would strongly encourage you not to base your decision on two years of book work and lab work. Let me say it again, the second year of dental school is definitely the hardest and it sucks!
                            Click to expand…


                            This, a thousand times over. You haven’t actually done dentistry yet, you’ve done the first two years of dental school, which I can say with certainty were the two worst years of my life from a professional/academic standpoint. Private practice is nothing like dental school, and is mostly actually enjoyable. Do I enjoy every day? Absolutely not, but as has been said, medicine has plenty to dislike about it as well.

                            As for the physical concerns, every job has those, but back and neck problems are definitely a widespread problem for dentists, no question. Get a good pair of loupes, be conscious about your posture, and keep in shape, and that will help immensely.
                            Click to expand…


                             
                            Click to expand...


                            I didn't see these replies before I posted. Well said.

                            Comment


                            • #59




                              I’m 6 years out of dental school, but definitely remember how terrible the second year was. I remember wanting to get the ************************ out of there, cut my losses and fall back on my finance degree… I’m glad I didn’t. If the crap you have to deal with in Canadian schools is anything like ours in the States, you’ve probably made it through most of your didactic courses and pre-clinical work. Setting denture teeth, waxing labs, cutting crown preps on plastic typodont teeth… Do what you gotta do to get through and move on to actual clinic work. It gets better. And when you get out of dental school and begin to practice you get to do whatever you want in your practice.

                              I can’t speak for the comparison to medical school or their profession, but I’m happy with the life dentistry has afforded me. I would think long and hard before making the switch, especially if you see yourself being happier as a general dentist. The first two years of dental school were essentially hazing… you’re almost there… stick with it, I think you’ll be glad you did. Just thought I’d weigh in, since I’ve had similar thoughts.
                              Click to expand...


                              Thank you so much for chiming in. I have sent you a private message

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                So... Still thinking of switching? Or sticking with it?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X