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Discuss Latest POF Blog Post: An Epic Fail at Early Retirement

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  • Discuss Latest POF Blog Post: An Epic Fail at Early Retirement

    I share a lot of success stories here at Physician on FIRE. I feel that mine is one of them, ... Read more

    Click here to view the article!
    Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

  • #2
    Looks sad. Probably happens more than we want to admit. Like failing at stock selections or market timing, or realestate failures, no one wants to brag about this.
    Survivor bias exists in most of what we read.
    Cautionary tail.
    thanks for sharing.

    Comment


    • #3
      I enjoyed this article. Clearly if in a relationship both need to be 100% on board with any plan. Lot of judgement thrown at the spouse about her wanting to have a more "normal" life. A real MrMoneyMustache living (30-40K yearly) with no room to splurge for 40 years is not a dream for the majority of us. I wouldn't enjoy it and neither would my wife (and I wouldn't force it on her either).

      Comment


      • #4
        I read that last year. It was a powerful cautionary tale. People notoriously struggle to understand what makes them happy.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you want to read the actual post of the blogger who failed retirement, it's here. . . https://livingafi.com/2021/03/17/the...rement-update/

          Not sure why POF posted another blogger's recap of someone else's failed retirement. . .
          Last edited by JWeb; 02-04-2022, 11:46 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JWeb View Post
            If you want to read the actual post of blogger who failed retirement, it's here. . . https://livingafi.com/2021/03/17/the...rement-update/

            Not sure why POF posted another bloggers recap of someone else's failed retirement. . .
            Thanks for the post. I read his account. I guess the take away for me is this. Was it really an epic fail? Yeah some badness but he preserved.

            So he had to go back to work or chose to go back to work.

            Sure, bad stuff happened. Got sick. Got divorced. But at the end he seems like he is getting good medical care. Found a new love. Is doing

            OK financially. Maybe I am just an optimist but seems like it is working out ok. No ones life is all roses.

            The only certainly is change. He is rolling with the punches and throwing back as good as he is getting.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tangler View Post

              Thanks for the post. I read his account. I guess the take away for me is this. Was it really an epic fail? Yeah some badness but he preserved.

              So he had to go back to work or chose to go back to work.

              Sure, bad stuff happened. Got sick. Got divorced. But at the end he seems like he is getting good medical care. Found a new love. Is doing

              OK financially. Maybe I am just an optimist but seems like it is working out ok. No ones life is all roses.

              The only certainly is change. He is rolling with the punches and throwing back as good as he is getting.
              "Epic Fail" is certainly click-baity.

              But if you don't consider a divorce, clinical depression, and going back to work because you don't think you have enough money "failing early retirement", what do you consider failing early retirement?

              No one says he failed at life, but he certainly did at retiring early.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JWeb View Post

                "Epic Fail" is certainly click-baity.

                But if you don't consider a divorce, clinical depression, and going back to work because you don't think you have enough money "failing early retirement", what do you consider failing early retirement?

                No one says he failed at life, but he certainly did at retiring early.
                Fair.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I never heard of him till this post, read his story just now, not sure it’s an epic fail though

                  We are not a fan of lean FIRE concept for many reasons and lack of wiggle room financially seen here, is a prime reason

                  But, he persevered and adapting well to life curve balls thrown at him.

                  Good health insurance and a paid off house probably is the best foundation of a well thought out FIRE plan, some passive income coupled with good health and few hobbies go a long way in that journey I suppose

                  My spouse constantly reminds me her worry about unforeseen ill health events or some dumb law suit ( professional/personal) derailing our own FIRE plan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Super early retirement on a lean budget is to me just a chance to pivot. Mid/late 30s with 1-2 million and want to try something new? Take a few years off, explore, but don’t anticipate you will never return to making some income. It’s very unlikely.

                    sounds like he and his spouse were incompatible and were going to find that out sooner or later. Sooner is generally better, albeit still painful. It’s telling that she wanted to return to work, but only if he did too.

