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  • Compensation Data

    Stumbled upon this on Becker's (via MGMA data for 2015):

    http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/compensation-issues/2015-physician-compensation-work-rvu-by-specialty.html

    Did a spreadsheet (attached) to see compensation/wRVU per specialty.  I've seen previous discussions about contracts and wRVU payments.  I haven't looked at the raw data, but this may help some people understand their contract a bit better, particularly for younger docs starting out.  Thoughts?  Do these seem to jive with what others have seen or that they have in their contracts?

  • #2
    Anesthesiologist here. I'd be working 3 days a week and bored out of my mind if I was making 10,000 rvus. 16-18,000 rvus is what I produce.

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    • #3
      -delete-

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      • #4




        Anesthesiologist here. I’d be working 3 days a week and bored out of my mind if I was making 10,000 rvus. 16-18,000 rvus is what I produce.
        Click to expand...


        How do you calculate your RVUs in anesthesia? I'm employed by a PP and paid a salary but there is nothing in my contract about RVUs and my compensation is based purely on hours worked. My husband is cardiology and that looks about right for his contract.

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        • #5
          I think that the RVU numbers are off. In our radiology practice, we are currently averaging 12,500 RVUs per rad (benchmark 10,000-14,000), and our net (W2) compensation is about $36/RVU.

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          • #6
            In reply to the anesthesiologist, check with your billing people. They bill the insurance companies for every case that you do. Each case has a startup RVU and a time component. So the total RVUs for that case times the 'usual and customary' charge per RVU would be what your bill would go out as. Every insurance company pays you either a fixed dollar number per RVU as in Medicare or Medicaid, or as a percentage of the usual and customary number. When you put all the money earned into a pot and divide by the total number if RVUs billed, you get a 'average' value for RVU in your practice. It can obviously vary from practice to practice, depending on your payor mix. Generally, inner city practices and rural hospitals have a much lower RVU as compared to suburban ones. This is a great way to evaluate any practice that you intend to join. Of course, not many groups will give you this information if you're an employee.

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            • #7
              Rad senior resident. The compensation/wrvu looks quite high for rads. Some telerads offer $18/wrvu (or less), awful. Some rads corporations offer $24-$31/wrvu. May be different in hospital employed of PP setting.Would be curious to know if this is the case. Of course the ratio would be increased if factoring $$ from ownership in Imaging Centers/Ancillary services.

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              • #8
                I don't think the $/rvu is as important in comparing specialties as total salary is. That's helpful for benchmarking your own $/rvu within your own specialty, but seems like apples to oranges across specialties.

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                • #9
                  In our practice (anesthesiology) RVUs are averaged across everybody and then the group pays out a set hourly rate which is the same for everyone. Average salary is about on par with the table above. The range in the group is low 200s for those working a couple days a week to high 600s for those working 5 days/week plus call.

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                  • #10
                    those numbers for psychiatry are eerily accurate. I'd say within 5% of what I see in real life. ~4000 wRVU, paid at about $60 each.

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                    • #11
                      Interventional Cardiology is pretty spot on.., 600k at 9-10k rvu.

                      This also shows that CT surgery is still doing well despite the stories you hear.

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                      • #12
                        if our interventional cardiologists only made 600 they would quit on the spot.

                         

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                        • #13
                          Agreed on psychiatry. I frequently see wRVU in contracts between $60 and $65. Becker lists it as $62.50. This seems to fit with compensation v. overhead quite well for our specialty. I am paid based on collections, but I end up right at $65/wRVU.

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                          • #14
                            I agree that the rvu number is off a bit. For hospitalists the income number is pretty darn accurate. But to make that much the rvu's at our program would need to be in the 5000 range.

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                            • #15




                              Agreed on psychiatry. I frequently see wRVU in contracts between $60 and $65. Becker lists it as $62.50. This seems to fit with compensation v. overhead quite well for our specialty. I am paid based on collections, but I end up right at $65/wRVU.
                              Click to expand...


                              Are these inpatient or outpatient jobs?

                              I get $51/RVU inpatient only, though I also have a stipend so it isn't strictly RVU based

                              5000-5500 WRVUs yearly not working particularly hard.  I suspect outpt WRVUs are lower per encounter

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