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Too honest for my own good...

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  • Too honest for my own good...

    A lesson to those like me who are prone to being a little "too" honest...

     

    Had a medical questionnaire/blood test etc with a nurse as part of a term life insurance application.

    As part of her extensive questionnaire, they obviously went through smoking history (I don't smoke) but when asked specifically about any tobacco products I let my guard down and mentioned "nothing except maybe a shisha pipe while on vacation last summer".

     

    Well, friends, my 690$/year non-smoker rate was amended to 2050$/year smoker rate due to a single tobacco exposure.

    I can request a rate reduction in July when I have been 12 months tobacco-free! Insurance companies are a joke.

    But then again, I brought this on myself! DOH!

  • #2
    just go look at another company.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, that’s pretty lame. I learned my lesson (but in a fortuitous way) in residency when some insurance saleswoman was pushing whole life policies at a time that I had zero financial savvy. I think we were near the underwriting phase when she was asking about smoking and drug history and I naively said that I had tried marijuana once in college or something to that effect. She about freaked out and basically tried to get me to backtrack on my statement. I didn’t and the policy offer was rescinded. Good thing it turns out in the end. Probably saved me thousands of dollars. And the experience did help years later when I was trying to get term life appropriate for my future self’s situation and I knew how to answer all the questions.  

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, I would have said nothing in that situation, its neither here nor there. Go with another company and do not make that same mistake.

        And maybe think about changing your handle to Angelfish.

        Comment


        • #5




          Yeah, I would have said nothing in that situation, its neither here nor there. Go with another company and do not make that same mistake.

          And maybe think about changing your handle to Angelfish.
          Click to expand...


          The problem is the next application will ask "have you ever been downrated (or whatever they call it) by an insurance company?" That's why medical conditions should be shopped around informally. There's a database for this stuff to keep you from doing that.
          Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

          Comment


          • #6
            It's interesting that the questions do tend to focus on single exposures.

            Maybe a good message for the youth? "Don't smoke b/c it will complicate your underwriting process for life insurance."

            Comment


            • #7
              The questions on smoking I've heard are usually very awkwardly worded.  Sometimes it's do you "use" tobacco products.  Sometimes "have you ever" smoked (and that one cigar you had at a friend's wedding means you're a smoker).  It almost feels like if you smoked a brisket for a BBQ you'd be a smoker.

              Drinking is usually pretty straightforward but occasionally the questionnaire doesn't seem to contemplate a light drinker either.

              Comment


              • #8







                Yeah, I would have said nothing in that situation, its neither here nor there. Go with another company and do not make that same mistake.

                And maybe think about changing your handle to Angelfish.
                Click to expand…


                The problem is the next application will ask “have you ever been downrated (or whatever they call it) by an insurance company?” That’s why medical conditions should be shopped around informally. There’s a database for this stuff to keep you from doing that.
                Click to expand...


                "Denied coverage" is a big one.  I haven't noticed any downrated language so far, but perhaps I haven't paid close enough attention.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Same response when I told the adjuster about occasionally driving on a race track.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I do recall on the phone interview with MetLife they asked me if I currently smoked or currently drank (of which I did neither) and I responded in the negative, and they asked no follow up questions.

                    I have thought at times that maybe I should ask patients if they have disability and life insurance set up before they go on wild goose hunts for their vague symptoms. They would have to then probably lie that their symptoms only started after they were approved for their insurance. Even in that scenario, they may still lose out since most companies have a 2-3 year period where if symptoms develop they can review to determine whether they'll cover it or not.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      With regard to common vices: tobacco/other flammables/alcohol. I was quite staunch with male RN reviewer. "No sir, Nevah Evah, sir!"

                      The only admission I'd make is to a potentially dangerous hobby i.e.. scuba diving in my case. I didn't want to accidentally die with a regulator in my mouth

                      in 80 feet of water and the kids get nothing.

                      Comment


                      • #12







                        Yeah, I would have said nothing in that situation, its neither here nor there. Go with another company and do not make that same mistake.

                        And maybe think about changing your handle to Angelfish.
                        Click to expand…


                        The problem is the next application will ask “have you ever been downrated (or whatever they call it) by an insurance company?” That’s why medical conditions should be shopped around informally. There’s a database for this stuff to keep you from doing that.
                        Click to expand...


                        I know everyone thinks of HIPAA as a patient privacy right but if you really read the fine print, it's a law designed to facilitate the transfer of your health care information between INSURERS. The concern for devilfish now is that if he/she accepts a lower non-smoking rate elsewhere the insurer may be able to refuse to pay out because he 'lied' on his policy.

                         

                        Comment


                        • #13










                          Yeah, I would have said nothing in that situation, its neither here nor there. Go with another company and do not make that same mistake.

                          And maybe think about changing your handle to Angelfish.
                          Click to expand…


                          The problem is the next application will ask “have you ever been downrated (or whatever they call it) by an insurance company?” That’s why medical conditions should be shopped around informally. There’s a database for this stuff to keep you from doing that.
                          Click to expand…


                          I know everyone thinks of HIPAA as a patient privacy right but if you really read the fine print, it’s a law designed to facilitate the transfer of your health care information between INSURERS. The concern for devilfish now is that if he/she accepts a lower non-smoking rate elsewhere the insurer may be able to refuse to pay out because he ‘lied’ on his policy.

                           
                          Click to expand...


                          I know of this since I only deal with cash. We still adhere to that kind of ideal, especially with staff, but its only when you bill a third party payer. Im sure you wouldnt want to test the spirit of the law as a practitioner.

                          Guess he just has to wait it out, and be careful what you say! Obviously honesty is important but we know that one exposure isnt changing anything materially.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Perhaps the message you should take from this experience is that the occasional “shisha pipe” (whatever that is) is more dangerous to your health than you think. Insurance company probably thinks that anyone who knows what a sisha pipe is, must be a smoking enthusiast.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ouch a $1360 hit from a shisha pipe...  I haven't tried it, but I bet it didn't bring you THAT much of a marginal increase in happiness!!

                              :lol:

                              Comment

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