                    I’m a Dan Savage fan, and he always gives the advice that just because a relationship fails, doesn’t mean it was a failure. If you enjoyed aspects, learned about your self, etc, it was a success. I think the same can be said for any job, or phase of life such as early retirement. Just because it doesn’t last until you die doesn’t make it a failure. A lot of people dream of ER and never pull the trigger out of fear. Good on this guy for giving it a try and learning what he did. I bet he is happier/more fulfilled in the long term because he did, rather than continuing with whatever he was doing before that he wanted out of and not giving ER/writing/etc a try because of fear of failure.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Anne View Post
                      Super early retirement on a lean budget is to me just a chance to pivot. Mid/late 30s with 1-2 million and want to try something new? Take a few years off, explore, but don’t anticipate you will never return to making some income. It’s very unlikely.

                      sounds like he and his spouse were incompatible and were going to find that out sooner or later. Sooner is generally better, albeit still painful. It’s telling that she wanted to return to work, but only if he did too.

                      I’m a Dan Savage fan, and he always gives the advice that just because a relationship fails, doesn’t mean it was a failure. If you enjoyed aspects, learned about your self, etc, it was a success. I think the same can be said for any job, or phase of life such as early retirement. Just because it doesn’t last until you die doesn’t make it a failure. A lot of people dream of ER and never pull the trigger out of fear. Good on this guy for giving it a try and learning what he did. I bet he is happier/more fulfilled in the long term because he did, rather than continuing with whatever he was doing before that he wanted out of and not giving ER/writing/etc a try because of fear of failure.
                      Yep, life is an adventure. Fail forward, move on, keep going, learn, grow, appreciate.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Incredibly fortunate in timing of life changes.
                        Length of time out of work and age are probably the two most significant.
                        A few more years and employment would have been tough. Shelf life on skills. 7-10 years and the absence would have made employment difficult.
                        Age, mid 40's is different than 50 ish. If he would have been 48 yrs and not have worked, most contacts and resume looks would have vanished.
                        An unemployed 50 ish is unattractive for an employer or a partner.
                        Sometimes it is better to be lucky that skilled. Fate was kind to him.
                        Hope his next plan works out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tim View Post
                          Incredibly fortunate in timing of life changes.
                          Length of time out of work and age are probably the two most significant.
                          A few more years and employment would have been tough. Shelf life on skills. 7-10 years and the absence would have made employment difficult.
                          Age, mid 40's is different than 50 ish. If he would have been 48 yrs and not have worked, most contacts and resume looks would have vanished.
                          An unemployed 50 ish is unattractive for an employer or a partner.
                          Sometimes it is better to be lucky that skilled. Fate was kind to him.
                          Hope his next plan works out.
                          Luck counts. Who knows? some may say he got pretty ************************ unlucky?
                          Wife left with another dude while he was sick with chronic illness,….etc. He was lucky that he had the fortitude & tenacity to get on with it.
                          If he was really lucky he might have written a best seller? heck, he might yet! Life is an adventure! Also, don’t underestimate the 50 year olds! I am 48 & just warming up! Get after it!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tangler View Post
                            Luck counts. Who knows? some may say he got pretty ************************ unlucky?
                            Wife left with another dude while he was sick with chronic illness,….etc. He was lucky that he had the fortitude & tenacity to get on with it.
                            If he was really lucky he might have written a best seller? heck, he might yet! Life is an adventure! Also, don’t underestimate the 50 year olds! I am 48 & just warming up! Get after it!
                            Sometimes the fish aren't biting. What can I say? "May the Force be with you". Medicine is probably a much lower age factor at 50 than most other occupations.
                            50 might be young for a tournament fisherman.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You guys all missed this the first time around huh? A great reminder for me that all of my audiences have little overlap. I guess I can just keep reading my blog posts on the podcast. No one seems to have noticed so far.
                              Helping those who wear the white coat get a fair shake on Wall Street since 2011

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