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How often do you check your net worth?

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  • #31
    Once a year in mid-January.  During the Great Recession I skipped a year which I believe helped me immensely in adding to positions and protecting myself from loss aversion.  I couldn't imagine looking at those losses every month back then and having the guts to keep investing.  Not looking at the grand total constantly still helps me stick to my plan.

     

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    • #32
      every few months w/ google sheet.

      i tried mint but i don't love feeding all of my bank/Fid pw into a third party site.

      mint also tries to include a Zestimate for my property which has been wildly overly optimistic for a while (overvalued by ~$200,000). it's fun to imagine that's my actual NW but... it aint.

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      • #33
        Use Quicken to track Net Worth/Finances.  I never have quicken retrieve/populate my transactions or look up prices of mutual funds and such, rather send to Quicken.  I will determine Net Worth as of calendar quarter ends, though it is mainly to validate/correct issues between the share count at Vanguard vs. what I have in Quicken.  I have created an excel spreadsheets to show our overall retirement asset allocation that I use once per year as a basis to rebalance the portfolio.

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        • #34
          I like to check it in a bull market.  I stop checking it in a decline.  The only reason to check in a down market is for tax loss harvesting or Roth conversions.  I follow day to day expenses and check for fraud with quicken for Mac.  I generate a rolling 12 months of expenses this way.  I check this almost daily.  I check net worth via Personal Capital.

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          • #35


            I like to check it in a bull market.  I stop checking it in a decline.
            Click to expand...


            Do you find the habit you get into by checking more often during a bull market makes it harder to not check during a bear market?

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            • #36




              every month that we reconcile bills on quicken. It shows right at the bottom. I’m kind of surprised on how many folk don’t use quicken as it automates bookeeping with banking and investment quite well all together.
              Click to expand...


              I too am surprised at the number of people here who are experts at Excel, for a group that does not deal with finance as their main line of work.

              I use Excel for really basic functions. I have had Quicken since the DOS days of 1990. The $60 or so spent on the Home and Business version every 3 years is one of the best investments I have made. I have separate files for my office, home, spouse's accounts and even kid's UTMA at Vanguard. Downloading deposits, checks ( online and physical) credit cards etc and reconciling are a snap. I don't have to worry about the hacking of online sites where we store info  or if the next big thing today will be bankrupt in 3 years.

              My net worth shows up that the right hand bottom corner whether I like it or not. Since many real estate and business properties cannot be valued correctly until they are sold it underestimates them, which is better than overestimating them, and I like it that way.

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              • #37





                I like to check it in a bull market.  I stop checking it in a decline. 
                Click to expand…


                Do you find the habit you get into by checking more often during a bull market makes it harder to not check during a bear market?
                Click to expand...


                I think a lot of this behavior dates back to the late 90s-early 2000s when I owned a lot of individual stocks.

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                • #38
                  Quarterly. I use a Google docs spreadsheet in which security prices update in real time, but I try not to peek at the totals ( harder when we are going straight up like we have been ). My sheet does have my stock/bond ratio and domestic/international ratio right at the top so I know when I need to rebalance without checking actual numbers.

                  Once per quarter I update the share totals in the spreadsheet, which I then transfer to an Excel spreadsheet, which updates my graphs. And the Excel spreadsheet uses those totals to forecast future inflation-adjusted, after-tax income using a 4% withdrawal rate and a 3% real rate of return at ages 55, 60, and 65. I declared we reached FI when the age 55 number first exceeded our current annual spending, plus there will be social security.

                  Not comfortable at all with the aggregators.

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                  • #39
                    I used to check very infrequently, but now that I have Personal Capital it pops up whenever I'm not being intentional and looking my phone. I'm afraid this habit will be really disastrous when the market corrects, so I'm trying only look when I want the information to make a specific choice.

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                    • #40







                      Personal Capital as well.  It’s really nice being able to aggregate everything in one spot.  I check it more than I should lol
                      Click to expand…


                      Same here.  I check it most days.  I find it interesting to see how my portfolio stacks up against the S&P 500.  You can see it for the day, month, 90 days, year-to-date, custom, etc…

                       
                      Click to expand...


                      Can you do all that on the app, or are you using the computer to check all those things?

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                      • #41
                        Yes PC calls it the You Index. It graphs your portfolio's performance vs the S&P, Dow etc.

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                        • #42




                          It’s a hassle to log into the websites of multiple financial institutions to assemble our liquid net worth, but I’m wary of providing all of our passwords to a single aggregator.

                          None of you share that concern?
                          Click to expand...


                          I do. At Schwab I can enter my outside investment holdings in their portfolio analysis tool. So I aggregate at a place I use and trust anyway. I only see it if I intentionally go look at it. So I never accidentally peak at the total.  From threads at Bogleheads it appears Vanguard has a similar option but less user friendly.  IDK about Fidelity.

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                          • #43
                            I couldn't get Personal Capital to access all my accounts, but the bigger issue is that for the last two years I can't get them to stop calling me from San Francisco and leaving voice mails to pitch their overpriced advisory services.

                            98%+ of my net worth is in my brokerage/retirement accounts and house, so I can just total most of it by adding outside investments to any of my brokerage accounts.  The downside is I have to update changes manually for the most part.  I like the Morningstar Instant Xray through T Rowe Price's the best, because it automatically displays the percent (down to a hundredth of a percent) each one takes up in the allocation and also shows the performance of every fund and etf year to date.
                            I sometimes have trouble reading private messages on the forum. I can also be contacted at [email protected]

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                            • #44
                              This has been a change for me. I used to check it once a year to rebalance between two funds. Now that it can be done so easily and I am near retirement, I tend to check it after a good day in the market to see how much more I earned compared to working that day. I think it makes the idea that I won't be earning money from working soon much easier to accept.

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                              • #45
                                I have mint to follow up regular expenses and check weekly. I update net worth spreadsheet and charts quarterly in excel. I'm trying to wean myself down to check this less often. I don't have any taxable accounts right now so no need to worry about tax loss harvesting.

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