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The net worth thread got me thinking, “What’s next?”

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  • #16
    At the end of the day filling up the 30 years or so after medicine is a daunting task. I realized early on that nothing in my future life would match the thrill and sense of achievement that a perfect vaginal twin birth or a c-section for a prolapsed cord brought to me. I recognized this and retired any way. I keep birth announcements and photos that patients gave me in a bonus space above my garage. If I ever feel like I did not achieve anything with my life I go and look at the photos. I am facebook friends with a number of my former patients and really enjoy seeing patients that I delivered get married or have kids of their own. The lifestyle of OB is really too hard as one ages. You will find things to fill the time I guarantee you. It will be different.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Hatton View Post
      At the end of the day filling up the 30 years or so after medicine is a daunting task. I realized early on that nothing in my future life would match the thrill and sense of achievement that a perfect vaginal twin birth or a c-section for a prolapsed cord brought to me. I recognized this and retired any way. I keep birth announcements and photos that patients gave me in a bonus space above my garage. If I ever feel like I did not achieve anything with my life I go and look at the photos. I am facebook friends with a number of my former patients and really enjoy seeing patients that I delivered get married or have kids of their own. The lifestyle of OB is really too hard as one ages. You will find things to fill the time I guarantee you. It will be different.
      I think that this is part of it as well. I have dedicated so much time to become a master at my medical craft. Years of study, years of honing my clinical skills by building experience with so many patients, and one of my favorite things in life is when other top quality physicians come to me for clinical advice. I struggle with the thought of letting go of all of that hard earned experience, and letting go of that ego boost that I get from the recognition of the help that I give, and also letting go of the appreciation from others for the expertise that I have honed. It is hard to let go and it is a one way street, use it or lose it. I am already a bit off of the top of my game, not in terms of knowledge, but in terms of reflexes because I don't work as much clinically. Just the same, I started out at the highest level so I have some comfortable room to fall a bit. I need to stop before I fall too far.

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      • #18
        Just remember- if you leave, they will have no idea who you are in six months or a year. Eventually you will be that old guy coming by. Unless you are Shakespeare, Salk, Mozart- your work dies before, if not with you.
        Focus on those to whom you matter.

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        • #19
          I think women have an easier transition than men. There is more opportunity to define yourself other than work. Just an opinion...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bev View Post
            I think women have an easier transition than men. There is more opportunity to define yourself other than work. Just an opinion...
            Also, the workplace values men more than women...so there's less to lose. One less day of tone policing and being called nurse!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by snowcanyon View Post

              Also, the workplace values men more than women...so there's less to lose. One less day of tone policing and being called nurse!
              Ahh again the loss of relevance. Just a reminder to the highly accomplished group here. For some, the pinnacle of their accomplishments were in high school or middle school!

              Image is everything! Especially self image. Perception and self perception are tough to reconcile. You are important to those close to you. Every man woman and child are important. Work should not define your self image. It is how you make money.
              https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...-is-everything

              Don't let work define you, it is just a phase most go through.

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              • #22
                Most of the greats, especially in sports, retire when they're way past their prime. My goal is to retire before then.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
                  Most of the greats, especially in sports, retire when they're way past their prime. My goal is to retire before then.
                  Go out on a high note?

                  https://youtu.be/8YaaZZN9VYs

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                  • #24
                    The self-identity and tangentially self importance issues that are bandied about here as rationale to keep working have made me think. In my retirement years (6), I very rarely volunteer my past profession. Nor do I talk finances. Kind of like being one of the guys- whether talking cars, beer, dogs, or hiking. Probably has to do with my cognitive decline.

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                    • #25
                      Interesting contrast between the East Tennessee thread - planned to retire and did it - and this one by WBD - could retire but doesn’t plan to anytime soon. I’m all about options, so I set myself a goal a few years back of being able to retire 12/22. I’m clearly FI at this point, so I can retire now much less a year from now, but not sure I will be ready to pull the trigger even then. I am not burning with a desire to work longer, but neither do I want to walk away from a job I am good at, makes a difference, and which pays me a lot. (I admit, the money matters to me even though I don’t actually need more.) The other major factor is having options for afterwards. Current plan for the year is to slow down and smell the roses while trying to figure out what will constitute for me a good life in retirement (defined here as leaving my job even if I go do something else less strenuous). I am hoping that will clarify a time frame to wrap up the career.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
                        Most of the greats, especially in sports, retire when they're way past their prime. My goal is to retire before then.
                        Hank Aaron was past his prime when he set the home run record. Just sayin it ain’t always a bad call to stick around.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Auric goldfinger View Post
                          The self-identity and tangentially self importance issues that are bandied about here as rationale to keep working have made me think. In my retirement years (6), I very rarely volunteer my past profession. Nor do I talk finances. Kind of like being one of the guys- whether talking cars, beer, dogs, or hiking. Probably has to do with my cognitive decline.
                          I totally get this. The guys don’t care that much. If asked I usually respond “I work at” rather than “I run.” And I’m pretty sure I’ll be fine with “I’m retired” when the time comes. But I don’t think that is what WBD is talking about. He just actually gets validation from the work he does, not telling people about it.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Auric goldfinger View Post
                            The self-identity and tangentially self importance issues that are bandied about here as rationale to keep working have made me think. In my retirement years (6), I very rarely volunteer my past profession. Nor do I talk finances. Kind of like being one of the guys- whether talking cars, beer, dogs, or hiking. Probably has to do with my cognitive decline.
                            If you can post here then you are not in cognitive decline. IMHO.

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                            • #29
                              One of the issues with quitting work while still able is the challenge of replacing it with enough to create a life of purpose, identity and connection.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by CordMcNally View Post
                                Most of the greats, especially in sports, retire when they're way past their prime. My goal is to retire before then.
                                Barry Sanders......he went out on top. He probably still has knees too!

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