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Do you even new patients bros?

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  • #46
    veterinary ophthalmology , large animal, small animal, animal hospitals etc. Vets run businesses. Some have fellowships and make the same work/life choices. I prefer the neighborhood family pet vet.

    https://vcahospitals.com/champions-northwest?utm_source=maps&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=VCA_Champions_Northwest_Animal_Hospit al

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    • #47


      So again, why would I busy up my already busy clinic for an extra $60 on a patient that in all likelihood won’t need surgery?
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      Because it's an extra 12 minutes of easy work and, you know, you're going to help that patient. And $60 after tax for 12 minutes of work seems like good money to me.

      Don't get me wrong, I would much rather see a nice ankle fracture than vague foot pain in every instance. But I think it's almost less work to just see them than to get more info about them to determine whether or not to see them that day.

      And the patient is happy they were seen in a timely manner. This thread was started when another professional wasn't given an appt in a timely manner. And he/she wasn't happy about it.

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      • #48
        A next week appt for a routine msk complaint isn't timely enough? I personally think our medical system wastes a lot of money by acting like everything needs to be seen today or tomorrow. A lot of things get better if you wait them out a week + conservative treatment that your grandma would tell you to do.

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        • #49


          A next week appt for a routine msk complaint isn’t timely enough? I personally think our medical system wastes a lot of money by acting like everything needs to be seen today or tomorrow. A lot of things get better if you wait them out a week + conservative treatment that your grandma would tell you to do.
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          This is also entirely correct. It's almost someone in a health related field who wants to be seen right away.

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          • #50
            If someone with an ankle sprain or something non-op comes in, I'll give the patient the option to come back in two weeks to be rechecked and to give the problem time or we can start TX now. I'd say 90% say give it time and majority of those don't come back.

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            • #51
              Another thing to think about is what the perception is of patients when you say you can get them in that day they call, or not for another x days.

              When I first started and patients came in with a surgical problem (something not urgent like carpal tunnel or trigger finger or basilar thumb arthritis), even though I had tons of open operative time I would only offer them days a week or two out. As I got busier and my schedule really got full I didn’t have a choice except to put people out 3ish weeks, but when I first started telling people I could operate the next day it made me seem desperate. I also felt like people were questioning why I wasn’t busy and if that was a sign that I wasn’t good. Obviously for fractures or urgent issues patients want to get in right away, and I want to take care of those early as well.

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              • #52
                Heel pain right to Ortho? Stop by the primary first.

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                • #53
                  The problem with healthcare is that there are a lot of "weak links" in the system.  The physician may want to see new patients/need new patients, but the office staff could be placing barriers to seeing new patients because it generates more work for them.   It's amazing how many people with no customer service skills/ no desire to interact with other human beings end up in these low wage front desk positions, whether it be in the doctors office, hospital, etc.   I don't think that it is solely because they are low wage positions either, its remarkable how you can go to a coffee shop at 5 am in the morning and get someone more responsive and cheerful then the person answering the phone at most doctors offices.  I went to the er recently as a patient, and was amazed when the patient in the room next to me who was stuck in the er for several hours got concerned because no one was performing neuro checks on him while he was in the er after he had spent all day being transferred from some community hospital for head bleed.  The ER RN, who apparently did not like that the room that they put us in felt too cold and was busy calling facility management, reassured the patient by asking if he was all neurologically in tact and then went back to ignoring him.   This was after the neurosurgery resident and er attending had promptly seen him, triaged him, and placed admitting orders to the the neuro icu, told the patient the plans were to carefully monitor his neuro exam, but the patient was stuck as a boarder in the er.  I don't think that the patient would have rated our facility as high even though it was just due to one nurse.

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                  • #54




                    The problem with healthcare is that there are a lot of “weak links” in the system.  The physician may want to see new patients/need new patients, but the office staff could be placing barriers to seeing new patients because it generates more work for them.   It’s amazing how many people with no customer service skills/ no desire to interact with other human beings end up in these low wage front desk positions, whether it be in the doctors office, hospital, etc.   I don’t think that it is solely because they are low wage positions either, its remarkable how you can go to a coffee shop at 5 am in the morning and get someone more responsive and cheerful then the person answering the phone at most doctors offices.  I went to the er recently as a patient, and was amazed when the patient in the room next to me who was stuck in the er for several hours got concerned because no one was performing neuro checks on him while he was in the er after he had spent all day being transferred from some community hospital for head bleed.  The ER RN, who apparently did not like that the room that they put us in felt too cold and was busy calling facility management, reassured the patient by asking if he was all neurologically in tact and then went back to ignoring him.   This was after the neurosurgery resident and er attending had promptly seen him, triaged him, and placed admitting orders to the the neuro icu, told the patient the plans were to carefully monitor his neuro exam, but the patient was stuck as a boarder in the er.  I don’t think that the patient would have rated our facility as high even though it was just due to one nurse.
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                    there's a weird culture of being miserable in hospitals/medical offices. I don't get it. everybody thinks they have it so badly

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                    • #55







                      The problem with healthcare is that there are a lot of “weak links” in the system.  The physician may want to see new patients/need new patients, but the office staff could be placing barriers to seeing new patients because it generates more work for them.   It’s amazing how many people with no customer service skills/ no desire to interact with other human beings end up in these low wage front desk positions, whether it be in the doctors office, hospital, etc.   I don’t think that it is solely because they are low wage positions either, its remarkable how you can go to a coffee shop at 5 am in the morning and get someone more responsive and cheerful then the person answering the phone at most doctors offices.  I went to the er recently as a patient, and was amazed when the patient in the room next to me who was stuck in the er for several hours got concerned because no one was performing neuro checks on him while he was in the er after he had spent all day being transferred from some community hospital for head bleed.  The ER RN, who apparently did not like that the room that they put us in felt too cold and was busy calling facility management, reassured the patient by asking if he was all neurologically in tact and then went back to ignoring him.   This was after the neurosurgery resident and er attending had promptly seen him, triaged him, and placed admitting orders to the the neuro icu, told the patient the plans were to carefully monitor his neuro exam, but the patient was stuck as a boarder in the er.  I don’t think that the patient would have rated our facility as high even though it was just due to one nurse.
                      Click to expand…


                      there’s a weird culture of being miserable in hospitals/medical offices. I don’t get it. everybody thinks they have it so badly
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                      Some of this is the doctors themselves. Always complaining and whining about something and overlooking the better part of everything. Yes, some things are terrible, but really, much better than many things, nothing is perfect, etc...You can choose what you focus on and elevate in your life. If many things are beyond your control, its much better if you focus on the good stuff and cause yourself to be happy instead of dour.

                      That and of course the bright cheery excited person probably doesnt want to work at a boring gross doctors office and your left with people who will settle for that in aggregate.

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