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Is Dental School worth 450K debt?

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  • #31
    Are there any schools that your state may have a reciprocal relationship with in which you could pay in-state tuition? I know my dental school did with a couple other states.

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    • #32




      Are there any schools that your state may have a reciprocal relationship with in which you could pay in-state tuition? I know my dental school did with a couple other states.
      Click to expand...


      No, unfortunately there is nothing like that in my state. I live in a very small state btw

      Comment


      • #33
        I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn't like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession...there are just too many variables in the world and life.

        PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

         

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        • #34




          I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

          PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

           
          Click to expand...


          Thanks for the input Hawkeye....To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency--you can start working and earning an income right after graduation.....When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)...

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          • #35
            Well if I knew I didn't want to do dentistry as a profession (or any other field for that matter(, I wouldn't even consider it anymore.  No good work hours and salary are worth hating your day every day for 30+ years.  There are plenty of great professions to enter that have decent hours and pay; in fact, the sky is almost unlimited despite what the world tells us constantly.  If a person is excellent, the world will seek that person out as they move through along in their career.   May I suggest that you find something that you might enjoy doing, has a good financial future, and work very hard at becoming great at it at?  I will state that with very high probability that you will be successful if you do that.

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            • #36







              I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

              PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

               
              Click to expand…


              Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
              Click to expand...


              I'm not sure what we are debating then.

              Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn't passionate about...

              Comment


              • #37










                I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

                PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

                 
                Click to expand…


                Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
                Click to expand…


                I’m not sure what we are debating then.

                Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn’t passionate about…
                Click to expand...


                While I don't find actual Dental work to be that interesting (drilling & filling teeth, crown & bridge work, endo, etc)----how many careers enable one to work 35-40 hours a week, directly help people, have a less than 1% unemployment rate, and still enable one to make over a 6 figure income?

                Comment


                • #38













                  I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

                  PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

                   
                  Click to expand…


                  Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
                  Click to expand…


                  I’m not sure what we are debating then.

                  Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn’t passionate about…
                  Click to expand…


                  While I don’t find actual Dental work to be that interesting (drilling & filling teeth, crown & bridge work, endo, etc)—-how many careers enable one to work 35-40 hours a week, directly help people, have a less than 1% unemployment rate, and still enable one to make over a 6 figure income?
                  Click to expand...


                  There are plenty plenty plenty of great careers with good benefits and a decent life IF one becomes excellent at it.  The ONLY way to become excellent for most of us is hard hard hard work early on, in both training and the actual career.  There are usually few shortcuts.

                  And btw, it wasn't dentistry itself that I didn't find interesting but rather is was the fact that I was going to be confined in small office every day that I didn't like.

                  Comment


                  • #39













                    I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

                    PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

                     
                    Click to expand…


                    Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
                    Click to expand…


                    I’m not sure what we are debating then.

                    Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn’t passionate about…
                    Click to expand…


                    While I don’t find actual Dental work to be that interesting (drilling & filling teeth, crown & bridge work, endo, etc)—-how many careers enable one to work 35-40 hours a week, directly help people, have a less than 1% unemployment rate, and still enable one to make over a 6 figure income?
                    Click to expand...


                    It seems like your mind is already made.

                    I would encourage you to re-read all the responses before you take that leap of faith.

                    Choosing to pursue something because of the superficial factors you listed isn't terrible in a vacuum. Choosing that pathway with a $450000 debt burden suddenly becomes a lot less attractive. And becomes downright disastrous if you aren't able to make it to the finish line.

                     

                    Comment


                    • #40
















                      I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

                      PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

                       
                      Click to expand…


                      Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
                      Click to expand…


                      I’m not sure what we are debating then.

                      Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn’t passionate about…
                      Click to expand…


                      While I don’t find actual Dental work to be that interesting (drilling & filling teeth, crown & bridge work, endo, etc)—-how many careers enable one to work 35-40 hours a week, directly help people, have a less than 1% unemployment rate, and still enable one to make over a 6 figure income?
                      Click to expand…


                      It seems like your mind is already made.

                      I would encourage you to re-read all the responses before you take that leap of faith.

                      Choosing to pursue something because of the superficial factors you listed isn’t terrible in a vacuum. Choosing that pathway with a $450000 debt burden suddenly becomes a lot less attractive. And becomes downright disastrous if you aren’t able to make it to the finish line.

                       
                      Click to expand...


