Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Early 30s, looking to purchase first motorcycle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31




    Most of the SCUBA risk is accounted for by technical divers who are diving >150ft, not your average vacation recreational diver that rarely goes below 90. Motorcycling on the other hand is stupidly dangerous for something that, let’s be honest, isn’t that fun. Yes we all went on dirtbikes and scooters as a kid.  Most adults, at least the ones you would actually want to be around, would never want to be associated with the image and obnoxious sound of a motorcycle (especially a Harley).

     

    Maybe I’m just grumpy over the pack of motorcyclist jerks who gun it through my neighborhood every night at 1AM just to give us a metaphorical middle finger. But come on dude, motorcycling is super lame in every way possible. I’ll leave you with this spot-on SouthPark clip that sums up motorcyclists in 30 seconds:

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LlA0_Hv3CQ
    Click to expand...


    I think you need to move to a nicer neighborhood.

    Comment


    • #32




      I am looking to purchase my first motorcycle. I have never ridden a bike (well I did once the other week) but I have had a desire to get into it and learn.

      Good/bad idea? Is it possible to learn and ride safely?

      I’m early thirties, just out of residency, and everything is moving along swimmingly. I am a very positive and energetic person. I would hate for something bad to happen (who wouldn’t right). I am single (if this matters), in my early 30s, lots of ventures outside medicine. I live in such a climate that it would only be possible to ride a bike 4-5 months out of the year maximum.

      One of my closest friends and girlfriend is against it, my friend more so. My vision is also not the greatest.

      A few newer friends locally are encouraging me to get one. I would really appreciate any feedback.
      Click to expand...


      I thought about getting a motorcycle. Fun. Cheap. Economical. Then I started residency. My second month was Trauma. In August (aka Trauma Season.) I've never really considered it again since and I consider my most dangerous hobby not to be mountain biking, rock climbing, boating, canyoneering, mountaineering, or even backcountry skiing. It's road biking. Cars and pavement are bad things to come in contact with at high speed.
      Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

      Comment


      • #33
        i have been riding since I was 12, now 54. Dirt biking has been a great family sport for us as well.

        I equate it to surgery, training and precision are rewarded, foolishness can end in disaster.

        Find the things that make your life fun and enjoy them intensely.

         

        Comment


        • #34
          I sold my ZX-14R a couple years ago.  Between work and family etc, just don't have the time to ride anymore.

          IMO you should get it while you can.  You're doing it right, starting with a 300 instead of some 600 or 1000.  Just make sure you take a class, wear good gear, and take it easy.

          If you're only riding recreationally, weekends in good weather, particularly on backroads, any risk drops considerably.  Don't decide to commute everyday on your motorcycle, don't ride in the rain, don't be stupid, you'll be ok.  Personally I feel much safer on a motorcycle than I do a bicycle, and tons of docs are cyclists.  Streets are littered around here with those white ghost bicycles where a cyclist died.  No thanks.

          If it were truly that dangerous, then #1) it would probably be illegal and, at the very least, #2) you would be completely uninsurable as a rider.  Obviously neither of these are the case.  When I got my term life policy, I had to fill out a sheet disclosing how much I ride, kind of bike I ride, and I put down that I had a Kawasaki 1400, which was literally one of the fastest superbikes you can buy, and I was still approved for the best, super-preferred rate.

          It's a great hobby, very inexpensive, and a lot of fun.

          Comment


          • #35




            I sold my ZX-14R a couple years ago.  Between work and family etc, just don’t have the time to ride anymore.

            IMO you should get it while you can.  You’re doing it right, starting with a 300 instead of some 600 or 1000.  Just make sure you take a class, wear good gear, and take it easy.

            If you’re only riding recreationally, weekends in good weather, particularly on backroads, any risk drops considerably.  Don’t decide to commute everyday on your motorcycle, don’t ride in the rain, don’t be stupid, you’ll be ok.  Personally I feel much safer on a motorcycle than I do a bicycle, and tons of docs are cyclists.  Streets are littered around here with those white ghost bicycles where a cyclist died.  No thanks.

            If it were truly that dangerous, then #1) it would probably be illegal and, at the very least, #2) you would be completely uninsurable as a rider.  Obviously neither of these are the case.  When I got my term life policy, I had to fill out a sheet disclosing how much I ride, kind of bike I ride, and I put down that I had a Kawasaki 1400, which was literally one of the fastest superbikes you can buy, and I was still approved for the best, super-preferred rate.

            It’s a great hobby, very inexpensive, and a lot of fun.
            Click to expand...


            There are plenty of ways to decrease risk in both activities. Really its like a pareto principle, 80% of the risk is really concentrated and if you avoid those things its very safe. Just have to figure them and adjust accordingly.

            Comment

            Working...
            X