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Net worth change in 2018

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  • Net worth change in 2018

    I was dreading updating the spreadsheet for 1/2/19 to calculate my Net Worth (and compare with end of prior year) and much to my delight that despite the overall US broad stock market decline (and greater declines in small caps, value and international markets), my net worth rose by 2.3%. From the market peak (or at least from my closest monthly measurement from the market peak), I am down by 4.6%.

    The reason for the rise has a lot to do with a large cash cushion, my wife's company stock doing well, and the new money allocated to saving/investing.

    How did everyone else do?

  • #2
    Didn't change much, owing to the additional contributions in 2018.

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    • #3
      Similar situation. My net worth did grow a couple of percent from the beginning of 2018. Primarily due to a great savings rate and an increasingly conservative portfolio with essentially all new money going into bond funds or cash as I move to within a few years of retirement.

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      • #4
        NW +25%.

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        • #5




          I was dreading updating the spreadsheet for 1/2/19 to calculate my Net Worth (and compare with end of prior year) and much to my delight that despite the overall US broad stock market decline (and greater declines in small caps, value and international markets), my net worth rose by 2.3%. From the market peak (or at least from my closest monthly measurement from the market peak), I am down by 4.6%.

          The reason for the rise has a lot to do with a large cash cushion, my wife’s company stock doing well, and the new money allocated to saving/investing.

          How did everyone else do?
          Click to expand...


          probably the fact that you are both still working also helped improve your position.

          I'm up about the same due to similar reasons except no wife stock situation.  I donated six figures in 2017 and significantly less than six figures in 2018.

           

           

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          • #6


            I donated six figures in 2017 and significantly less than six figures in 2018.
            Click to expand...


            Same here. Actual cash donations were de minimis. Overall contributions to charity were our largest ever (because there was more money than ever before in the DAF).

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            • #7
              Retired:
              No deposits, one withdrawal simply to top off taxable income in a tax bracket. No change in allocations or holdings. Got a really nice haircut! First trim in years.

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              • #8
                +16% primarily due to an aggressive savings rate. Increase tempered by market performance and new home purchase-which we are enjoying, but don't get me started about what a great investment a home is. Ha, ha.

                 

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                • #9
                  Down around 800K.  Trying not to figure it out.  I had assumed it was over a million so I was relieved.

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                  • #10




                    Down around 800K.  Trying not to figure it out.  I had assumed it was over a million so I was relieved.
                    Click to expand...


                    You just couldn't stay away from that Bitcoin. 

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                    • #11
                      +0.96%, excluding real estate appreciation (Having learned from my mistakes, I just ignore this).

                      I have lots of bonds and stable value, so investment portfolio was down just 2.5% including new money. Debt payoff accounts for the gain.

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                      • #12
                        this question is probably meant for those who have already saved a bunch already. My wife and I really only started to super-charge the path this year. Retirement accounts grew 12% this year but that's probably because we contributed a lot more (contributing 17% of pay in the past, and that was 25% in 2018). Our retirement accounts in 2016 and 2017 grew anywhere from 35-45% thanks to growth and contributions.

                        We also paid down a bunch of debt in 2018. So between the super-charged retirement contributions and debt paydown our NW increased by 608%....but that's b/c 2017 end of year net worth was only $35k! Now over $200k. we're snowballing here

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                        • #13
                          our holdings had an increase of 1.7% (i don't index).

                          our net worth was up 3.7% (primarily due to less spending with kid in college (all his expenses are gone).

                           

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                          • #14




                            this question is probably meant for those who have already saved a bunch already. My wife and I really only started to super-charge the path this year. Retirement accounts grew 12% this year but that’s probably because we contributed a lot more (contributing 17% of pay in the past, and that was 25% in 2018). Our retirement accounts in 2016 and 2017 grew anywhere from 35-45% thanks to growth and contributions.

                            We also paid down a bunch of debt in 2018. So between the super-charged retirement contributions and debt paydown our NW increased by 608%….but that’s b/c 2017 end of year net worth was only $35k! Now over $200k. we’re snowballing here
                            Click to expand...


                            That's a good point. The more you have in the stock market, the more you lose when the market swoons (at least on paper).

                            One of my buddies is agonizing over the daily market moves since September. He is 60, and his wife just retired about 18 months ago. They were supplementing his income with withdrawals from their retirement accounts. For the first year or so, they seemingly lived off of the dividends with little or no erosion of the principle and perhaps even some growth of the nest egg. Over the last few months, however, the withdrawals are exacerbating the market volatility and declines. It's a good lesson on how you might feel when you are living off the nest egg exclusively.

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                            • #15
                              +38% per personal capital

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