                      No, my mind isn't made....I appreciate your response....It's just very hard to find a career path, especially for people my age now....A lot of my friends still live at home with their parents

                      Comment


                      • #41
















                        I happen to be both a dentist and physician.  I left dentistry many years ago not because of the money but because I simply didn’t like it.  One of my friends has a successful dental practice with high hygiene.  His income continues to go down just like mine in medicine however, my top level income was much higher than his.  Personally, I would not consider 450k in debt for ANY profession…there are just too many variables in the world and life.

                        PA and NP.  Strongly agree that those are great professions for the same reasons that some have mentioned.

                         
                        Click to expand…


                        Thanks for the input Hawkeye….To be honest, I am not passionate about Dentistry. I chose Dentistry purely for the work-life balance and the high salary. And also, unlike being a Physician, you do not have to complete a residency–you can start working and earning an income right after graduation…..When I was shadowing a Dentist, I found the work was too detail-oriented and a bit repetitious (drilling & filling teeth, crown and bridge work, etc)…
                        Click to expand…


                        I’m not sure what we are debating then.

                        Like everyone else, I think it would be foolish to go $450K in debt for any career, let alone one I wasn’t passionate about…
                        Click to expand…


                        While I don’t find actual Dental work to be that interesting (drilling & filling teeth, crown & bridge work, endo, etc)—-how many careers enable one to work 35-40 hours a week, directly help people, have a less than 1% unemployment rate, and still enable one to make over a 6 figure income?
                        Click to expand…


                        There are plenty plenty plenty of great careers with good benefits and a decent life IF one becomes excellent at it.  The ONLY way to become excellent for most of us is hard hard hard work early on, in both training and the actual career.  There are usually few shortcuts.

                        And btw, it wasn’t dentistry itself that I didn’t find interesting but rather is was the fact that I was going to be confined in small office every day that I didn’t like.
                        Click to expand...


                        This.

                        I have a career that checks off all your boxes but with 7 figure income.

                        Without tooting my own horn too much, I can't accomplish that without patients lining up to see me.

                        They won't do that if I'm not excellent at what I do.

                        You won't be excellent at what you do if you don't like it.

                        To dislike the core aspects of the field when you haven't even started should be a pretty clear cut sign that it's not the right field for you.

                         

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          So true Darr.

                          I have children in their late 20's and 30's and they are doing just fine.  There is really no excuse not to be able to improve one's situation unless there are extremely unusual circumstances.  If I was your age, I would say it would be a easy to do what I want to do particularly with so many living at home, not willing to work, thinking that life is easy.  It's not.  One almost always has to work very hard to be successful and respectfully, I simply do not see that as usual response in your generation.  I make the case that it's easier than ever to be excellent because the competition overall isn't great.  Yes, EASIER.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Look into dental hygiene.  In my area the new grads are starting at 35/hr.    Much less debt and still a great work/life balance.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              My first full year out of dental school, I associated and actually made close to $180k. I know that's higher than average for that, but I practice in a rural area where there aren't a ton of dentists.  If you want to live in a big city, you just have to accept that you're going to make less due to the extreme saturation in the big metro areas. If you're willing to go rural, you can do much better. You can always live in a big city and commute out.

                              Where I went to dental school (Ohio State), if you're out of state, you pay out of state tuition only for the first year. After that, you gain Ohio residency status and it's much cheaper. In my opinion, there is absolutely NO excuse to pay 450k for dental school, or really any professional school. That's just poor school choice as well as bad financial management while in school. But then again I was fortunate that I got into an affordable state school in my home state.

                              But as others have said, there's really no debate here. If you don't find dentistry interesting, don't do it. Dental school sucks hard, and it's not going to be any easier if you don't at least relatively enjoy the work. I won't say that I absolutely love dentistry; it's certainly just a means to an end for me. But I'm decent at it, and I don't dread going into work, and I enjoy most of the procedures that I do. I count that as a win. The fact that I can make $200k doing it 4 days a week makes it even better. If you haven't even started yet and you already think that it's boring, I think you're making a big mistake going to dental school. It IS repetitive, and it IS detail-oriented. And dental hygiene is even MORE repetitive. Something to think about before you devote your life to a profession just because it has a good work-life balance and pays decent money.

                              Comment


                              • #45




                                Look into dental hygiene.  In my area the new grads are starting at 35/hr.    Much less debt and still a great work/life balance.
                                Click to expand...


                                LOL, no thanks....I am not that desperate, fortunately.....Working as a hygienist would be absolutely miserable

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