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  • #16
    Originally posted by jfoxcpacfp View Post

    Third segment - those who have grown up there who cannot imagine living anywhere else. Typically, these spouses tend to be more determined to stay put than the spouse who is from another part of the country. We do have one client who has managed to tear him/herself away to take a position in a midwestern city, leaving behind family and friends, and who keeps pinching him/herself about the financial/lifestyle difference, can finally afford a house, work less, nice ppl, etc.
    Those who grow up there and become physicians still fall into those two categories for the most part....

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    • #17
      Originally posted by snowcanyon View Post
      Those who grow up there and become physicians still fall into those two categories for the most part....
      And this forum can provide life changing education. Many med students and residents have zero idea of the impact of compensation, job, and location.
      The mantra on WCI is always on "live like a resident", but that ignores the reality of choices that career decisions are made.
      • A great public service would be a simple spread sheet filling in the blanks at a high level and how to find data to fill in the blanks.
      • An example spreadsheet with illustrations could be updated for purely illustrative purposes. The results of the sample of 3-5 would open up some eyes before choosing a residency or location. Publish it on SDN or open a separate section. Human capital is valuable for a physician, very little tools or data available.
      Just random thoughts for helping doctors get a fair shake in life.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by jfoxcpacfp View Post
        NYC (impe) is a very difficult place for almost any specialist to survive financially unless you are working a lot and/or start your own practice. Same in many places in CA but at least the weather is better.

        e=experience
        Seems to be a good place to be a cash-pay psychiatrist. Lots of wealthy, neurotic patients. Plus, if you don't actually cure anyone you have a lifetime stream of income!

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        • #19
          Thanks for all the thoughts (and entertainment) everyone!. Lots to continue thinking about.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Hank View Post

            Seems to be a good place to be a cash-pay psychiatrist. Lots of wealthy, neurotic patients. Plus, if you don't actually cure anyone you have a lifetime stream of income!
            If you need any convincing, listen to the Shrink Next Door podcast. If I ever wanted to monetize that, the blueprint is right there.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Pedsbound View Post
              Thanks for all the thoughts (and entertainment) everyone!. Lots to continue thinking about.
              Several Cost of Living comparison tools. This not an attempt to persuade. Some tools you can use to "benchmark" to give you ideas.
              Even things like ziprecruiter give you some feel for relative comps.

              One advantage of Psych in NYC, the "shrink" can have more issues than the patients and make money listening to potential solutions!
              Bad joke. Apololgies in advance to those Psych folks. Not too many from NYC here.
              .

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              • #22
                your best bet is to see if one the pediatric hospitalist groups does salary surveys. The hospitalists groups for internal medicine are always publishing survey results for salary/workload/etc. Just remember that it is difficult to compare salaries for hospitalist because their work loads can vary pretty widely. When I was doing hospitalist work, there were some programs that had the 7 on/7 off model, but then some just said 14 shifts per month with a certain number of night shift, and others with different work requirements just to get the base salary. So if you are comparing two programs, one could offer a salary of 260 and seem much more attractive then the place that offers a salary of 230, but then when you count the days that you have to work to get 260, they can actually be paying an equivalent amount per day shift/night shift, but just one place is requiring you to work more days/nights. The patient load varies pretty drastically as well, so of course a place that expects you to see 20 patients day while admitting new patients is going to be offering a much higher salary then a place that expects you to see 10 patients a day. If you want to find the highest playing hospital to work, your best bet is to look where there is not a local training program that is feeding them cheap labor in the form of new graduates who don't want to negotiate. I think that graduating residents tend to depress the starting salary of all physicians because they take whatever is offered and they obviously effect the supply portion of the supply demand curve. Hospitalists jobs are very much supply demand driven salaries (your salary is subsidized by the hospital for the value of having you work there vs other physicians who can't work for more then they can bill for a prolonged period of time).

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