Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Medical information blog- things to consider before starting

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Medical information blog- things to consider before starting

    I had a discussion over the holidays with a physician I know who was thinking of starting a medical information blog as a hobby and income source.   He enjoys writing and thinks this would help him and patients.  In particular, he was thinking of writing about medical topics he sees in his practice so that patients better understand their diagnosis.  He is a w2 employee and had some concerns.  First, the liability with giving out medical information over the internet and getting sued.  Is a disclaimer enough or do you need insurance?  How about his employer, a major hospital system finding out?   Obviously patient privacy is a concern but he would have general discussion of topics of concern to patients, not specific examples.  Could the blog be done anonymously or would search engines rank him low or drop him altogether?   Any other concerns anyone would have?  Thanks.

  • #2


    o
    Click to expand...


    I've had similar concerns. You can have disclaimers at the top, middle and bottom of every page but depending on the information and how its presented you may still get sued. I've thought of doing similar, not necessarily with any kind of "what to do" tilt since I think its just so dangerous, but even just bland info some yokel will take as gospel or decide not to go to the doctor.

    Interested in the responses by anyone with any experience or second hand knowledge.

    Comment


    • #3
      Can he remind them to show up on time? It leaves me with more time to explain a diagnosis haha.

      Comment


      • #4
        Reach out to the author of Hormones Demystified. He started within the last couple years and I'm sure he would have some advice.

        Comment


        • #5
          There is a lot out there. I have a professional friend who has been doing this for years, as a hobby and to distribute information to patients and colleagues. I even did a guest piece for him a while back.

          https://theskepticalcardiologist.com

          Comment


          • #6
            So question: why would this be any different than financial blogs? They all claim their advice is just for fun and consult FA/CPA/attorney making decisions in disclaimer on the bottom of the website. Why won't it work for medical info? because its medicine and we must make things painful?

            Comment


            • #7




              So question: why would this be any different than financial blogs? They all claim their advice is just for fun and consult FA/CPA/attorney making decisions in disclaimer on the bottom of the website. Why won’t it work for medical info?
              Click to expand...


              Because no matter what disclaimers you put on the blog post, you can be sued on the grounds that you are providing "inaccurate" medical information that caused someone harm (even if everything you write is spot-on, and you're certain to win the suit).

              Lawsuits are painful enough that most of us go well out of our way to avoid one.  Probably further out of our way than necessary, but what's wrong with playing it safe?

              Comment


              • #8
                That's fine but then is same standard applied to finance blogs or financial advice ? That's what I'm trying to understand. Health harm or financial harm from blog posts, what's the standard ?

                Comment


                • #9




                  That’s fine but then is same standard applied to finance blogs or financial advice ? That’s what I’m trying to understand. Health harm or financial harm from blog posts, what’s the standard ?
                  Click to expand...


                  Physicians are held to a fiduciary standard, while most finance professionals are not.  That's the difference.

                  Comment


                  • #10


                    Physicians are held to a fiduciary standard, while most finance professionals are not. That’s the difference
                    Click to expand...


                    I think there are a couple of layers to this; what does the law say, and what are the professional standards of your body?

                    What I see in personal finance blogs would make our Compliance Team's eyeballs bleed. e.g. Opinion offered as fact, presenting financial advice without being competent to do so, advice on individual securities, advice on complex asset classes (like private offerings), data without attribution etc. I'm sure these sort of actions are illegal by the SEC or similar body. But I'm guessing they have limited resources and concentrate on the most egregious examples of fraud. I guess if you were promoting a pump and dump scheme and pretending to be a financial planner, and they had evidence of a large number of people losing their 401k's then they might act.

                    Most/all finance professional bodies have significant professional guidance and restrictions. The CFA and actuarial exams have a large professionalism component with the ability to sanction individuals who step out of line.

                    So why is this different to medical standards? I don't think it is tbh. I rely on a disclaimer on my site. I have no idea how robust that would be - my guess is it would not offer me any real protection. I do have a formal complaint procedure so that anyone can make a complaint before escalating to a court of law.

                     

                     

                    Comment


                    • #11




                      That’s fine but then is same standard applied to finance blogs or financial advice ? That’s what I’m trying to understand. Health harm or financial harm from blog posts, what’s the standard ?
                      Click to expand...


                      Not only what artemis says, but everyone knows you can lose everything in the market, and its just frankly seen as the investors responsibility. Its more of a cultural thing. For doctors, for mostly worse, its the total opposite and the onus is on us (haha). Just the way it is, the standard is basically tradition unfortunately.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There must someway to deal with the liability; how did Paul Donahue or Zorba Paster do it?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I suggest the potential blogger should discuss with employer the desire to have a medical blog.

                          especially if not anonymous.

                           

                           

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            So then some risks such as liability and potential troubles with Corp. employer remain unanswered. Not sure there is any way around these. Not sure a disclaimer will remove troubles. Probably not worth doing for an employed practicing physician. If your working in a non Corp. job or for yourself than maybe you can get some liability protection through an insurance company?

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X